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Pushing Back on Tariffs

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest By Chris ClaytonDTN Ag Policy EditorWILLIAMSBURG, Iowa (DTN) — Leaders of a major Iowa equipment manufacturer and Iowa farmers reiterated their calls Wednesday for President Donald Trump to remove tariffs against trading partners that have driven up the prices of steel and aluminum as well as retaliatory tariffs that are hurting farm exports.Sen. Joni Ernst, R-Ia., told business leaders and farmers at a roundtable discussion that she needed to hear their experiences so she could get the message to Washington, D.C. that the U.S.-Mexico-Canada Agreement (USMCA) must be ratified and tariffs against Canada and Mexico must be lifted.Roughly one-in-five jobs in Iowa is tied to trade, largely in agriculture. Wednesday’s event at Kinze Manufacturing in eastern Iowa was organized by the group Tariffs Hurt the Heartland and the Association of Equipment Manufacturers (AEM). Wednesday’s event was the 15th town hall around the Midwest as groups seek to rally support to drop tariffs.Dennis Slater, president of AEM, said tariffs equate to a tax and the tax is hitting U.S. businesses and consumers. “China is not paying the tax. We are paying the tax,” Slater said.Ernst said she did not see any serious sticking points that would prevent the USMCA from ratification. Congress right now is still waiting on the Trump administration to submit the trade deal to Congress, which then starts a timeline for votes on the trade agreement. The bill would begin in the House, where Ernst said she thinks House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., supports the USMCA.“The administration needs to be working with the House on how to get this through,” she said.Beyond the USMCA, there is equal angst about talks with China and the tariffs in place there. Last summer, President Trump imposed a 25% tariff on $50 billion worth of Chinese goods then followed up with a 10% tariff on $200 billion in goods. China has imposed tariffs on more than $110 billion in U.S. goods, including 25% tariffs on a range of agricultural products, including soybeans, and even higher tariffs on U.S. pork.Ernst said trade needs to go beyond “one-off” sales to China for products such as soybeans and pork. “We need long-term resolution and that means getting the trade deal done,” the senator said.Richard Dix, senior director of supply chain for Kinze, said the manufacturer has seen an unprecedented increase in the price of steel, which translates into higher prices for the planters, grain carts and tilling equipment Kinze makes. Then Kinze sees sales affected because farmers are worried about their own income going forward.“If they are insecure, they are not in the dealership,” Dix said. “If they aren’t in the dealership, then they aren’t buying our products.”Tariffs are having costs in a variety of ways. A study released this week by the University of Chicago and the Federal Reserve showed tariffs increased the costs for washers and dryers an average of $86 per washing machine and $92 per dryer. That added up to additional costs of $1.5 billion to consumers just for those products.Further, tariffs and higher metal prices are taking away options such as investing more money in the company or rewarding employees, Dix said. “We’re forced to make different decisions because money is being siphoned away from our company.“Our biggest fear is this becoming the new normal,” he added.Other business people in eastern Iowa told of companies losing business to European or Asian firms because of the steel and aluminum tariffs, or the tariffs placed on China. Jon Kinzenbaw, who founded Kinze, said he’s concerned about what could happen to Iowa land values because of persistent low farm prices and the effect that would have on farmers.“If we don’t get this thing turned around, I predict there will be a lot of farms and other things changing hands in the very near future,” Kinzenbaw said.Ernst said she disagrees with the way President Trump used a national-security section of an old trade law, “Section 232,” to place steel and aluminum tariffs on most trade partners, especially Canada and Mexico. Those countries retaliated and expected the tariffs to be lifted once the USMCA was negotiated. Right now, the tariffs remain in place and the Trump administration has not offered any details about lifting the Section 232 tariffs.“If there is a deal in place, and the USMCA is essentially done, then the tariffs need to be lifted,” Ernst said.Ernst is working on legislation that would require the Department of Defense to determine national security threats before such tariffs could be imposed in the future.Pam Johnson, former president of the National Corn Growers Association, said there is too much uncertainty about markets as farmers go to the fields this spring to plant a crop. She pointed to a recent University of Illinois analysis highlighting the losses farmers currently face planting either corn or soybeans.“I have never had to go into a season planting a crop with that in mind,” Johnson said.John Heisdorffer, former president of the American Soybean Association, told Ernst that U.S. farmers spent millions of dollars developing a trade relationship with China and he fears they may never get the market back like it was just over a year ago. Heisdorffer cited problems in the Dakotas trying to find a market for beans that would have been exported.“All of those funds seem like they have been lost because we are back where we started,” Heisdorffer said. Heisdorffer also talked about how much U.S. trade disputes have helped international competitors such as Brazil. “We more or less handed them our soybean exports because of the tariffs.”Ernst expressed confidence in the president on trade, especially the adoption of USMCA. “I think he is going to want to see this as a significant achievement of his administration,” she said.Chris Clayton can be reached at chris.clayton@dtn.comFollow him on Twitter @ChrisClaytonDTN(CZ/BE)© Copyright 2019 DTN/The Progressive Farmer. All rights reserved.last_img read more

