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Roger Allbee appointed to Union Institute Board of Trustees

first_imgUnion Institute & University (UI&U), a private, non-profit university based in Montpelier, has announced the appointment of Roger Allbee to its Board of Trustees. Allbee is a leader in the advancement of agriculture in the United States and former secretary of the Vermont Agency of Agriculture, Food, and Markets. ‘Roger Allbee’s knowledge, experience, expertise, and lifelong commitment to Vermont will help Union make a lasting, positive impact on higher education initiatives in Vermont and beyond,’ said Roger H. Sublett, president of Union Institute & University. ‘We are honored that he has chosen to serve on Union’s Board of Trustees.’ Allbee was appointed secretary of the Vermont Agency of Agriculture, Food, and Markets in January 2007 by former Vermont Governor Jim Douglas. As secretary, Allbee administered one of the most diverse and publically watched agencies in Vermont, overseeing all facets of the state’s agriculture including animal health and welfare, agricultural development, water quality and nutrient management, international trade and trade policy, and food safety.  Before serving as secretary, Allbee was the executive director for the United States Department of Agriculture’s (USDA) Farm Services Agency for the State of Vermont. In this role, he was responsible for the execution of farm loan and farm program delivery to Vermont farmers and managed several offices throughout the state of Vermont. During his tenure as executive director, the Vermont FSA loan team received an USDA FSA Administrator’s Award. In addition to Allbee’s roles with the state of Vermont and the USDA, he also served as a senior international business consultant on agricultural trade policy and as a professional staff member of the U.S. House Committee on Agriculture. He has also served as vice president of the former Farm Credit Banks of Springfield, Mass., and as an extension specialist at Cornell University.Allbee’s earned his B.S. in agricultural economics from the University of Vermont, and a master’s in agricultural economics from the University of Massachusetts. He has completed the Cornell University Agricultural Executives Program, and the Harvard Business School Agribusiness seminars. He served in Special Weapons of the U.S. Army with a rank of captain, and has received numerous awards including the Honor Award from the Soil and Water Conservation Society of America.Union Institute & University is a private, accredited university that has, since 1964, redefined higher education by placing learners at the center of their own education. Union serves more than 2000, self-motivated, socially conscious adults in rigorous faculty- mentored programs without interrupting professional, family, and community commitments. UI&U offers individualized programs of study leading to the baccalaureate, master’s, and doctoral degrees. In addition to its distance learning programs, academic centers are located in Cincinnati (OH), Los Angeles and Sacramento (CA), Miami (FL), and in Montpelier and Brattleboro (VT).www.myunion.edu(link is external) / Union Institute & University/ 62 Ridge St., Suite 2/ Montpelierlast_img read more

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Scary Is How You Act, Not Look, Disability Advocates Tell Filmmakers

