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Quadcore Snapdragon S4 is firing up for laptop wars

first_img Explore further (PhysOrg.com) — Google is moving toward social; Facebook is moving to search; and now the chip kings are doing a similar dance into different territory. Intel is muscling in on smartphones and Qualcomm wants a big bite out of the laptop market. The news is that Qualcomm intends to place its quad-core Snapdragon S4 chips for Windows 8 laptops on the market later this year. Expectations are that, as Windows 8 launches in October, the Qualcomm chip laptops will be on board by the year’s end. News of the Qualcomm plan to make a dent in the laptop market was presented in PC World’s exchange with Qualcomm senior vice president, Rob Chandhok. Citation: Quad-core Snapdragon S4 is firing up for laptop wars (2012, April 3) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2012-04-quad-core-snapdragon-s4-laptop-wars.html Qualcomm Snapdragon chipset heads for tablets, TVs © 2012 PhysOrg.com In pacing this PC market push, Qualcomm already started shipping prototype Snapdragon-based Windows 8 machines to developers. The program combines a pre-release version of Windows on ARM with Snapdragon S4 test PCs. Qualcomm has become part of Microsoft’s Windows on ARM developer seeding program. The two companies are working on putting test PCs, SoC-loaded computers, in the hands of select developers, in an invitation-only program. The developers can test and optimize applications for Snapdragon-powered Windows on ARM PCs. Qualcomm’s Windows move will serve its intention to bite into Intel market share in the PC and tablet category. The Qualcomm selling point is that the Snapdragon S4 chip, with its 28nm architecture, will pave the way for vendors to issue skinny, light, powerful, yet power-efficient, laptops, head to head with Intel “ultrabooks.”Chandhok is also playing on the advantages of Snapdragon-based Windows 8 machines as very light. He seemed to be suggesting they will be surprisingly light. “We think much lighter than what Intel calls an ultrabook,” Chandhok said in the report. He noted that having a powerful Snapdragon chip with four CPU cores and multiple graphics cores will really enhance Windows 8 devices for applications such as games. Those outside Qualcomm are prepared to wait and see to what extent Snapdragon on Windows 8 will boost the company’s standing in ultrabook PCs, especially as to if and how Snapdragon S4 chips for Windows 8 laptops will outperform competing products with Intel on board.Until now, Qualcomm has been known as a manufacturer of chips for smartphones and tablets. They will be going up against competition not only from Intel but also from Nvidia and Texas Instruments. As several observers note, consumers can expect to have interesting choices in ultra-thin laptops as a result. This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.last_img read more

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Battery team gets a charge out of lignin

first_img Journal information: Science (Phys.org) — Creating energy from wood waste has progressed from novel idea to renewable energy work in development. Researchers from Poland and Sweden are using a waste product from the paper making process to develop a battery. That material is lignin. Olle Inganäs, professor of biomolecular and organic electronics at Linköping University in Sweden and Grzegorz Milczarek, a researcher at Poznań University of Technology in Poland, have completed a study that shows how it is done. They maintain that the insulating qualities of lignin derivatives can be combined with the conductivity of the polymer polypyrrole to create a composite material that effectively holds an electric charge. Lignin acts as the insulator and polypyrrole as a conductor, holding an electric charge. Lignin is the substance found in plants, and it is stripped out of wood as a waste product during the paper-making process. In the researchers’ paper, “Renewable Cathode Materials from Biopolymer/Conjugated Polymer Interpenetrating Networks” published in Science, the authors provide more details on lignin and their methods.”Brown liquor, the waste product from paper processing, contains lignin derivatives. Polymer cathodes can be prepared by electrochemical oxidation of pyrrole to polypyrrole in solutions of lignin derivatives. The quinone group in lignin is used for electron and proton storage and exchange during redox cycling, thus combining charge storage in lignin and polypyrrole in an interpenetrating polypyrrole/lignin composite.”A clear advantage of their discovery would be in the ready availability of a natural material such as lignin as opposed to dependence on metal oxides such as those used in lithium-ion batteries. The researchers themselves, however, emphasize that their work needs further and extensive study; they recognize this is not at a stage for industrial-style development.These rechargeable batteries are still limited, according to the researchers, because they slowly lose their electric charge as they sit idly. Milczarek and Inganäs also found that various lignin derivatives perform differently in the cathode, depending on how they are processed. With continued investigations, it may be possible to optimize the batteries. Another implication to a “wood” battery may be in cost, versus existing batteries, as there would not be a reliance on precious metals. “The advantage of using a renewable material for charge storage is the enormous amount of this material that is already being produced on Earth by growing plants, which contain about 20 to 30 percent lignin,” according to Inganas. “It is also a low-value material, currently being used for combustion. Lithium-ion batteries, on the other hand, require metal oxides and some of those materials, such as cobalt, are rather rare.”According to the International Lignin Institute, after cellulose, it is the most abundant renewable carbon source on Earth. Between 40 and 50 million tons per annum are produced worldwide as a mostly non-commercialized waste product. Lignin. Image: Wikipedia © 2012 Phys.org Battery cathode made of waste byproducts from paper industry promises sustainable energy storage Explore further Citation: Battery team gets a charge out of lignin (2012, August 17) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2012-08-battery-team-lignin.html This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.last_img read more

