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Delta’s Liberia Passengers Will Have to Catch Flight from Accra

first_imgDelta Air Lines last week announced that it has reached agreement on what it calls “an enhanced partnership” with SkyTeam partner Kenya Airways to offer convenient connecting flights between Monrovia, Liberia, and Accra, