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Celebrity chef cooks up Marylebone treat

first_imgTo access this article REGISTER NOWWould you like print copies, app and digital replica access too? SUBSCRIBE for as little as £5 per week. Would you like to read more?Register for free to finish this article.Sign up now for the following benefits:Four FREE articles of your choice per monthBreaking news, comment and analysis from industry experts as it happensChoose from our portfolio of email newsletterslast_img

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Retail: Broad sword

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Centre of retention

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Ronaldo extends scoring streak to keep Juve ahead of Inter, Lazio

first_imgCristiano Ronaldo stretched his scoring streak to nine consecutive league games with a penalty double as Serie A leaders Juventus bounced back from their defeat by Napoli with a 3-0 win over Fiorentina, whose owner said Sunday’s result left him feeling “disgusted”.But title rivals Inter Milan and Lazio also got back to winning ways, with Romelu Lukaku and Ciro Immobile bagging a brace apiece for their respective teams to keep the pressure on the eight-time defending champions.Juventus hold a three-point lead over second-placed Inter Milan, who beat Udinese 2-0. Lazio are a further two points adrift, with a game in hand, after top-scorer Immobile and Felipe Caicedo both scored twice in a 5-1 thrashing of rock-bottom SPAL.Ronaldo slotted in his goals in either half in Turin, with Dutch defender Matthijs de Ligt heading in a third in injury time.”Good to get back to victories and happy to score again in our stadium! Proud to reach 50 goals with the bianconeri shirt!,” Ronaldo wrote on Twitter.Juventus had fallen to just their second defeat of the season last weekend at coach Maurizio Sarri’s former club Napoli. Fiorentina president Rocco Commisso was furious at the penalty decisions that condemned his 14th-placed team.”I am disgusted with what I saw today,” blasted the Italian-born US businessman who bought the Tuscany club last year.”Juve are very strong, a team with a wage bill of 350 million doesn’t need help. Referees cannot decide matches.”Today they gave two penalties against us, maybe the first was there but the second certainly wasn’t.”Juventus vice-president Pavel Nedved hit back, declaring he was “a bit fed up of these controversies”.”Juve won with merit. Teams have to stop trying to look for excuses and accept defeat.”Ronaldo, 34, slotted in the opener five minutes before the break after German Pezzella’s handball was confirmed by VAR.His second came 10 minutes from time for a disputed Federico Ceccherini foul on Rodrigo Bentancur, making it 14 goals in nine games to bring his tally to 19 in Serie A this season, including seven penalties.He also becomes the first Juventus player to score in nine straight league games since David Trezeguet in December 2005.The former Real Madrid player has now scored 50 goals in 70 games since moving to Juventus in 2018.- ‘Great fight’ -Ronaldo is second only in the goalscoring charts this season to Immobile who now has 25 goals after Lazio kept alive their push for a first Scudetto since 2000.Immobile volleyed in on just three minutes, with Caicedo scoring a rebound less than quarter of an hour later.Immobile’s second came before the half-hour mark and he then played a role in Caicedo’s second seven minutes before the break.Substitute Bobby Adekanye came on after the break with the former Liverpool youngster tapping in his first Serie A goal.”Caicedo, Immobile and (Joaquin) Correa are untouchable,” said Lazio coach Simone Inzaghi, whose side could move second when they play their postponed match against Hellas Verona next Wednesday.In Udine, Lukaku grabbed a double to bring his tally to 16 league goals and get Antonio Conte’s side back on track after three consecutive 1-1 draws.The former Manchester United striker collected Nicolo Barella’s pass and curled an excellent finish through the legs of Udinese defender Bram Nuytinck in the 64th minute.And he added a second from the penalty spot seven minutes later when Udinese goalkeeper Juan Musso rushed out to fell Alexis Sanchez in the box.”It’s a great fight at the top,” said Lukaku. “It’s important for us to be up there too as we have a huge clash with Milan coming up.”Atalanta moved fourth despite being held 2-2 by struggling Genoa, jumping ahead of Roma on head-to-head record, after the capital side fell 4-2 at Sassuolo on Saturday.Zlatan Ibrahimovic missed Milan’s game with flu, with the eighth-placed northerners held 1-1 by 10-man Verona.Torino plunged further into crisis, following last weekend’s seven-goal thrashing by Atalanta with a 4-0 defeat by lowly Lecce.Topics :last_img read more

