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The Electoral College is close. The popular vote isn’t.

first_imgThis means more Americans have voted for a Democrat for president than for a Republican in each of the past four elections, and seven of the past eight, the exception being 2004, when President George W. Bush beat John Kerry by about three million votes. But, depending on the outcome this year, only four or five times in those eight elections have they actually put one in the White House.It looks likely that Mr. Biden will eke out an Electoral College win. But the narrowness of the result, in contrast to the fairly decisive preference of the American public, has intensified some Americans’ anger at a system in which a minority of people can often claim a majority of power. Mr. Biden’s current vote margin is, in fact, larger than the populations of more than 20 states, and more than the population of Los Angeles.A similar disparity exists in the Senate, where the current Democratic minority was elected with more votes than the Republican majority and where by 2040, based on population projections, about 70 percent of Americans will be represented by 30 percent of senators.“It’s not that the states that are represented by the 30 percent are all red, but what we do know is that the states that are going to have 70 senators are in no way representative of the diversity in the country,” said Norman Ornstein, a resident scholar at the American Enterprise Institute. “The more this happens, the more you get the sense that voters don’t have a say in the choice of their leaders. And you cannot have a democracy over a period of time that survives if a majority of people believe that their franchise is meaningless.” “We look at a map of so-called red and blue states and treat that map as land and not people,” said Carol Anderson, a professor of African-American studies at Emory University who researches voter suppression. “I’ve been thinking about how hard folks have to work to be able to vote, what it takes to overcome all of this that voter suppression has put in place, and that someone could be ahead by three million votes — which is bigger than most cities and probably some states — and still we have what almost amounts to a nail-biter.”- Advertisement – As the presidential race inches agonizingly toward a conclusion, it might be easy to miss the fact that the results are not actually very close.With many ballots still outstanding in heavily Democratic cities, former Vice President Joseph R. Biden Jr. was leading President Trump by more than 4 million votes nationwide as of Thursday evening. His lead will continue to expand, perhaps substantially, as officials finish counting.- Advertisement –center_img – Advertisement – – Advertisement –last_img read more

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Biden puts health care front and center with a call to expand Obamacare

first_img– Advertisement – WILMINGTON, DELAWARE – NOVEMBER 09: U.S. President-elect Joe Biden speaks to the media after receiving a briefing from the transition COVID-19 advisory board on November 09, 2020 at the Queen Theater in Wilmington, Delaware. Mr. Biden spoke about how his administration would respond to the coronavirus pandemic. (Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images)Joe Raedle | Getty Images News | Getty Images “Each and every vote for Joe Biden was a statement that healthcare in America should be a right and not a privilege. Each and every vote for Joe  Biden was a vote to protect and expand the Affordable Care Act, not to tear it away in the midst of a global pandemic.”Biden’s remarks were timed to pivot off oral arguments Tuesday before the Supreme Court in a major case over the constitutionality of the landmark 2010 healthcare law. But they also reflect the preeminent position that health and healthcare issues occupy within the incoming Biden administration’s broader policy agenda.- Advertisement – WASHINGTON — President-elect Joe Biden on Tuesday laid out his case for expanding the Affordable Care Act, saying the coronavirus pandemic has laid bare the urgent need to give more Americans access to health insurance. “Beginning on Jan. 20, Vice President-elect Harris and I will do everything we can to ease the burden of health care on you and your family,” Biden said in a speech in Wilmington, Delaware.Introducing Biden on stage, Harris said Biden’s election victory over President Donald Trump amounted to a mandate for expanding access to health care and health insurance.- Advertisement –center_img Biden was declared the winner of the 2020 presidential election on Saturday, after he secured the 270 electoral college votes needed to defeat President Donald Trump. “My transition team will be starting its work to flush out the details so we can hit the ground running, tackling costs, increasing access, lowering the price of prescription drugs. Families are reeling right now… They need a lifeline and  they need it now,” said Biden.On Monday, his first full workday as president-elect, Biden met with his newly assembled coronavirus task force and spoke afterwards about the need for a nationwide campaign to encourage mask-wearing. Biden’s decision to use his second workday as president-elect to speak again about health and healthcare was noteworthy. “This doesn’t need to be a partisan issue. It’s a human issue,” he said of expanding health insurance.Expanding the ACA to include a government-administered health insurance option was a core promise of Biden’s presidential campaign.But Biden aides and advisers also knew that it was one of the pledges that relied most heavily on Democrats winning majorities in the House and Senate. With Republicans currently expected to hold onto their majority in the Senate, any “public option” expansion of the ACA is likely to exist more as a negotiating platform than a legislative reality.Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell has repeatedly called Obamacare “the single worst piece of legislation to pass in the last 50 years.” – Advertisement –last_img read more

