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Alphabets Verily is reportedly making shoes that track weight and falls

first_img Aug 31 • Best places to sell your used electronics in 2019 CNET may get a commission from retail offers. 7 Photos Track your health and step up your game with these smart shoes (pictures) Apple reading • Alphabet’s Verily is reportedly making shoes that track weight and falls Aug 31 • iPhone XR vs. iPhone 8 Plus: Which iPhone should you buy? Apple Watch Series 4 $349 Wearable Tech Mentioned Above Apple Watch Series 4 GPS (40mm silver aluminum case, white sport band) • See It Apple Tags $399 Walmart See It See it Share your voice Preview • Apple Watch Series 4 review in progress (updated) $413 News • Apple Watch Series 4 vs. Galaxy Watch Active: What’s the best smartwatch? See It Verily is reportedly working on smart shoes. Ilya S. Savenok/Getty Images Your shoes may very well be your next fitness and health tracker.Verily, Alphabet’s life sciences arm, has been reportedly working on smart shoes that can track your weight and movements and detect falls. As reported by CNBC, the Verily has been showing off a prototype pair to potential partners to co-develop the shoes.Sudden changes to a person’s weight can indicate health problems like congestive heart failure. Having a pair of shoes that can accurately track your weight could be a way to alert a person of a more serious condition as soon as it’s detected.The trend of wearables that can detect falls is nothing new. Last year, Apple launched its newest Apple Watch, which can detect when the wearer loses their balance. French company Helite makes protective jackets and vest for skiers, cyclists and motorcycle riders that inflate when a fall is detected. Helite also makes the Hip’Safe a belt for elderly people that inflates airbags to protect their hips in a fall.And Verily isn’t the only company working on beefing up shoes. Nike unveiled last month the Adapt BB, the latest iteration of its self-tying shoes. As if the Back to the Future-style tying wasn’t smart enough, Nike’s shoes pair up with your phone in order to collect data, make adjustments and even get software updates.It’s not known whether the smart shoes project is active or not. However, Verily isn’t the first company to pursue smart footwear. The French company E-vone announced a pair that can also track weight and detect the wearer taking a spill at CES in 2018. Verily did not immediately respond to a request to comment.First published Feb. 1, 2019 at 4:27 p.m. PT.Update Feb. 5, 2019 at 8:03 a.m. PT: Added more background information on smart shoes. Aug 31 • Your phone screen is gross. Here’s how to clean it Sep 1 • iPhone 11, Apple Watch 5 and more: The final rumors Best Buy See All 3 Google Apple Alphabet Inc. How To • How to use the Apple Watch ECG app $349 Comments Review • Apple Watch Series 4 review: ECG, and a lot of refinementslast_img read more

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Forensics Report Shows What Guns Are Mostly Used For In Harris County

first_img 00:00 /03:59 Listen DmyTo/Getty Images/iStockphotoLess than a month ago, Devin Kelley walked into a church in Sutherland Springs, Texas and opened fire killing 26 people.An armed neighbor wounded Kelley who later turned his gun on himself.State Attorney General Ken Paxton suggested on Fox News that good people with guns might stop the bad ones.“If it’s a place where somebody has the ability to carry there is also the opportunity that the gunman will be taken out before he has the opportunity to kill very many people,” Paxton said.But how often does that happen, that a bystander saves the day with a gun?That question was just one of many we wanted to look into. For some answers we talked with Ashraf Mozayani.“Very very low number you are looking that somebody protects themselves with the gun,” she said.How would Mozayani know?For years, she saw the result of gun fire first-hand when she worked at the medical examiner’s office. “I have been the lab director and chief toxicologist for Harris County Institute of Forensic Science or at that time we called the medical examiner’s office from 1996 to 2012,” she said.If someone died in Harris County and required an autopsy, Mozayani was a part of a team analyzing the report.“In any medical examiner office every morning you usually sit at the table and see every case that comes to the office,” she said.Mozayani said she rarely saw a report of a fatality where someone used a gun in defense.“It’s not that many and those people that are protecting themselves with a gun are usually well trained police officer or someone off duty,” she said.So, if people are rarely using guns for protection, how were they being used when someone was killed?We found the most recent statistics in the 2016 annual report from where Mozayani used to work, the Harris County Institute of Forensic Sciences.In Harris County last year, there were 478 homicides,  people killing other people.Knives, clubs, and strangulation were used in some but in the vast majority, a gun was the weapon,  accounting for 371 of those 478 homicides.In cases of people killing themselves, guns accounted for 285 of the 500 suicides in Harris County last year.“For the victims of suicide it is firearm,”Mozayani said. “It’s about 60 percent of them is firearm.”Mozayani pointed us to a particularly troubling stat, she says when children died from injuries in Harris County, the leading cause was a gun.Last year, guns killed 33 kids. That’s more than any other single cause, including drownings, even car accidents.Next, we asked Mozayani about exactly what kinds of guns are used in Harris County. “So pistols is about more than 60 percent of the cases that come to the lab,” she said.So, handguns as opposed to the semi-automatic rifles used in mass shootings including those in Sutherland Springs and Las Vegas.Mozayani says in the 16 years she worked in the medical examiner’s office, she never saw any cases near the horrific magnitude of those.It was instead a day-in-day-out continuous stream of gun-caused death.And how did that make Mozayani feel about guns?“I am a gun owner and that happened exactly after the Ike flood,” she said. “I was alone in the house. I was very very afraid.”So, she got a gun for protection.Mozayani said it just comes down to being a responsible gun owner.“It’s very important who has the gun and how to keep the gun and what kind of gun they have,”she said.Mozayani is now a professor of forensics at Texas Southern University.She  plans to have her PhD students do a study next year on trends in gun ownership and gun use in Houston. Share To embed this piece of audio in your site, please use this code: Xlast_img read more