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Physical chemistry could answer many questions on fracking

first_img(Phys.org) —By some estimates, continued growth in hydraulic fracturing (or “fracking”/”fraccing”) could put the US on the path to self-sufficiency in energy over the next few decades. Yet despite the potential economic benefits, fracking has also generated controversy due to the unknown long-term consequences of all the drilling, pumping, fracturing, and extracting processes involved. Now, two scientists have identified several important scientific challenges encountered in fracking that can be addressed with physical chemistry, which could lead to improved fracking techniques. Journal information: Journal of Physical Chemistry Letters Citation: Physical chemistry could answer many questions on fracking (2013, March 5) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2013-03-physical-chemistry-fracking.html Other questions include how much natural gas is absorbed by the porous shale, how much natural gas (and other hydrocarbons) is present in source rocks, whether these can be produced, whether fracturing fluids can be designed to reduce the amount of salt and trace metals that are extracted along with the hydrocarbons, how proppants (additives used to “prop” open the fractures) change the flow properties of the hydrocarbons, how back-flow water is treated after it flows back to the surface, how to minimize natural gas and oil leaks at the surface to avoid contaminating aquifers, and many more. “We believe that proper fundamental investigations and attention in the application of the hydraulic fracturing technology will be able to limit the environmental impact of hydraulic fracturing,” Striolo said. “Although accidents can always happen, proper planning and attention to safety and environmental regulations will limit the likelihood of such events.”Essentially every stage of the fracking process poses fundamental questions, but Yethiraj and Striolo think that physical chemists, with collaboration from researchers in other fields, are capable of providing answers. Both scientists are currently investigating questions that could impact fracking in the future. Yethiraj and his group are developing models for water and aqueous solutions and investigating the static and dynamic properties of water-soluble polymers. Striolo has been investigating the thermodynamic and transport properties of aqueous systems confined in narrow pores. He is also participating in an international initiative (Deep Carbon Observatory https://dco.gl.ciw.edu), whose goal is to better understand the Earth’s carbon cycle. The results from these areas of research could help answer some of the questions highlighted in the commentary. Copyright 2013 Phys.org All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed in whole or part without the express written permission of Phys.org. English tremors blamed on shale ‘fracking’ The process of hydraulic fracturing involves drilling a vertical and horizontal well, which can allow the exploration of wide shale formations (up to 6,000 acres) with only a small surface pad (6 acres). Points A, B, C identify the locations for future research opportunities. Credit: Arun Yethiraj and Alberto Striolo, et al. ©2013 American Chemical Society Physical chemists Arun Yethiraj, a professor at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, and Alberto Striolo, an associate professor at the University of Oklahoma in Norman, have published an overview of how physical chemistry could lead to a better understanding of fracking in a guest commentary in The Journal of Physical Chemistry Letters. Over the past several years, fracking has become more widespread in the US as a relatively cheap way to produce natural gas and oil. The basic process involves drilling into the ground, first vertically and then horizontally; lining this well with a metal casing that contains small holes; and then pumping water (with some additives) into the well at high pressure, which flows through the holes and causes the surrounding rock to crack open. Out of the open cracks in the rock, fluids such as natural gas, oil, and about 10% of the pumped water can flow back to the well and be collected at the surface.While fracking is currently being used with commercial success, much is still unknown about the details of the process. In 2012, the US National Science Foundation funded a workshop on hydraulic shale fracturing that brought together scientists and engineers from a variety of backgrounds. In the new commentary, Yethiraj and Striolo draw upon the information from this workshop to address the fundamental scientific problems that arise in fracking, and briefly propose how they might be solved with tools from physical chemistry.”We attempted to outline many physical chemistry questions, to engage the broad community,” Striolo told Phys.org. “Every scientist can target a question of his/her personal interest. The impact on the development of the fracking technology, however, is likely to depend on a global systemic approach, where all aspects we pointed out, and others, are tackled together.”For instance, some of the big questions in fracking require a better understanding of the physical properties of fluids in shale, which could be addressed by methods that characterize the shale microstructure and nanostructure, as well as measurements that monitor changes in rock properties upon infiltration of fluids. And since only 10% of the water that was pumped into the well flows back out, where does the rest of it go? If the water is absorbed into the shale, how does it affect the rocks’ response to mechanical movement? Experimental data, computer simulations, coarse-grained models, and theoretical studies could help answer these questions. More information: Arun Yethiraj and Alberto Striolo. “Fracking: What Can Physical Chemistry Offer?” The Journal of Physical Chemistry Letters. DOI: 10.1021/jz4000141e This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Explore furtherlast_img read more