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KitchenAid Digital Countertop Oven features 9 preset cooking functions » Gadget Flow

first_img– Advertisement – The KitchenAid Digital Countertop Oven is great for beginners and experienced cooks looking for a helping hand at mealtimes. This kitchen gadget features nine preset cooking functions to make meal preparation easier. It features bake, broil, toast, warm, reheat, bagel, pizza, cookies, roast, and frozen options. In fact, these cooking functions allow you to prepare a variety of foods in the KitchenAid Digital Countertop Oven. Furthermore, it comes with an easy-to-read digital display. Therefore, you can conveniently check the remaining cooking time, choose a setting, and more. KitchenAid designed this oven with a non-stick interior for quick and easy cleaning every time. Finally, its sleek design, streamlined profile, and black chrome knobs allow you to keep it on display in your kitchen ready for immediate use.last_img read more

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Scary Is How You Act, Not Look, Disability Advocates Tell Filmmakers

first_img– Advertisement – Disability rights advocates said the whole matter could have been avoided if more disabled people were in the entertainment industry, be it in front of the camera or behind the scenes. “If there were writers, directors or other crew members with disabilities, they, might have seen it and said ‘Huh, maybe this is an issue,’” said Lauren Appelbaum, vice president of communications for RespectAbility, a nonprofit organization fighting the stigmatization of people with disabilities.There is more leeway, and less potential to offend, when villains are clearly fantastical creatures, unreal figments of imagination, like the Shadow Monster in “Stranger Things.”Still, the question for many remains why clearly human or human-esque villains need to have visual signifiers connoting evil at all. Many of the scariest horror film characters have been able-bodied. Like Samara, the unstoppable long-tressed dead girl in “The Ring,” or Jack Nicholson’s possessed writer in “The Shining.” Or — shudder — Javier Bardem in “No Country for Old Men,” with his creepy, pasty pallor and Dorothy Hamill bob. But even such depictions tread a fine line, threatening to lapse into the timeworn indictment of mental illness, à la Norman Bates in “Psycho.”“Monstrosity is something in all of us,” Smith said, “not something out there in a bodily form different than our own.” The Joker. Lord Voldemort. All manner of scarred Bond villains and superhero antagonists. Dr. Poison. Freddy Krueger. The Phantom of the Opera. Shakespeare’s hunchbacked, butcherous Richard the Third. One in four adults in the United States have a physical or mental impairment that sharply limits activities; a recent study found that less than 2 percent of characters with speaking parts in top movies from 2018 were disabled. While advocacy groups are working with studios to change that, critics say disabled characters still fall too often into predictable buckets, among them the villain or the victim that provides uplift for all, which some have nicknamed “inspiration porn.”“Disabled people either play villains or happy snowflake angel babies,” said Maysoon Zayid, a comedian, writer and actor who has cerebral palsy. “We’re either charitable, inspirational, never do naughty things in our life. Or we’re murdering babies because we lost an eye in a dart accident.” Advocates are conscious of the criticism that the world has become too hypervigilant, and that the blowback against “The Witches” is another example of political correctness hammering away at artistic expression. Certainly what’s deemed acceptable has changed over time. There was scant criticism of Anjelica Huston’s ghoulish Grand High Witch in the 1990 film version, or for the 1980s character of Sloth, the monster in “The Goonies” (though, spoiler alert, he ended up being a good guy).Yet even as stereotypical portrayals of other marginalized groups are increasingly recognized as problematic, the disfigured villain has proved harder to rout. In the forthcoming Bond film “No Time to Die,” Rami Malek and Christoph Waltz both play criminals who have facial disfigurements.