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Mario Royale gives a Nintendo classic the battle royale treatment

first_img Share your voice 1 The way the game works is that 100 players go through the same level of Super Mario Bros. Each individual has their own instance of the game and for the most part don’t interact directly with the other players, which makes it appear that there are 99 other Mario “ghosts.” Each player can, however, interact with the level and in turn, affect the other players’ instance of the level. If one player grabs the mushroom to make Mario big, that item isn’t available to everyone else. A player could also jump on a Koopa turtle’s shell, causing it to knock into other players and kill them. Things get even more interesting when one player obtains the star and goes invincible. Now, that player is active in everyone’s instance and can eliminate anyone they touch. There are several different worlds based on levels from Super Mario Bros. Each world has four levels, and the player who reaches the last level and gets past Bowser first will be the winner. Mario Royale is available to play via a web browser, and players can use a keyboard or gamepad to control Mario.  Comment Nintendocenter_img Tags Battle royale goes 8-bit in Mario Royale.   InfernoPlus Battle Royale games such as Fornite, Apex Legends, and PUBG are incredibly popular right now. One YouTuber took the formula for those games and added it to a Nintendo classic. Mario Royale, made by YouTuber InfernoPlus, is a battle royale mod of the original Super Mario Bros. Players compete against 99 other player-controlled Marios to see who’s the first to beat Bowser. Computers Gaminglast_img read more

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Merkel condemns farright xenophobic attacks

first_imgGerman Chancellor Angela Merkel speaks during a session at the lower house of parliament Bundestag in Berlin, Germany, 12 September 2018. Photo: ReutersGerman Chancellor Angela Merkel condemned xenophobic attacks and the use of Nazi slogans in a robust speech to parliament on Wednesday after the most violent far-right demonstrations in decades exposed deep divisions in the country.In an unusually rowdy session in the Bundestag (lower house) later, far-right Alternative for Germany (AfD) deputies stormed out of the chamber after a Social Democrat (SPD) accused them of being “unsavory” right-wing radicals.Protests by right-wing militants in the eastern city of Chemnitz two weeks ago after the fatal stabbing of a German blamed on two migrants have reignited a fierce debate about Merkel’s 2015 decision to let in more than a million refugees.”There is no excuse or reason for hunting people down, using violence and Nazi slogans, showing hostility to people who look different, who have a Jewish restaurant, for attacks on police officers,” Merkel told the Bundestag.”We will not allow whole groups in our society to be quietly excluded,” she said, adding that Jews, Muslims, Christians and atheists all belong in German society, and stressing that human dignity was paramount.Before Merkel took the podium, the head of the AfD group in the Bundestag said Germany’s “domestic peace” was at risk.”As disgusting as Hitler salutes are, I would like to remind you that the really serious event in Chemnitz was the bloody deed (committed) by two asylum seekers,” said Alexander Gauland.He accused Merkel of spreading fake news about the protests and supported Hans-Georg Maassen, head of the BfV intelligence agency who is under fire for questioning whether video footage showing rightist gangs hounding migrants were real.”The truth is, there was no hunting down of people in Chemnitz… The citizens who demonstrated were criminalised,” said Gauland.”Mrs Chancellor, you have nothing more to offer the people of this country than obstinacy, dogmatism and insults. Barricade yourself up in the chancellery away from reality!”After Maassen took questions from a parliamentary committee behind closed doors about his comments on event in Chemnitz, Interior Minister Horst Seehofer said he saw no reason to dismiss the BfV chief.But the SPD said that after examining a BfV report on the violence and hearing Maassen’s defence of his disputed views that he should resign, saying it remained unconvinced he was the right person to lead the agency.The centre-left SPD is the junior member of Merkel’s conservative-led coalition.The AfD, some of whose members joined right-wing militants in the Chemnitz marches, is the third biggest party in Germany. Its lawmakers’ presence in parliament, which they entered after the 2017 election, has generated a more confrontational climate.Senior Social Democrat Johannes Kahrs launched a verbal attack on the AfD: “Right wing radicals in parliament are unsavory. Hate makes you ugly – look in the mirror!”At that, all AfD deputies stood up and left the chamber. In a statement, the party said Kahrs had compared them to Nazis and described his insults as “unacceptable”.Earlier, former Social Democratic leader Martin Schulz also condemned the AfD, ending up by saying, “You belong on the dungheap of history,” to loud applause.last_img read more