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Study shows solar powered sea slugs can survive long term in the

first_img This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. (Phys.org) —A team of researchers from Germany and the Netherlands has found that at least two species of sea slug thought to be able to endure long periods of starvation by gleaning energy from the sun has found that the slugs can live for long periods of time without food and with or without sunlight. In their paper published in Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences, the team describes experiments they conducted with the slugs and then outline their findings. The two types of sea slugs (Plakobranchus ocellatus and Elysia timida) survive by eating algae, but prior research has shown that the creature can survive very long periods of starvation. Because the slugs do not digest—at least right away—a specialized subunit of cells known as an organelle, that in the algae is responsible for photosynthesis, scientists have believed that the slugs were somehow gaining energy from the sun using the cells from the algae.To test this theory, the researchers subjected several of the sea slugs to long periods of starvation under three different conditions. One group of the slugs was kept in the dark without food—another group was kept in a sunlit enclosure but was also not given any food. A third group was given a chemical that inhibits photosynthesis and was then kept in a lighted enclosure, but was not given any food either. After 55 days the researchers pulled the slugs from their enclosures and studied them to learn if there were any differences among them. Surprisingly, the researchers could not find any. All the members of all three groups survived and all lost approximately the same amount of weight. A subsequent test showed just how durable the slugs really are—the researchers put six of them in a dark enclosure and didn’t feed them for 88 days—all of the slugs survived and even appeared healthy.The results of the study disprove the idea that the slugs somehow derive energy from the photosynthesizing cells they keep alive for long periods in their bodies. The researchers suggest that the slugs may instead be allowing the cells to remain alive for long periods of time, simply to eat them slowly as time passes. This means that the cells are apparently kept alive by the sun while in the slugs body—sort of an internal farming system, allowing the slugs to survive long starvation periods, which because they move so slowly, appears a necessary adaption to ensure survival. Explore further Exemplary images of P. ocellatus specimens. Image (i) shows a slug kept in the light and which was regularly fed, hence best representing natural conditions. Image (ii) shows a slug after 55 days of starvation in the dark. Credit: Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences, doi: 10.1098/rspb.2013.2493 More information: Plastid-bearing sea slugs fix CO2 in the light but do not require photosynthesis to survive, Published 20 November 2013 DOI: 10.1098/rspb.2013.2493AbstractSeveral sacoglossan sea slugs (Plakobranchoidea) feed upon plastids of large unicellular algae. Four species—called long-term retention (LtR) species—are known to sequester ingested plastids within specialized cells of the digestive gland. There, the stolen plastids (kleptoplasts) remain photosynthetically active for several months, during which time LtR species can survive without additional food uptake. Kleptoplast longevity has long been puzzling, because the slugs do not sequester algal nuclei that could support photosystem maintenance. It is widely assumed that the slugs survive starvation by means of kleptoplast photosynthesis, yet direct evidence to support that view is lacking. We show that two LtR plakobranchids, Elysia timida and Plakobranchus ocellatus, incorporate 14CO2 into acid-stable products 60- and 64-fold more rapidly in the light than in the dark, respectively. Despite this light-dependent CO2 fixation ability, light is, surprisingly, not essential for the slugs to survive starvation. LtR animals survived several months of starvation (i) in complete darkness and (ii) in the light in the presence of the photosynthesis inhibitor monolinuron, all while not losing weight faster than the control animals. Contrary to current views, sacoglossan kleptoplasts seem to be slowly digested food reserves, not a source of solar power.center_img © 2013 Phys.org Journal information: Proceedings of the Royal Society B Citation: Study shows ‘solar powered’ sea slugs can survive long term in the dark (2013, November 20) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2013-11-solar-powered-sea-slugs-survive.html Researchers discover sea slugs that stab each other in the head after copulation (w/ Video)last_img read more

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Plasmonic pixels could be used to make nonfading paint

first_imgColor mixing test pattern of in-focus and out-of-focus images showing the saturation and brightness control of the plasmonic pixel design algorithm. Credit: James et al. ©2016 American Chemical Society The new plasmonic pixel images are made of arrays of aluminum nanoantennas that each produce a specific color by selectively absorbing or reflecting different wavelengths of light. The length of the nanoantenna determines its color, while the gap between each nanoantenna and the substrate determines its color saturation. Another unique characteristic of the plasmonic-pixel-based image is that it is polarization-tunable. By changing the polarization, or the direction in which the light waves oscillate, the color can essentially be switched “on and off.” This makes it possible to easily fabricate either color or grayscale images. The researchers plan to make further improvements to the plasmonic pixel concept in the future.”The immediate goals are further refining the algorithm to increase the color gamut and saturation, and to investigate the scaled-up fabrication of large-area plasmonic pixel devices with nano-imprint lithography,” James said. This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. (a) A 1.5-cm-long image produced by plasmonic pixels. This photograph was taken in 1975 by Mervyn Bishop of Australian Prime Minister Gough Whitlam pouring sand into the hand of the leader of the Gurindji communities, Vincent Lingiari, symbolically handing the Wave Hill station back to the Gurindji people. (b) Image taken with polarizer aligned to x-axis. (c) Image taken with polarizer aligned to y-axis. Credit: the Art Gallery of New South Wales More information: Timothy D. James et al. “The Plasmonic Pixel: Large Area, Wide Gamut Color Reproduction Using Aluminum Nanostructures.” Nano Letters. DOI: 10.1021/acs.nanolett.6b01250 Journal information: Nano Letters Aluminum nanoparticles could improve electronic displays Citation: Plasmonic pixels could be used to make non-fading paint (2016, May 30) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2016-05-plasmonic-pixels-non-fading.html © 2016 Phys.org In a new paper published in Nano Letters, Timothy D. James, Paul Mulvaney, and Ann Roberts at The University of Melbourne have demonstrated a new plasmonic pixel design that addresses several of the critical problems facing plasmonic color images, including a limited number of colors, small image size, and difficulty in creating accurate colors without using complex color-mapping algorithms. The new plasmonic pixel design uses an algorithm that can produce nearly 2000 different colors and shades and achieve a resolution that exceeds the resolution limit of the human eye. To demonstrate, the researchers fabricated a 1.5-cm-long image (which is relatively large compared to previous plasmonic images), and showed that colors could be accurately reproduced using a straightforward color-mapping algorithm. Although other areas of plasmonics research may have potential applications as displays for phones and TVs, this plasmonic pixel produces a static image, where the color and structure are set at the time of fabrication and can’t be altered.”The potential applications for the plasmonic pixel (and other color-producing nanostructures in this research space) would be as an industrial paint on cars, buildings, advertising billboards, etc., as the plasmonic pixels will never fade,” James told Phys.org. “With the ability to print at resolutions greater than conventional pigment-based processes, the plasmonic pixels may also have applications in security-based devices for use on high-value product packaging, medicines, etc.” As the researchers explain in their paper, printed images are just one application of plasmonics research. Other plasmonic structures are already being used in sensors, light sources, and photovoltaics. All of these applications are based on the same general concept of plasmons, which are basically large masses of electrons that move together under an applied electric field. The most common plasmonic materials are gold and silver, but aluminum is the more practical candidate for large-scale applications because of its natural abundance and low cost. (Phys.org)—Researchers are developing a technology that could one day make paint and color packaging labels that never fade. The color is produced by a type of nanostructure called a “plasmonic pixel.” These pixels are made of aluminum nanoantennas, and when the free electrons in the metal collectively vibrate at specific frequencies, they produce a specific color. Explore furtherlast_img read more