“Obviously, we don’t want a culture where everyone’s outraged about everything,” said Ashley Eakin, a writer and director who has Ollier disease and Maffucci syndrome, which affects the growth and formation of bones. “For so long, disability has been underrepresented, so if we only see disfigurement in a villain or character with no redeeming qualities, that’s an issue.” – Advertisement – People with limb differences, including paralympians and a “Great British Baking Show” semifinalist, posted photos of their hands and arms on social media with the hashtag #NotAWitch. While Hathaway and Warner Bros. apologized, many saw the damage as already done. Here, yet again, was a villain with a disability, one of the oldest, and, for many, most damaging, storytelling tropes still around.“This isn’t about being overly sensitive, a ‘snowflake’ or being too politically correct,” Briony May Williams, the British baking competitor, wrote on Instagram. “This is about showcasing limb differences as ugly, scary, gross and evil.”center_img For as long as there have been stages and screens, disability and disfigurement have been used as visual shorthand for evildoing — a nod to the audience that a character was a baddie to be feared. But disability rights advocates say this amounts not just to lazy storytelling but stereotyping, further marginalizing an already stigmatized community that is rarely represented onscreen. That “The Witches” is a family film, they say, made it worse.“Playgrounds are where kids are sometimes the cruelest, and kids absorb what they learn, be it through stories we tell or what they learn from their parents,” said Penny Loker, a Canadian visible difference advocate and writer. “They have carte balance to be cruel to people. I was called a monster, and I was called whatever the name of the monster was from the movie that was popular at that time.”People with disabilities have had some success in challenging the stereotype. In 2018, spurred by a campaign for accurate portrayals of disabilities, the British Film Institute announced it would no longer fund films whose villains have scarred or disfigured faces. Warner Bros. has pleaded ignorance, saying it worked with the film’s artists to create a fresh interpretation of what Dahl described as “thin curvy claws, like a cat,” never intending for viewers to feel represented by the “fantastical, nonhuman creatures” onscreen. Hathaway, in her apology, said she had not associated her character’s hands with limb differences, and if she had, the depiction wouldn’t have happened at all. In Zayid’s view, there are limited circumstances under which it’s OK for a villain to be disabled or disfigured. One is when a disabled actor is playing the character, she said, so long as the disfigurement is not what makes them evil. The other is when the evil person being portrayed is a person who has a disability in real life, and even then, Zayid maintains, only a disabled actor should be cast.Using disability or disfigurement as shorthand for evil goes back centuries in Western culture, said Angela Smith, director of disability studies at the University of Utah. In both lore and real life, physical differences have been read as warnings of danger, symbols of evil, or evidence of sinning or witchcraft. The eugenics movement tapped into this, measuring deviations from assumed norms, Smith said, and the presupposition that disability is something negative in need of fixing continues to inform modern medicine.It’s also a long standing trope in fairy tales and fantasy and horror stories. Monsters are given characteristics — the way they talk, behave, look or move — that are meant to seem threatening or grotesque, Smith noted. This carries onscreen, where physical differences are often revealed dramatically as visual shorthand for evilness or immorality: think of Freddy Krueger’s brutally burned face in the “Nightmare on Elm Street” films. All of which, Smith said, subtly shapes perceptions about an already marginalized community, whether “The Witches” intended to or not.“Popular films like this send very clear messages: that disabled bodies are wrong or evil, that they don’t belong in ‘normal’ society or public view, that it is ‘natural’ to be disgusted by difference,” Smith wrote in an email. – Advertisement – When “The Witches,” starring Anne Hathaway as the Grand High Witch, was released last month, a collective groan went up from people with disabilities.The movie, based on a Roald Dahl children’s book, depicted Hathaway with hands that were wizened and disfigured, with two fingers and a thumb on each. The studio said her hands were meant to resemble cat claws, but they looked a whole lot like split hands, or ectrodactyly.- Advertisement –last_img read more

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CDC expects 100 million doses of flu vaccine this season

first_imgSep 6, 2006 (CIDRAP News) – Influenza vaccine manufacturers expect to make and distribute more than 100 million doses in the next few months, millions more than in any previous flu season, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) said today.The predicted total is about 17 million more than the current record for doses distributed—83.1 million in 2003, the CDC said. Last year about 81.2 million doses were distributed.Although the flow of vaccine is always hard to predict, CDC Director Dr. Julie Gerberding said in a news release, “If the manufacturers’ estimates hold, more people than ever before will be able to protect themselves and their loved ones from influenza this year.”Manufacturers expect that about 75 million doses will be distributed by the end of October, followed by most of the rest in November, the CDC said. Remaining doses should reach clinics by early January. Last year about 60 million doses were distributed by the end of October, officials said.Producers and major distributors intend to “provide some influenza vaccine by the end of October to all providers who ordered it,” the statement said.”We expect that some healthcare providers and clinics may get or have more influenza vaccine than others in the first month or so, but people will have plenty of opportunities to be vaccinated during October and November, as well as December or later,” Dr. Lance Rodewald, director of the CDC’s Immunization Services Division, said in the news release.CDC officials told CIDRAP News the US vaccine supply could reach as high as 115 million doses this season if a vaccine made by the Canadian firm ID Biomedical, now part of GlaxoSmithKline, wins Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval soon.”We’re hoping it’ll be licensed in September, but we don’t know,” said Rodewald.Curtis Allen, spokesman for the CDC’s National Immunization Program, said ID Biomedical might contribute 10 million to 15 million doses to the US supply if the vaccine is licensed. Some of those doses wouldn’t be available until after December, he said.Last week Bloomberg News reported that a slow-growing strain of virus used in this year’s vaccine could delay delivery of some of the doses destined for Americans by up to 3 weeks. The report said the three biggest suppliers to the US market—Novartis, GlaxoSmithKline, and Sanofi Pasteur—have had trouble growing the influenza A(H3N2) strain in this year’s vaccine.But Rodewald told CIDRAP News he does not expect that problem to affect the US supply this season.”I think some of the European manufacturers were using a different strain, but all the vaccine made for the American market used a strain that was not the slow grower, so we haven’t seen problems with the slow-growing strain here in the US,” he said.The CDC recommends getting flu shots in October or November, before the flu season usually begins, but says vaccination is still worthwhile in December or later, because the season typically doesn’t peak until February.This year the agency recommended for the first time that 2-, 3-, and 4-year-olds and their household contacts and caregivers receive flu shots. The recommendation added an estimated 16 million people to the population for whom the shots are advised. Children between 6 and 23 months and their close contacts were included in the flu immunization recommendations 2 years ago.Other groups advised to get flu shots, according to the CDC, include:Children and adolescents (6 months through 18 years) on long-term aspirin therapyWomen who will be pregnant during the flu seasonAdults and children who have asthma, other chronic respiratory or cardiovascular conditions, or any condition that can impair respiratory functionAdults and children under treatment for chronic metabolic disorders, kidney problems, hemoglobinopathies, or immunodeficiencyResidents of nursing homes and other chronic-care facilitiesPeople age 50 and olderHealthcare workersClose contacts of people at high risk for severe flu complications.See also:Sep 6 CDC news release on projected flu vaccine supplyhttp://www.cdc.gov/media/pressrel/r060906b.htmJun 29 CIDRAP News story “CDC recommends flu shots for more toddlers”http://www.cidrap.umn.edu/cidrap/content/influenza/general/news/jun2906fluvaccine.htmllast_img read more

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1918 flu virus: tiny changes cancel transmissibility

first_img Though the experiment was designed to explore pandemic strain evolution—and further work could lead to identifying genetic changes that might be early-warning signals of dangerous strains—Tumpey cautioned against applying the results too directly to H5N1 avian flu. The process overwrote the virus’s preference for where in the respiratory tract it locks on to reproduce, a process that keenly interests flu virologists. The changes they made at two spots in that virus’s hemagglutinin—a surface protein that allows it to bind to cells so it can reproduce—did not affect the virus’s ability to replicate or cause disease in laboratory ferrets, but they prevented the disease passing from one ferret to others caged nearby. “It may turn out that the combination of changes needed is unlikely to occur in nature. Maybe H5N1 doesn’t have the capacity to make the switch, or if it does it may end up as a virus that doesn’t bind or is attenuated,” he said. “I personally don’t think only two changes will be necessary; I think it will take more than that.” Feb 2, 2007 (CIDRAP News) – Inducing just two small changes in the virus that caused the influenza pandemic of 1918 inhibits the pathogen’s ability to spread, researchers reported Thursday, a finding that may help identify potential pandemic flu strains in the future. “The question we have been asking for years now is: What do influenza viruses with pandemic potential need to create efficient and sustained transmission in the human population,” Tumpey said in an interview. “We think these studies will provide a better framework for understanding viruses’ pandemic potential.” Human-adapted viruses, including the original 1918 virus—an H1N1 strain that was reassembled from victims’ tissues—bind to a receptor known as alpha-2,6 SA (for sialic acid). Avian viruses bind to one known as alpha-2,3 SA. Changing a single amino acid in the 1918 virus’s hemagglutinin caused it to bind to both receptors in ferrets’ lung tissue; changing two amino acids caused it to switch its binding preference completely. That strain, which has spread across the globe in birds and sickened at least 270 humans, killing 164, has not yet acquired the ability to spread efficiently from person to person. But pressing ahead with the research—which has provoked controversy both for the original viral rescue and for being carried out under moderate biosecurity rather than the highest level—will reduce the uncertainty, according to CDC Director Julie Gerberding. Though all the virus variants caused severe disease in ferrets inoculated with them, only the original virus spread easily to ferrets caged alongside the infected animals. The virus with the single genetic change apparently did infect the neighboring ferrets, but in such low amounts that it did not cause disease. The virus with two changes did not infect neighboring ferrets at all, taking the researchers by surprise. The dramatic effect of such a simple change in the virus illustrates the difficulty of predicting pandemic strains’ emergence, said Michael Osterholm, director of the University of Minnesota Center for Infectious Disease Research and Policy, publisher of the CIDRAP Web site. “I thought there would still be some transmission, because this is a virus that replicates so well,” Tumpey said. “I didn’t think transmission would be completely abolished.” The necessary mutations “could be very complicated and could never happen, or they could be just one or two mutations that could happen at any time,” he said. “The trillion-dollar question is, Which one of those assumptions is closer to the truth?” Writing in the Feb 2 issue of Science, Terrence Tumpey of the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and co-authors describe switching out two amino acids in the reconstructed 1918 virus that the team rescued in 2005. The 1918 virus was an avian strain that adapted to humans over a still-unknown period of exposure. The changes made by the research team effectively forced that process a few steps backward, by taking the virus back to a form more adapted to birds. “With this vital research, we are learning more about what may have contributed to the spread and deadliness of the 1918 pandemic,” Gerberding said in a statement. “By better understanding how this virus spreads, we can be better positioned to slow down or stop the spread of the pandemic virus and hence be better prepared for the next pandemic.” Tumpey TM, Maines TR, Van Hoeven N, et al. A two-amino acid change in the hemagglutinin of the 1918 influenza virus abolishes transmission. Science 2007 Feb 2;315(5812):655-9 [Abstract]last_img read more

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GAO: Obama should address health preparedness, food safety