first_img– Advertisement – Disability rights advocates said the whole matter could have been avoided if more disabled people were in the entertainment industry, be it in front of the camera or behind the scenes. “If there were writers, directors or other crew members with disabilities, they, might have seen it and said ‘Huh, maybe this is an issue,’” said Lauren Appelbaum, vice president of communications for RespectAbility, a nonprofit organization fighting the stigmatization of people with disabilities.There is more leeway, and less potential to offend, when villains are clearly fantastical creatures, unreal figments of imagination, like the Shadow Monster in “Stranger Things.”Still, the question for many remains why clearly human or human-esque villains need to have visual signifiers connoting evil at all. Many of the scariest horror film characters have been able-bodied. Like Samara, the unstoppable long-tressed dead girl in “The Ring,” or Jack Nicholson’s possessed writer in “The Shining.” Or — shudder — Javier Bardem in “No Country for Old Men,” with his creepy, pasty pallor and Dorothy Hamill bob. But even such depictions tread a fine line, threatening to lapse into the timeworn indictment of mental illness, à la Norman Bates in “Psycho.”“Monstrosity is something in all of us,” Smith said, “not something out there in a bodily form different than our own.” The Joker. Lord Voldemort. All manner of scarred Bond villains and superhero antagonists. Dr. Poison. Freddy Krueger. The Phantom of the Opera. Shakespeare’s hunchbacked, butcherous Richard the Third. One in four adults in the United States have a physical or mental impairment that sharply limits activities; a recent study found that less than 2 percent of characters with speaking parts in top movies from 2018 were disabled. While advocacy groups are working with studios to change that, critics say disabled characters still fall too often into predictable buckets, among them the villain or the victim that provides uplift for all, which some have nicknamed “inspiration porn.”“Disabled people either play villains or happy snowflake angel babies,” said Maysoon Zayid, a comedian, writer and actor who has cerebral palsy. “We’re either charitable, inspirational, never do naughty things in our life. Or we’re murdering babies because we lost an eye in a dart accident.” Advocates are conscious of the criticism that the world has become too hypervigilant, and that the blowback against “The Witches” is another example of political correctness hammering away at artistic expression. Certainly what’s deemed acceptable has changed over time. There was scant criticism of Anjelica Huston’s ghoulish Grand High Witch in the 1990 film version, or for the 1980s character of Sloth, the monster in “The Goonies” (though, spoiler alert, he ended up being a good guy).Yet even as stereotypical portrayals of other marginalized groups are increasingly recognized as problematic, the disfigured villain has proved harder to rout. In the forthcoming Bond film “No Time to Die,” Rami Malek and Christoph Waltz both play criminals who have facial disfigurements.“Obviously, we don’t want a culture where everyone’s outraged about everything,” said Ashley Eakin, a writer and director who has Ollier disease and Maffucci syndrome, which affects the growth and formation of bones. “For so long, disability has been underrepresented, so if we only see disfigurement in a villain or character with no redeeming qualities, that’s an issue.” – Advertisement – People with limb differences, including paralympians and a “Great British Baking Show” semifinalist, posted photos of their hands and arms on social media with the hashtag #NotAWitch. While Hathaway and Warner Bros. apologized, many saw the damage as already done. Here, yet again, was a villain with a disability, one of the oldest, and, for many, most damaging, storytelling tropes still around.“This isn’t about being overly sensitive, a ‘snowflake’ or being too politically correct,” Briony May Williams, the British baking competitor, wrote on Instagram. “This is about showcasing limb differences as ugly, scary, gross and evil.”center_img For as long as there have been stages and screens, disability and disfigurement have been used as visual shorthand for evildoing — a nod to the audience that a character was a baddie to be feared. But disability rights advocates say this amounts not just to lazy storytelling but stereotyping, further marginalizing an already stigmatized community that is rarely represented onscreen. That “The Witches” is a family film, they say, made it worse.“Playgrounds are where kids are sometimes the cruelest, and kids absorb what they learn, be it through stories we tell or what they learn from their parents,” said Penny Loker, a Canadian visible difference advocate and writer. “They have carte balance to be cruel to people. I was called a monster, and I was called whatever the name of the monster was from the movie that was popular at that time.”People with disabilities have had some success in challenging the stereotype. In 2018, spurred by a campaign for accurate portrayals of disabilities, the British Film Institute announced it would no longer fund films whose villains have scarred or disfigured faces. Warner Bros. has pleaded ignorance, saying it worked with the film’s artists to create a fresh interpretation of what Dahl described as “thin curvy claws, like a cat,” never intending for viewers to feel represented by the “fantastical, nonhuman creatures” onscreen. Hathaway, in her apology, said she had not associated her character’s hands with limb differences, and if she had, the depiction wouldn’t have happened at all. In Zayid’s view, there are limited circumstances under which it’s OK for a villain to be disabled or disfigured. One is when a disabled actor is playing the character, she said, so long as the disfigurement is not what makes them evil. The other is when the evil person being portrayed is a person who has a disability in real life, and even then, Zayid maintains, only a disabled actor should be cast.Using disability or disfigurement as shorthand for evil goes back centuries in Western culture, said Angela Smith, director of disability studies at the University of Utah. In both lore and real life, physical differences have been read as warnings of danger, symbols of evil, or evidence of sinning or witchcraft. The eugenics movement tapped into this, measuring deviations from assumed norms, Smith said, and the presupposition that disability is something negative in need of fixing continues to inform modern medicine.It’s also a long standing trope in fairy tales and fantasy and horror stories. Monsters are given characteristics — the way they talk, behave, look or move — that are meant to seem threatening or grotesque, Smith noted. This carries onscreen, where physical differences are often revealed dramatically as visual shorthand for evilness or immorality: think of Freddy Krueger’s brutally burned face in the “Nightmare on Elm Street” films. All of which, Smith said, subtly shapes perceptions about an already marginalized community, whether “The Witches” intended to or not.“Popular films like this send very clear messages: that disabled bodies are wrong or evil, that they don’t belong in ‘normal’ society or public view, that it is ‘natural’ to be disgusted by difference,” Smith wrote in an email. – Advertisement – When “The Witches,” starring Anne Hathaway as the Grand High Witch, was released last month, a collective groan went up from people with disabilities.The movie, based on a Roald Dahl children’s book, depicted Hathaway with hands that were wizened and disfigured, with two fingers and a thumb on each. The studio said her hands were meant to resemble cat claws, but they looked a whole lot like split hands, or ectrodactyly.- Advertisement –last_img read more

