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Prospecting UpSells with Behavioral Analytics

first_imgThe first chart shows the daily use profile for two different individual subscribers by graphing the total number of reports accessed over a 90-day period. Each daily use profile is color coded based on the unique devices used to access the reports. The daily use profile with just the blue color shows how one subscriber’s account accessed reports via a single device. The daily use profile with multiple colors shows how the other subscriber’s account accessed reports via five devices.Whereas the daily use profile with one color represents a loyal subscriber, the daily use profile with five colors is a prospect for an up-sell because of unmonetized demand of multiple users sharing one subscriber’s account. But how can you be sure the multi-color profile isn’t simply a raving fan? In paid content, one of the challenges for corporate sales is finding demand for content that can be monetized—finding a good lead. Our research shows one of the best sources for leads is within existing individual subscribers where several individuals are sharing access to the paid content. The charts below show a typical example of how to identify an individual subscriber that is a lead for an up-sell to a corporate or group agreement. The number two is a good start. In the hourly use profile for each account, the shared account has twice as many active hours as the individual account. Additionally, some devices are active earlier than other devices, but overlap on their activity which means they are used in different time zones. Also, note the individual account profile shows inactivity for lunch in the middle of the day. There are no low activity hours for the shared account, rather it peaks at the periods of most overlap between devices.Looking at the quarterly use profile, it becomes clear that each of the shared account devices were active throughout the period. Unlike the individual account which had ten inactive work-days during the period, the shared account had no inactive days.  Digging deeper into the quarterly profile, the shared account consumes three times the content as compared to the individual account. Matt Shanahan is senior vice president of marketing and strategy for Scout Analytics.last_img read more

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Veterans Invited To Free Breakfast At Wilmington United Methodist Church On November 10

first_imgWILMINGTON, MA — The Wilmington United Methodist Church (87 Church Street) is hosting a breakfast for all veterans to enjoy on Saturday, November 10, 2018 at 8am in Fellowship Hall. Come on by and enjoy the morning with free food and other veterans. RSVP with Susan at 978-658-4519.Like Wilmington Apple on Facebook. Follow Wilmington Apple on Twitter. Follow Wilmington Apple on Instagram. Subscribe to Wilmington Apple’s daily email newsletter HERE. Got a comment, question, photo, press release, or news tip? Email wilmingtonapple@gmail.com.Share this:TwitterFacebookLike this:Like Loading… RelatedIndian Classical Dance Workshop & Performance In Wilmington On August 23In “Community”SAVE THE DATE: Wilmington Methodist Church’s Annual Harvest & Holly Fair Set For October 26In “Community”Free Breakfasts For Veterans In Wilmington On November 10 & November 11In “Community”last_img read more

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Forensics Report Shows What Guns Are Mostly Used For In Harris County

first_img 00:00 /03:59 Listen DmyTo/Getty Images/iStockphotoLess than a month ago, Devin Kelley walked into a church in Sutherland Springs, Texas and opened fire killing 26 people.An armed neighbor wounded Kelley who later turned his gun on himself.State Attorney General Ken Paxton suggested on Fox News that good people with guns might stop the bad ones.“If it’s a place where somebody has the ability to carry there is also the opportunity that the gunman will be taken out before he has the opportunity to kill very many people,” Paxton said.But how often does that happen, that a bystander saves the day with a gun?That question was just one of many we wanted to look into. For some answers we talked with Ashraf Mozayani.“Very very low number you are looking that somebody protects themselves with the gun,” she said.How would Mozayani know?For years, she saw the result of gun fire first-hand when she worked at the medical examiner’s office. “I have been the lab director and chief toxicologist for Harris County Institute of Forensic Science or at that time we called the medical examiner’s office from 1996 to 2012,” she said.If someone died in Harris County and required an autopsy, Mozayani was a part of a team analyzing the report.“In any medical examiner office every morning you usually sit at the table and see every case that comes to the office,” she said.Mozayani said she rarely saw a report of a fatality where someone used a gun in defense.“It’s not that many and those people that are protecting themselves with a gun are usually well trained police officer or someone off duty,” she said.So, if people are rarely using guns for protection, how were they being used when someone was killed?We found the most recent statistics in the 2016 annual report from where Mozayani used to work, the Harris County Institute of Forensic Sciences.In Harris County last year, there were 478 homicides,  people killing other people.Knives, clubs, and strangulation were used in some but in the vast majority, a gun was the weapon,  accounting for 371 of those 478 homicides.In cases of people killing themselves, guns accounted for 285 of the 500 suicides in Harris County last year.“For the victims of suicide it is firearm,”Mozayani said. “It’s about 60 percent of them is firearm.”Mozayani pointed us to a particularly troubling stat, she says when children died from injuries in Harris County, the leading cause was a gun.Last year, guns killed 33 kids. That’s more than any other single cause, including drownings, even car accidents.Next, we asked Mozayani about exactly what kinds of guns are used in Harris County. “So pistols is about more than 60 percent of the cases that come to the lab,” she said.So, handguns as opposed to the semi-automatic rifles used in mass shootings including those in Sutherland Springs and Las Vegas.Mozayani says in the 16 years she worked in the medical examiner’s office, she never saw any cases near the horrific magnitude of those.It was instead a day-in-day-out continuous stream of gun-caused death.And how did that make Mozayani feel about guns?“I am a gun owner and that happened exactly after the Ike flood,” she said. “I was alone in the house. I was very very afraid.”So, she got a gun for protection.Mozayani said it just comes down to being a responsible gun owner.“It’s very important who has the gun and how to keep the gun and what kind of gun they have,”she said.Mozayani is now a professor of forensics at Texas Southern University.She  plans to have her PhD students do a study next year on trends in gun ownership and gun use in Houston. Share To embed this piece of audio in your site, please use this code: Xlast_img read more