first_img In the interest of pandemic preparedness, DHS should make fuller use of the coordinating councils that were set up to facilitate joint public-private planning for critical infrastructure protection. In addition, the GAO said, the allocation of funds among agencies is skewed: the US Department of Agriculture regulates about 20% of the food supply but gets most of the money for food safety inspections, while the Food and Drug Administration oversees about 80% of the food supply with only 24% of the money. See also: The Homeland Security (DHS) and Health and Human Services (HHS) departments should conduct joint testing and training exercises for pandemic flu to ensure that leadership roles are clearly defined and that leaders can effectively carry out shared responsibilities. Preparedness recommendationsThe GAO makes nine recommendations for improving public health preparedness, all of them drawn from previous GAO reports. Five of these explicitly relate to the threat of a flu pandemic: Congress should pass “comprehensive, uniform, and risk-based food safety legislation.” The Homeland Security Council should set up a process and schedule for updating the national pandemic implementation plan in a way that includes nonfederal stakeholders. Congress should assign the National Academy of Sciences or an expert panel to analyze alternative food safety organizational structures. HHS and DHS should hold more meetings of the states in the five pandemic planning regions to help them address gaps in their planning. “Congress and the executive branch should create the environment needed to look across the activities of individual programs and toward the goals the federal government is trying to achieve,” the statement says. Specifically, the agency says: The GAO said the 13 urgent issues are the centerpiece of a new Web site it launched yesterday in an effort to help smooth the transition to the new administration and Congress. The site includes statements on each of the 13 issues. “GAO has combed through all of our recent work to help identify where our work can help address urgent challenges facing the nation now, to assist new appointees in every agency [to] zero in on the challenges of that particular agency, and to help identify areas with the potential to save the nation billions of dollars.” In addition, the statement says HHS should serve as a clearinghouse to enable states to share information on altered standards of care, for the sake of helping states determine how they will allocate scarce medical resources in a mass-casualty event. The president should reconvene the President’s Council on Food Safety or create another forum in the short term. For the long term, the president should consider other structures to promote interagency coordination on food safety. Nov 7, 2008 (CIDRAP News) – The Government Accountability Office (GAO) has listed public health emergency preparedness and food safety as two of 13 “urgent issues” that will need attention from President-elect Barack Obama and the new Congress next year. The executive branch should develop a “governmentwide performance plan” that provides a cross-agency perspective to help ensure agencies’ goals are complementary and help leaders balance trade-offs in allocating resources. Listing the 13 issues in a press release, Comptroller General Gene Dodaro said, “With the serious challenges related to financial markets and the economy, the financial crisis facing the nation, two wars under way, and the first transition since 9/11 and the creation of a Department of Homeland Security, this is absolutely a unique time. Nov 7 GAO news releasehttp://www.gao.gov/press/press-transition-release2008nov06.pdf In statements released online yesterday, the GAO, Congress’s investigative agency, calls on the government to take several specific steps to strengthen public health preparedness, especially for pandemic influenza, and to improve coordination of food safety efforts. HHS should “expeditiously” complete its guidance to help state and local public health agencies decide how to use limited supplies of antivirals and pandemic vaccines. Sorting out food safety effortsIn its statement on food safety, the GAO reiterates points it has made a number of times about the fragmented federal regulatory system, with 15 different agencies involved in administering food safety laws. This leads to inconsistent oversight and ineffective coordination, undermines strategic planning for food production inspections, and hinders responses to foodborne disease outbreaks, the agency said.last_img read more

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H1N1 FLU BREAKING NEWS: Legal issues, surge in China, cheek kissing, nurses want N-95s, vaccine delay