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Gods not dead as yet

God, is he an entity in real or merely a myth? This question has dogged mankind for long. Carrying forward the doubt-belief system, the play Krishan Vs Kanhaiya questions your faith, in the spiritual and ritual sense, in God.An adaptation of the Gujarati play Kanji Virudh Kanji, the drama satirically narrates a tale which revolves around an altercation between an atheist and god. Directed by Umesh Shukla, it casts Paresh Rawal in a pivotal role as the atheist Krishna alongwith Chirag Vora, Jimit Trivedi, Puja Gupta, Ankit Trivedi among others. Also Read – ‘Playing Jojo was emotionally exhausting’After an earthquake ravages his antique shop, Krishanlal Mehta asks the insurance company to pay the damages. However, he is in for a rude shock when the insurance company doesn’t give him the money because the disaster is not man-made but ‘made by god’. That seals it for Krishan and he decides to file a case against god himself.What follows is a very intelligent, deeply thought out and well-argued case for and against the existence of god, the role of multi-billion religious trusts, how the common man has become ‘god fearing’ rather than ‘god loving’ and the fallacies of insurance. The arguments in the court between Krishan, and god, Kanhaiya are both hilarious and raise questions about religious faith. Also Read – Leslie doing new comedy special with NetflixTo add a twist to the tale, Kanhaiya — the Lord himself — presents himself to Krishan and through witty dialogues and smart arguments gets him to see the truth about God, taking him on a journey wherein the atheist gets converted to a hardcore believer.The writer, Bhavesh Mandaliya, does an incredible job adding humour to a serious plot. The play’s focus isn’t on showing an atheist’s conversion to someone religious, rather it is about the arguments raised for and against one’s belief in a higher power. The director, Umesh Shukla, uses the script to bring that idea out through the lighting effects and stage design. Similarly Paresh Rawal’s comic timing and punches are sharp as a shooter’s and hits the bull’s eye. The length of the play- two hours and 15 minutes could have probably been reduced. read more