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Helping Caregivers with Guilt

first_img Return to article. Long DescriptionWritten by: Mary Brintnall-Peterson, Ph.D., MBP Consulting, LLC, Professor Emeritus, UW-ExtensionAs a professional, you hear over and over again caregivers expressing how guilty they feel about something that happened or didn’t happen. Their guilt is told in stories of being unkind, ugly or short -tempered with their care receiver. They wish they hadn’t reacted the way they did, had been kinder, more loving or hadn’t done what they did. Their guilt surfaced as “what ifs,” “if only” and “should.”As someone who caregivers turn to for insights, you can help caregivers understand that guilt is natural.  It involves saying or doing something that causes someone to be hurt or wronged. Guilt occurs when they have some responsibility or control over the situation. It is a reactive emotion to something that happened in the past which violated the caregiver’s moral perspective. Guilt often bothers the caregiver for a long time and if not dealt with can cause sleepless nights, unhappiness and depression.Sometimes what a caregiver describes isn’t guilt, but regret. Regret is wishing that things or the situation could be different. It is a feeling of disappointment or distress when a situation is not the way they would like.  Here’s an example—a caregiver shares they are feeling guilty because John, her husband (recovering from an infected amputated leg), fell while she was at the grocery store. Did she cause John to fall? Was it because she went to the grocery store that John fell? The answer to both questions is no—she is feeling regret about John falling (not guilt) as she is distressed about the fall and wishes it hadn’t happened.Understanding GuiltAs you work with caregivers help them understand that guilt can be a painful emotion and too much can be destructive.  It’s critical for them to know whether they are feeling guilt or regret.The following two questions are key in determining if someone is feeling guilt:(1.) Is there a direct cause and affect relationship between what they did or didn’t do resulting in harm to the care receiver?(2.) Did they do something wrong or say something they shouldn’t have said that resulted in the care receiver being hurt?If the answer to these questions is yes, then they are experiencing guilt. So the next step is to find positive ways to react to their guilt.  Some suggestions include:Admit responsibility for what they did or said.Apologize and/or ask for forgiveness from the person they have hurt, harmed or wronged.Attempt to make the situation better.Talk with a friend who can help them come to terms with their feelings by being understanding and supportive.Identify and understand their responsibilities as a caregiver. Make sure they have realistic expectations of what they can and can’t do.Focus on what they have done that is positive, good and right. Doing this helps them counter balance their guilt feelings.Learn from their experience and try not to make the same mistake again.Realize they are human and make mistakes especially when under a lot of stress.Seek professional help if their guilt persists and consumes their thoughts.As a professional who works with caregivers be on the look-out for signs of caregivers dealing with guilt. Help them figure out whether they are feeling guilt or regret and how to deal with it.  The bottom line is help them understand that addressing their guilt is one way they care for themselves. Remind them they are not alone in their caregiver journey and to hang in there. This image was purchased by MFLNMC from iStock.com under member ID 8085767. last_img read more

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Digital Platform ePals Acquires Carus

first_imgIn order to aid its move into the home subscription market, educational digital platform ePals Corporation acquires Carus Publishing Company, along with its magazine, book and retail assets. Under terms of the deal, ePals will pay $5 million in cash and $10 million in stock and will merge Carus into an indirect subsidiary.Carus’ 2010 revenues were $16 million and EBITDA was just under $1 million. The company’s net loss in 2010 was about $270,000.Carus Publishing Company includes the Cricket Magazine Group, Cobblestone Publishing and Open Court Publishing divisions. The Cricket Magazine Group houses 14 titles for children aged up to 14 years. Consumer subscriptions total 300,000, with institutional subscriptions bringing in 80,000 subs. The acquisition also includes Carus’ Ladybug iPhone app, as well as a content licensing business with three localized Chinese publications.ePals, which went public earlier this year, will have ownership of 600,000 paid subscriptions upon completion of the acquisition; this in addition to 7 million registered users in classrooms and homes in over 200 countries and territories. The company’s current content partners include National Geographic and the Smithsonian Institute. ePals’s digital Global Community is represent by brands like email program SchoolMail, communication and collaboration tool LearningSpace and e-mentoring program In2Books. Carus launched in 1887. Its flagship magazine, Cricket, debuted in 1973. In addition to its magazine and book sector, Carus’ portfolio also includes crafts, toys and gifts.More on this topic Printer Launches Updatable Mobile Magazine App Service Paste Returns? Music Mag Acquired, Set to Relaunch as Digital Edition Hearst Completes U.K. Portion of Lagerdere Acquisition Digital Newsstand Zinio.com Reports 154 Percent Growth in Transactions Over 2005 (posted 10/18) Quebecor Finalizes $55M Reader’s Digest Deal Former Meredith Exec Joins National Journal as PresidentJust In The Atlantic Names New Global Marketing Head | People on the Move This Just In: Magazines Are Not TV Networks BabyCenter Sold to Ziff Davis Parent J2 Media | News & Notes Shanker Out, Litterick In as CEO of EnsembleIQ Meredith Corp. Makes Digital-Side Promotions | People on the Move Four More Execs Depart SourceMedia in Latest RestructuringPowered bylast_img read more

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Veterans Invited To Free Breakfast At Wilmington United Methodist Church On November 10

first_imgWILMINGTON, MA — The Wilmington United Methodist Church (87 Church Street) is hosting a breakfast for all veterans to enjoy on Saturday, November 10, 2018 at 8am in Fellowship Hall. Come on by and enjoy the morning with free food and other veterans. RSVP with Susan at 978-658-4519.Like Wilmington Apple on Facebook. Follow Wilmington Apple on Twitter. Follow Wilmington Apple on Instagram. Subscribe to Wilmington Apple’s daily email newsletter HERE. Got a comment, question, photo, press release, or news tip? Email wilmingtonapple@gmail.com.Share this:TwitterFacebookLike this:Like Loading… RelatedIndian Classical Dance Workshop & Performance In Wilmington On August 23In “Community”SAVE THE DATE: Wilmington Methodist Church’s Annual Harvest & Holly Fair Set For October 26In “Community”Free Breakfasts For Veterans In Wilmington On November 10 & November 11In “Community”last_img read more