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KCCA, Vipers share spoils in thrilling encounter

first_imgKCCA’s Muzamir Mutyaba tries to control the ball under pressure from Vipers’ duo of Tadeo Lwanga (left) and Moses Waiswa (right). (KCCA FC Photo)StarTimes Uganda Premier League KCCA FC 1-1 Vipers SCStarTimes Stadium, Lugogo Thursday, 04-04-2019LUGOGO – A football team fields 11 players but it takes a character to decide the end result.Uganda Premier league log leaders KCCA FC’s definition for the terminology is attacking midfielder, Sulaiman Mutyaba.The forward has found the back of the net in their last two outings guiding them to a 1-2 win over Jinja Kirinya and was on the score board as they maintained a four points lead after drawing one all with Vipers on Thursday.With the visiting side, Vipers going into the break with a 0-1 lead, KCCA FC returned with vigor and on 50th minutes, Mutyaba leveled maters.Both teams started on a high note in the first half of the game.Brian Nkuubi gave Vipers an early lead in the 29th minute assisted by Hamis Diego.KCCA had the more chances in the game but Vipers’ goal keeper Derrick Ochan denied them.Muzamiru Mutyaba would have scored a winner for KCCA but he missed two chances to score in both halves.The first scenario, his header beat the post and his second was denied by Vipers skipper in the 70th minute.Vipers packed the defence with three defenders and didn’t give KCCA a chance to score.Halid Lwaliwa got injured and was replaced Ibrahim Tembo in the 14th minuteKCCA made a double substitute at the beginning of second half by removing youngster Saddat Anaku for Patrick Kaddu and Jackson Nunda came out for Gift Ali.Speaking to the press Vipers head coach Nam Puma said Halid Lwaliwa’s injury disorganized their game plan that’s why they did not win.“Our game plan was disorganized when Halid Lwaliwa got an injury because I was sure we would get a win. Ouma said.Ouma’s counterpart, Mike Mutebi’s said the his team played well though in the final third of the pitch but the players were not patient to score the golden goal.“The players had a good game, they played well but in the final third of the pitch they were not patient to score the winner. Mutebi said.KCCA is still the table leader with 53 points while Vipers has 49points.Comments Tags: Brian NkubiKCCA FCMike MutebiMike MutyabaNam OumaStarTimes Uganda Premier Leaguetopvipers sclast_img read more