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US health workers exposed to virus without protective gear: Reports

first_imgThe Washington Post said the whistleblower had decades of field experience and received two department awards from health secretary Alex Azar last year.The deployments took place in late January and early February, the newspaper said.Afterwards, the workers returned to their normal duties, some taking commercial flights back to their offices around the country.US President Donald Trump has downplayed the potential spread of the novel coronavirus in the country, a message seemingly at odds with senior public health officials who have urged Americans to prepare to cancel mass gatherings and work from home. As of Wednesday, there are a total of 61 confirmed cases in the US, including 46 of which relate to people repatriated from abroad. Topics : Travis Air Force Base is in Solano County, where the first US patient for whom the source of new coronavirus infection could not be immediately identified is from.That case appears to be the first of so-called “community spread,” signaling a new phase in the battle against the virus in the US.The complaint said the HHS staff were sent into quarantined areas in the two bases, including a hangar where the evacuees were being received. At times, these teams worked alongside personnel from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention who wore “full gown, gloves and hazmat attire,” the complaint said. Federal health employees were sent to interact with repatriated Americans quarantined for exposure to the novel coronavirus without wearing protective gear or receiving training, a whistleblower complaint cited by US media said Thursday.The filing, which was seen by the Washington Post and New York Times, was submitted by a senior official in the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) who said she was improperly re-assigned after raising her concerns and threatened with being fired if she did not comply.According to the two newspapers, the incidents were in relation to two California air force bases, Travis and March. More than a dozen workers were sent to each site. last_img read more

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Indonesia, Netherlands sign US$1b worth of deals during Dutch king visit

first_imgEditor’s note: This article’s paragraph five has been revised to state that Shell’s investment in Indonesian will be in the downstream oil and gas industry. Topics : Read also: BREAKING: Dutch monarch offers apology for past ‘excessive violence’Indonesian Foreign Minister Retno Marsudi confirmed the deal, saying that the cooperation included, among others, the development of fuel storage tankers for Royal Vopak, Dutch logistics and distribution service providers to the chemical and oil industry, at the Tanjung Priok Port in Jakarta.Other collaborations areas include the development of Dutch dairy company FrieslandCampina’s milk factory and Shell’s investment in the Indonesian downstream oil and gas industry.Retno went on to say that the Dutch monarchs were accompanied by around 185 Dutch businesspeople who were slated to meet up with their Indonesian partners while the king and queen made their visit to Yogyakarta.  Read also: Dutch king offers condolences for advance team speedboat collision that led to seven deathsThe Netherlands was Indonesia’s fifth largest foreign investor last year, after having injected US$2.59 billion into Asia’s third largest economy, according to Indonesia’s Coordinating Investment Board (BKPM).The foreign minister went on to say that Indonesia and the Netherlands had signed letters of intent (LoI) for cooperations that covered women empowerment, water management, healthcare professionals, climate change, waste management and transportation.The two countries signed an LoI for cooperation on infectious disease control, including on antimicrobial resistance, which would involve the the Netherland’s Erasmus University Medical Center and Indonesia’s Sulianti Saroso Infectious Diseases Hospital (RSPI), she added. Indonesia and the Netherlands have inked US$1 billion worth of business deals covering wide-ranging areas of cooperation during the visit of Dutch King Willem-Alexander and Queen Maxima to the country.President Joko “Jokowi” Widodo welcomed the Dutch monarchs at the Bogor Palace in West Java on Tuesday, which marked the first day of the king’s four-day state visit to Indonesia. “We have forged a number of business-related cooperation areas amounting to up to US$1 million,” Jokowi said in a joint press statement following a bilateral meeting with the Dutch delegation.last_img read more

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Faulty virus tests cloud China’s European outreach over COVID-19