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The return of Moti

first_imgAn art deco setup, palatial facade, grand golden chandeliers – it has none of it, yet this humble cinema hall set in the by lanes of Chandni Chowk came into limelight in the last one week-  the week was drenched in despair. It had run into trouble over the issue of its annual license renewal that expired on 31 March. ‘It took longer to get no objection certificates but shutting it down was never in question’ says the manager,’ VK Garg.  A tall and stout man stops me quizzically at the gate of the hall. ‘Now, Moti cinema is functional. There’s no problem anymore’, says Raj Narain, the security guard at the cinema. Wondering why I was there now, he added that the cinema experienced a rather unusual footfall last week.  Journalists from national media thronged to cover the demise of Moti. It’s ironical how single screen theatres get coverage over their demise; media writes panegyrics, evoking the nostalgia of their golden past but the same monumental halls seem invisible while functional. This Thursday night, with an impromptu screening of Also Read – ‘Playing Jojo was emotionally exhausting’Aatish – a 1994 Sanjay Dutt starrer movie – Moti bounced back to life. Before it goes into oblivion once again, we trace its past and understand its present. The alleyway leading to Moti is flanked with a huge hoarding of Jo Jeeta wahi Baazigar, a Tamil movie dubbed in Hindi, running these days. A man in his mid sixties, Shiv Kumar Jaiswal sits in the projector room with an air of boredom surrounding him. ‘I miss working manually on a projector’, he says pointing to the brand new UFO machine installed in the cinema five months ago. Like other big cinemas, this machine can load up a movie from Mumbai through satellites. He has worked as a projectionist for a good four decades. Though happy with the new technology, he ruminates the loss of ‘actually’ playing with reams of film prints. Also Read – Leslie doing new comedy special with NetflixIn his reverie, he exclaims, there were times when he used to queue up to watch a Raj Kapoor movie. The queues used to extend almost till Lal Quila. ‘Imagine a movie running for 52 weeks straight!’ he says with a gleam in his eyes. These days Moti hardly plays Hindi movies; their target audience now are the Poorvanchalis and Bhojpuri movie goers. ‘Our audience loves action, so we run Bhojpuri, Tamil- Telugu dubbed movies and some old Bollywood movies in between to match their interests.’  Going through his yellowing note book, he tells me that Moti didn’t even play the mass entertainer Dabbang. But movies like Wanted, Zilla Ghaziabad and Son of Sardar had a five week successful run.A cat comfortably settles and purrs by in the night shift’s manager room. Suresh Kumar goes back to the halcyon days of Moti. Established around the 1940’s, the cinema had its heydays when Raj Kapoor used to come down to screen his movies here. ‘With the coming of PVR’s in 90’s, we had to switch genres. Nobody was ready to play a Bhojpuri movie Susra Bada Paise Wala a decade back,’ says the manager. They took the risk of playing it and got good returns. Now, they boast of hosting Bhojpuri artists like Ravi Kishen. The security guard Raj Narain chips in, ‘But we also had Ranbir and Nargis here for the shoot of Rockstar,’ sounding outraged for missing out on his foray into movies. He shared screen with the actors for the scene where Moti turned into Amar Talkies for fulfilling one of Heer’s wild dreams to watch Junglee Jawani in Imtiaz Ali’s 2011 blockbuster. All said and done, Moti takes on a new lease of life; showcasing the same genre of movies, offering tickets between the same 30-60 rupees range and the same salted popcorn. And they have no plans of renovating. Why not give single screen a chance before they really fades into history?ALIVE AND KICKING IN THE VICINITYREGAL CINEMA, CP, Amar Kumar Singh Verma, serves as an accountant at Regal since 1977. He gushes, ‘Whoever comes to talk about Regal is sent over to me. Its not viable for a single screen like us to work anymore. But being a point of confluence in CP, youngsters still come down to watch movies here.’ He added that foreigners visit it for its heritage value in Delhi. In those days, a full house was a routine but now its a rare phenomenon. Disappointedly he quipped, ‘Regal witnessed its last housefull on 26 January, this year.’ From Prithiviraj Kapoor’s theatre to latest bollywood movies, Regal has seen it all since 1932. A chequered hall leading to a passage filled with black and white pictures of the yesteryears stars, Regal is a piece of history.  DETAILCapacity: 658 SEATSPrice Range: Rs 50-120Technology: Uses UFO for loading movies from July 2012GOLCHA CINEMA, DARYAGANJ, Established in 1954, it is designed in art deco style of 1950’s. NR Saini, the DGM says ‘ We feature family dramas so are target audience are families ever since we opened’. DETAILCapacity: 689 Price Range: Rs 50- 120 Technology: adopted UFO 2 months agoSHEILA CINEMA, PAHARGANJ, Established in 1960 showcases both Bollywood and Hollywood movies. Its target audience varies from youngsters to foreigners inhabiting the area around, says the manager, Prakash Dubey. He adds, ‘With the rise of affordable hotels and restaurants for tourists around Paharganj, Sheila saw a rise in numbers of foreigners visiting it’. He is hopeful of a better season at the hall when IPL matches get over.DETAILCapacity: 980 Price Range: 60-120 Technology: UFO since the last 10 yearslast_img read more