first_imgSep 8, 2009Report says job questions among top pandemic-related legal issuesQuestions related to employment are among the most significant legal issues raised by an influenza pandemic, the Congressional Research Service (CRS) said in a recent report on pandemic-related legal issues. Compliance with public health measures such as isolation and quarantine are likely to suffer if workers fear pay cuts or firing, the report says. It says workers may have some protection under the Family and Medical Leave Act.http://opencrs.com/document/R40560/2009-08-11/?23824Full text of CRS reportChina reports flu rise, predicts vaccine shortageChina’s health minister Chen Zhu today called the country’s pandemic flu situation “grim,” due to a surge in cases and clusters in the wake of schools resuming, Agence France-Presse (AFP) reported. Chen cited worries over a national holiday next month, which will prompt gatherings and travel, and the limited ability of China’s flu vaccine company to supply enough pandemic H1N1 vaccine to meet demand. China has confirmed 5,592 cases, but has reported no deaths.http://www.asiaone.com/News/Latest%2BNews/Health/Story/A1Story20090908-166459.htmlSep 8 AFP storyPandemic puts damper on French cheek kissTo help curb the spread of the pandemic H1N1 virus, French health officials, as well as some companies and schools, are advising people to avoid greeting other with “la bise,” the country’s traditional cheek-to-cheek kiss, the Associated Press (AP) reported yesterday. The health ministry’s phone hotline recommends avoiding close contact, such as shaking hands or kissing.http://www.foxnews.com/story/0,2933,547383,00.htmlSep 7 AP storySingapore finds pandemic H1N1 virus in Indonesian pigsSingapore’s Agri-Food and Veterinary Authority has detected the pandemic H1N1 virus in pigs imported from Indonesia, according to a recent report by Channel NewsAsia. While saying that pork sold in Singapore is safe to eat, the agency vowed to step up its inspections of pork products and to work with Indonesian authorities to identify and isolate affected pig houses on farms.New York nurses group advocates N95 respiratorsIn an open letter, the New York State Nurses Association (NYSNA) called on the state health department to recommend the use of fit-tested N95 respirators to protect nurses who care for pandemic H1N1 flu patients. The Sep 4 letter said the state’s current guidelines, which call for the use of surgical masks, are not adequate. A health department spokeswoman defended the current guidelines and said nurses would be protected by mandatory vaccinations, the New York Daily News reported.Production delay slows vaccine delivery to HollandThe Dutch health ministry said today a delivery of 18 million doses of pandemic H1N1 vaccine from Novartis slated for the end of October will be late, Dow Jones news reported today. Novartis attributed the delay to “disappointing production result.” The country, now expecting 6 to 10 million doses from the company by the end of next month, expects 2 million more from GlaxoSmithKline. Novartis said it hopes to boost yield by using a new seed strain it received from the World Health Organization.Flu fatal for Ecuador’s security chiefEcuador’s presidential security chief, John Merino, died on Sep 6 from a pandemic H1N1 infection, AFP reported today. He was first diagnosed with the novel flu strain on Aug 10. The virus has struck a host of other South American government officials over the past few weeks, including the presidents of Costa Rica and Colombia.last_img read more

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For the dry stone wall and the fortress of Sv. Nikola awarded 4,9 million kuna in grants

first_imgA new 4,9 million grant is arriving in Šibenik-Knin County, one part of the funds for the project of protection of drywall traditional construction, and the other for the revitalization of the fortress of Sv. NicholasDeputy Prefect of Šibenik-Knin County Nikola Blažević in the Government of the Republic of Croatia signed a grant agreement for the project “Hereditas – project for the protection of drywall traditional construction” with the Minister of Regional Development and EU Funds Gabriel Žalac and Director of the Central Agency for Financing and Contracting Programs and Projects Of the European Union by Tomislav Petrić.For the project “Hereditas – project for the protection of drywall traditional construction” Šibenik-Knin County was awarded 2.306.181,04 kuna which will be spent for the protection and presentation of our indigenous architecture. The protection of drywall traditional construction will be carried out through two components: the reconstruction of Bunja “Rašinov stan” in Okit near Vodice as a unique building in the history of architecture, and the construction of a visitor center whose architecture as a circular building with stone walls would resemble the restored bunja and revive bunja heritage. .Also, the director of the Public Institution Nature of Šibenik-Knin County Anita Babačić Ajduk signed a contract for the project “Tourist valorization of the fortress of Sv. Nikola in the channel Sv. Ante ”which allocated HRK 2,6 million for the needs of financing the project proposal whose project partners are Šibenik-Knin County and the Public Institution Development Agency of Šibenik-Knin County. The allocated funds will be spent on the preparation of project documentation necessary for the reconstruction and rehabilitation of the Fortress, interior design and access infrastructure to the Fortress. In order to put the fortress in the function of visiting, a detailed Management Plan will be made.The funds were allocated within the Operational Program “Competitiveness and Cohesion 2014-2020” announced by the Ministry of Regional Development and European Union Funds and to which the Šibenik-Knin County and the Public Institution Priroda ŠKŽ applied in 2015.last_img read more

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