first_imgTopics : Whatever the intention, complaints in Spanish media increased as it transpired last week that 50,000 quick-testing kits from China were faulty and had to be returned. Deaths in Spain have begun to match those in nearby Italy — currently the virus’s epicenter in Europe.In fact, the sort of rapid coronavirus tests the countries bought are still unproven. If they can be shown to work, they offer the potential to vastly accelerate testing and get a better picture of how widely the disease has spread in society. But companies have only recently developed them and some experts warn governments to hold off on buying big supplies until it’s clearer which, if any, of the diagnostic tools work best.Criticism of China from other countries has been muted, likely reflecting its growing economic and strategic heft. Under the banner of a trade and infrastructure initiative known as Belt and Road, Beijing has moved to increasingly knit the fortunes of other countries to itself. Indeed President Xi Jinping has described China’s mass deployment of medical assistance to countries including Italy, Greece and France as an effort to further a “Health Silk Road.”In the Czech Republic, health-care authorities and some government members said the 300,000 quick tests purchased by the state only worked if patients had been infected for at least five days, while about a third were defective. President Milos Zeman, however, avoided mentioning the problems.“I’d like to thank the Chinese People’s Republic for being the only country that helped us in supplying the material,” he said March 19. In doing so, he failed to acknowledge aid also being provided by the European Union.In Turkey, which imported its first batch of “several thousand” kits in early March, officials determined an accuracy rate of less than 35%, according to a senior official with direct knowledge of the matter. Their use was immediately suspended and new tests sourced from a different Chinese supplier. They arrived last week and had an accuracy rate of about 90%, according to the Turkish official.China is trumpeting a victory over the virus to mount a major diplomatic offensive with Western nations to varying degrees immobilized and distracted, according to Tim Huxley, executive director for Asia at the International Institute for Strategic Studies. Still, “their dissimulation over COVID-19 numbers at home, the fact that much of the world continues to see China as the source of COVID-19, and tactical errors like providing shoddy test kits to some European countries means that their net diplomatic benefits may be limited,” he said.China said it’s working to rectify the problems. From Wednesday, exporters of coronavirus test kits, medical masks, protective clothing, ventilators and infrared thermometers must show they’re certified in China and promise their products also meet the quality standards of the importing nation or region, according to a Ministry of Commerce statement. The customs administration will only allow these goods to be exported if they’re approved by China’s regulators, the ministry said. The agency pledged Monday to improve supervision and crackdown on fake and poor quality medical exports.China isn’t the only country to see some of its virus assistance backfire in Europe.President Vladimir Putin dispatched protective masks, ventilators, testing equipment and even doctors to Italy this month, with deliveries carrying stickers saying “From Russia with Love.” A few days later, however, Italy’s La Stampa newspaper cited senior political sources as saying that about four-fifths of supplies were “useless” for the country.Many interpreted Russia’s actions as an opportunist bid to win friends in Italy as the EU’s own virus response foundered. Similar accusations have been leveled against China.Chinese telecommunications giant Huawei last week halted donations of face masks to countries including Italy, Ireland, Poland and the Netherlands following comments from EU foreign-policy chief Josep Borrell, who referred to a “global battle of narratives.”“China is aggressively pushing the message that, unlike the US, it’s a responsible and reliable partner,” he wrote in a blog post. That, he said, meant a “politics of generosity” battle was unfolding. Matovic may have an ax to grind as the testing kits were purchased by the previous government, of which he has been a fierce critic for many things, including its record on fighting corruption. Still, similar difficulties have cropped up from Madrid to Istanbul — complicating countries’ efforts to get a handle on the virus and re-open their economies, which are headed for recessions that could eclipse the fallout from the 2008 financial meltdown.The issues aren’t just a problem for Europe. They risk derailing China’s own efforts to fill the void left as President Donald Trump steers the US away from its traditional leadership role in times of global crisis. Beijing hopes to win favor through mass deliveries of medical aid to European nations — part of wider geopolitical ambitions in the region that go back years.Regarding the virus-testing kits, China said Slovakia used them incorrectly, and cautioned against politicizing instances where equipment isn’t up to scratch — issues it said it experienced when receiving help from abroad during the initial emergence of the virus months ago in Wuhan.“Problems should be properly solved based on facts, not political interpretations,” Foreign Ministry spokeswoman Hua Chunying said. “In fact, when we first began fighting COVID-19 at home, some of the assistance China received was defective, but we chose to believe and respect the kind intentions of these countries.”center_img As the coronavirus landed in Italy and began to sweep across the continent, European leaders turned to China for testing kits to quickly identify infection hot spots.Some are already regretting it.The 1.2 million Chinese antibody tests that the Slovak government bought from local middlemen for 15 million euros ($16 million) are inaccurate and unable to detect COVID-19 in its early stages, according to Prime Minister Igor Matovic, who only took office last month. “We have a ton and no use for them,” he said. They should “just be thrown straight into the Danube.”last_img read more