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Chase your dream

first_imgDelhi is going to witness an education fair with eleven leading Russian government medical and engineering universities participating in it. The fair will further move to other metro cities of India – Kolkata (8 May) and Chennai (10-11 May) at Russian Centre for Science and Culture. The fair is aimed at informing students about the availability of the options available in Russia’s top Universities and Academies. It will serve as a one stop solution for all education queries and opportunities available in Russia at undergraduate and post graduate level. The students and their parents can interact directly with faculty and international representatives of the universities. Also Read – ‘Playing Jojo was emotionally exhausting’Russian institutions of higher learning from different cities in Russia are targeting Indian high school graduates in this fair. These include the Tver State Medical Academy, Moscow Higher School of Economics, Gubkin Russian State University of Oil and Gas, Kazan Federal University, Southern Federal University, Kuban State Technological University and many more.When: 7 MayWhere: Russian Centre for Science and Culture, Mandi Houselast_img read more

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Mamata hands over job appointment letters to wives of Iraq victims from

first_imgKolkata: Chief Minister Mamata Banerjee handed over appointment letters of jobs to the next of kin of the two persons from Nadia, who were killed in Iraq.The state government has also given a financial assistance of Rs 5 lakh to each of the families and assured further help to them.The two of them are out of the 39 people from India who fell victim to the gruesome killing by the IS in Iraq. Both the victims were residents of Nadia district. Khokan Sikdar was a resident of Tehatta Chitka village, while Samar Thikadar was a resident of Chapra Mahakhola. Their mortal remains had been brought to their villages on Tuesday. Also Read – Heavy rain hits traffic, flightsFamily members of the victims visited the state secretariat Nabanna on Friday. The Chief Minister handed over the appointment letters for job in home guard to Khokan’s wife Namita Sikdar and Samar’s wife Dipali Thikadar.Dipali’s daughter Sharmistha was also accompanying her. Namita also came along with her son Abhra and daughter Gita, who is a BA student at present.After speaking to the bereaved family members, the Chief Minister accompanied them when they were leaving the state secretariat. They were assured all support by the state government for studies of their children and even if they need any other sort of help. Sources said that they have requested if it would be possible for her to give them jobs in some other department, instead of home guards.It may recalled that on the day when all hopes of the family members of Khokan and Samar came to an end, following the announcement of External Affairs minister Sushma Swaraj on March 20, the Chief Minister had tweeted: “Deeply saddened and shocked by the very sad news from #Mosul. Words are not enough to console the 39 grieving families. Our thoughts and prayers are with them”.last_img read more

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Two countries one Independence Day celebration

first_imgAs India and South Korea celebrate their Independence Day on the same date, both the countries came together for the celebrations at Siri Fort Auditorium. Nehru Bal Sangh (NBS) conducted the 5th edition of their entertaining extravaganza, Jashn-E-Azadi event where the artists from South Korea and India displayed their rich and diverse cultures. The programme showcased dance performances, audio-visual elements and musical renditions which narrated the story of Independence Day in an utterly creative way. Also Read – Add new books to your shelfStudents from various schools and eminent personalities from different fields including Vinay Pathak – Indian film actor, Lee Haekwang, and Acting Ambassador of the Republic of Korea, Kim Kum Pyoung, and Director at Korean Cultural Centre India, Shiela Dixit, Former CM of Delhi and Patron of Jashn-E-Azadi, Ashok Sahota, National President, Nehru Bal Sangh witnessed the performances.Lee Haekwang, Acting Ambassador of the Republic of Korea, said, “India is very big country, with so many ethnic groups and languages. This event gave me a chance to renew my historical knowledge. I hope this event helps in strengthening India – Korea relations”Ashok Sahota, President of Nehru Bal Sangh, said that “Indian freedom history is full of sacrifices. We should celebrate this day with zeal, enthusiasm and pride. Since it is a big day for all of us, we decided to have a joint celebration with South Korea this year” On the occasion, Kim Kum Pyoung sent his message: “Jashn-e-Azadi is an effort to spread the values of love, patriotism, and national unity.”The initiative was to rejuvenate the feelings of liberty and Independence among the youngsters. Also it was intended to encourage people to celebrate the Independence Day with much more enthusiasm, zeal, energy and pride, and not consider the festival as a mere holiday or vacation.last_img read more

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