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Physical chemistry could answer many questions on fracking

first_img(Phys.org) —By some estimates, continued growth in hydraulic fracturing (or “fracking”/”fraccing”) could put the US on the path to self-sufficiency in energy over the next few decades. Yet despite the potential economic benefits, fracking has also generated controversy due to the unknown long-term consequences of all the drilling, pumping, fracturing, and extracting processes involved. Now, two scientists have identified several important scientific challenges encountered in fracking that can be addressed with physical chemistry, which could lead to improved fracking techniques. Journal information: Journal of Physical Chemistry Letters Citation: Physical chemistry could answer many questions on fracking (2013, March 5) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2013-03-physical-chemistry-fracking.html Other questions include how much natural gas is absorbed by the porous shale, how much natural gas (and other hydrocarbons) is present in source rocks, whether these can be produced, whether fracturing fluids can be designed to reduce the amount of salt and trace metals that are extracted along with the hydrocarbons, how proppants (additives used to “prop” open the fractures) change the flow properties of the hydrocarbons, how back-flow water is treated after it flows back to the surface, how to minimize natural gas and oil leaks at the surface to avoid contaminating aquifers, and many more. “We believe that proper fundamental investigations and attention in the application of the hydraulic fracturing technology will be able to limit the environmental impact of hydraulic fracturing,” Striolo said. “Although accidents can always happen, proper planning and attention to safety and environmental regulations will limit the likelihood of such events.”Essentially every stage of the fracking process poses fundamental questions, but Yethiraj and Striolo think that physical chemists, with collaboration from researchers in other fields, are capable of providing answers. Both scientists are currently investigating questions that could impact fracking in the future. Yethiraj and his group are developing models for water and aqueous solutions and investigating the static and dynamic properties of water-soluble polymers. Striolo has been investigating the thermodynamic and transport properties of aqueous systems confined in narrow pores. He is also participating in an international initiative (Deep Carbon Observatory https://dco.gl.ciw.edu), whose goal is to better understand the Earth’s carbon cycle. The results from these areas of research could help answer some of the questions highlighted in the commentary. Copyright 2013 Phys.org All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed in whole or part without the express written permission of Phys.org. English tremors blamed on shale ‘fracking’ The process of hydraulic fracturing involves drilling a vertical and horizontal well, which can allow the exploration of wide shale formations (up to 6,000 acres) with only a small surface pad (6 acres). Points A, B, C identify the locations for future research opportunities. Credit: Arun Yethiraj and Alberto Striolo, et al. ©2013 American Chemical Society Physical chemists Arun Yethiraj, a professor at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, and Alberto Striolo, an associate professor at the University of Oklahoma in Norman, have published an overview of how physical chemistry could lead to a better understanding of fracking in a guest commentary in The Journal of Physical Chemistry Letters. Over the past several years, fracking has become more widespread in the US as a relatively cheap way to produce natural gas and oil. The basic process involves drilling into the ground, first vertically and then horizontally; lining this well with a metal casing that contains small holes; and then pumping water (with some additives) into the well at high pressure, which flows through the holes and causes the surrounding rock to crack open. Out of the open cracks in the rock, fluids such as natural gas, oil, and about 10% of the pumped water can flow back to the well and be collected at the surface.While fracking is currently being used with commercial success, much is still unknown about the details of the process. In 2012, the US National Science Foundation funded a workshop on hydraulic shale fracturing that brought together scientists and engineers from a variety of backgrounds. In the new commentary, Yethiraj and Striolo draw upon the information from this workshop to address the fundamental scientific problems that arise in fracking, and briefly propose how they might be solved with tools from physical chemistry.”We attempted to outline many physical chemistry questions, to engage the broad community,” Striolo told Phys.org. “Every scientist can target a question of his/her personal interest. The impact on the development of the fracking technology, however, is likely to depend on a global systemic approach, where all aspects we pointed out, and others, are tackled together.”For instance, some of the big questions in fracking require a better understanding of the physical properties of fluids in shale, which could be addressed by methods that characterize the shale microstructure and nanostructure, as well as measurements that monitor changes in rock properties upon infiltration of fluids. And since only 10% of the water that was pumped into the well flows back out, where does the rest of it go? If the water is absorbed into the shale, how does it affect the rocks’ response to mechanical movement? Experimental data, computer simulations, coarse-grained models, and theoretical studies could help answer these questions. More information: Arun Yethiraj and Alberto Striolo. “Fracking: What Can Physical Chemistry Offer?” The Journal of Physical Chemistry Letters. DOI: 10.1021/jz4000141e This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Explore furtherlast_img read more