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Government braces for increasing medical waste during pandemic

first_imgAs medical workers treat more and more COVID-19 patients, concerns are growing over how to deal with the medical waste that is expected to pile up.The virus spreads from people to people through droplets from infected persons. It is unclear how long the virus from the droplets survives on surfaces, but various studies suggest it may persist up to 72 hours on hard shiny surfaces and up to 24 hours on porous surfaces depending on the temperature and humidity.According to data from the Health Ministry, 2,820 hospitals and 9,884 community health centers (Puskesmas) in Indonesia produce up to 290 tons of medical waste every day. There are 10 licensed medical waste processing plants in Indonesia with a total combined capacity of 170 tons of waste per day, meanwhile only 87 hospitals have incinerators to process waste on site, with a combined daily capacity of up to 60 tons. It recommends methods to dispose of waste from health centers, waste from people under surveillance (ODP) under home care and regular household waste with disposable face masks and other protective gear.It says that “infectious waste” from health facilities must be collected from closed containers at least once every two days. The waste must later be destroyed using an incinerator or autoclave with a shredder function. The residue left after the processing must be labeled as hazardous waste (B3) to be later transported to a hazardous waste processing plant.Activists have warned that excessive use of incinerators might contribute to air pollution, but the ministry said it was the most efficient technology so far to process the potentially infectious medical waste.“Therefore, the incinerators must also be equipped with air pollution control devices so the emissions produced are still in accordance with prevailing standards,” Rosa said.The Environment and Forestry Ministry is assisting the Health Ministry in preparing hospitals for better disposal of COVID-19 medical waste.It has also urged people to take care of their own waste, especially single-use face masks, which should be disposed of properly by tearing or cutting them before throwing them into a closed container to prevent them from being reused.Read also: No licenses needed to import medical equipment, protective gear until June: Trade MinistryJakarta, which has recorded the most cases of COVID-19 to date, has placed special bins for used masks in temporary disposal sites (TPS) across the city, in line with the environment ministry’s recommendation.“As for residents using disposable face masks, they should place the used masks in a separate container — which would then be collected by sanitation workers and then processed or demolished by a third party hazardous waste processor,” the Jakarta Environment Agency’s hazardous waste division head, Rosa Ambarwati, said.In West Java, authorities have enlisted PT Jasa Medivest, a company specializing in medical waste disposal and a subsidiary of province-owned PT Jasa Sarana, to process medical waste produced across the province.West Java Health Agency head Berli Hamdani Gelung Sakti has also called on residents to properly dispose of face masks and gloves to prevent infection.Read also: Two hospital directors die of COVID-19 as Indonesian doctors call for transparencyBut activists are adamant that burning medical waste could harm the environment.“Not all medical waste should be burned in incinerators, and it could increase dioxin and furan air pollutants that can cause cancer,” Daru Setyorini of the Environmental Conservation Organization (ECOTON) said. “The Health Ministry could increase use of autoclaves for medical waste like gloves, hazmat suits, IV [intravenous solution] bottles and face masks.”Yuyun Ismawati of environmental health NGO the Bali Fokus/Nexus3 Foundation said “misconceptions” about methods of onsite waste processing at healthcare centers were rampant, with many people assuming that all medical waste must be burned immediately.The organization found that only 69 hospitals in 19 provinces had permits to process hazardous waste. Of the number, 23 hospitals are in East Java, followed by West Java, Central Java and Jakarta with five hospitals each. North Sumatra, East Kalimantan, South Kalimantan and South Sulawesi each have four, and the remaining provinces have one to three such hospitals each. Although they have the permits to process hazardous medical waste, not all of them have incinerators.The organization also found that most medical waste management companies were actually waste transporters.“Waste processing facilities are still concentrated on Java. A lack of commitment from local administrations, poor oversight and a lack of funds contribute to this problem,” Yuyun said.There is no evidence so far that direct, unprotected human contact during the handling of healthcare waste has resulted in the transmission of the COVID-19 virus, the World Health Organization (WHO) said in its interim guidelines. The WHO guidelines recommend all medical waste produced during the care of COVID 19 patients be collected safely in designated containers and bags, to be later safely disposed of or treated, preferably onsite. It also recommends that people handling healthcare waste wear appropriate personal protective equipment such as a long-sleeved gown, thick gloves, a mask, goggles and an apron.Topics : There is no data on how much medical waste is being produced as a result of COVID-19, but the Environment and Forestry Ministry predicted that medical waste would increase during the pandemic, particularly from the use of protective gear and other single-use medical equipment. Not to mention the medical waste from the 132 referral hospitals for COVID-19 patients and the increasing public use of face masks and gloves.“This pandemic is still developing,” the ministry’s waste management director general Rosa Vivien Ratnawati said.Read also: Bappenas, UI modeling shows grim projection of COVID-19 spread in IndonesiaIn response, the ministry issued on March 24 a circular on infectious waste and household waste management during the pandemic, detailing mechanisms for central government and regional administrations to prevent COVID-19 waste buildup.last_img read more

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Coronavirus pause could force global football to change

first_imgFootball has ground to a halt due to the coronavirus pandemic, and the immediate concern is the simple survival of many clubs because of the financial impact, but there is hope that the global game could ultimately emerge better from this crisis.”We are living through something none of us were used to and which will change us profoundly,” Everton manager Carlo Ancelotti told Corriere dello Sport.Not since World War II has the sport been forced to stop across Europe. The sudden interruption has exposed the deficiencies of a system intoxicated by huge sums of money. Topics : Fairer distribution of money? “It could actually get worse. For there to be real change there has to be a change in the way power and ownership is distributed in the game.”At the moment the financial power belongs to the lucky few at the top, but even they are being hurt. That is likely to affect the transfer market, and huge spending sprees on players could become a thing of the past.”In two or three years, it will not be possible to spend the sums we have been seeing because every country will be affected. In all likelihood a new footballing world will emerge from this,” insisted former Bayern Munich president Uli Hoeness.Already players at Barcelona — the richest club in the world — have agreed a 70 percent pay cut. Clubs across Europe are taking similar measures.It is evidence that clubs, even in the elite, have been living on the edge, and it raises the question of whether salary caps could finally be seen as a way forward, despite the difficulties presented by EU rules.In Germany, the Bundesliga’s four Champions League representatives this season have pledged 20 million euros ($22 million) to help crisis-hit clubs in an encouraging sign of solidarity.Meanwhile, lessons may also be learned about how TV revenue is distributed in future. Cutbacks are inevitable in the short term. “TV money will go down, players and coaches will earn less. Tickets will cost less because people will have less money. The economy will be different and so will football. Maybe it will be better,” said Ancelotti.”As with most things, crisis is an opportunity,” football historian and academic David Goldblatt, author of recent book The Age of Football, told AFP, before sounding a warning. Fewer games It may also be time to rework the fixture calendar. The fashion for expanding existing tournaments — like staging a 48-team World Cup and 24-team Club World Cup — is surely not sustainable.”It is now high time that we find some rules to say ok, let’s get out of this crisis as well as we can, but let’s also put safeguards in that manage player loads successfully moving forward,” warned Jonas Baer-Hoffmann, general secretary of global players’ union FIFPro, as he called for “a much healthier set-up than we what have had lately.”FIFA president Gianni Infantino has acknowledged the calls for change, telling La Gazzetta dello Sport that “we can perhaps reform world football by taking a step back. With different formats. Fewer tournaments, maybe fewer teams, but more balanced.”Goldblatt, meanwhile, believes FIFA need to look again at plans to stage a 48-team World Cup in 2026 all across North America.That, and the European Championship that UEFA intend to stage in 12 cities across the continent, are being planned in ways which appear at odds with the need to face up to another imminent threat: climate change.”If we have learned anything from the last couple of months it is that we should listen to the scientists,” Goldblatt says. “We need to hit the pause button on all of this and have a massive rethink.”last_img read more

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Zoom agrees to step up security after New York probe

first_imgNew York state’s top prosecutor on Thursday announced that the company Zoom would improve security measures, after flaws were detected as the video conferencing platform soared in popularity amid the coronavirus pandemic.The agreement wraps an investigation launched in March by New York Attorney General Letitia James into vulnerabilities in the California-based company’s software.In a statement, James said Zoom would institute new security measures for the millions of users using the platform, including enhanced privacy controls. Topics : The company also agreed to conduct regular risk assessment and software code reviews to detect vulnerabilities.The number of daily video meetings on Zoom skyrocketed from 10 million in January to more than 300 million at the end of April.But a “Zoom-bombing” phenomenon sparked warnings about lax security, as virtual intruders interrupted religious ceremonies, remote classes and other Zoom gatherings. In some cases, pornographic images popped up.center_img James said Zoom would take steps to prevent those breaches as well as end its user data-sharing partnership with Facebook.The platform is to improve privacy controls for free accounts — users avoid a monthly fee for meetings 40 minutes and under — along with education accounts for K-12 students.All hosts will now be able to control access to conferences with a required password for those attempting to access a meeting.”Our lives have inexorably changed over the past two months, and while Zoom has provided an invaluable service, it unacceptably did so without critical security protections,” James said in the statement. “This agreement puts protections in place so that Zoom users have control over their privacy and security.”last_img read more

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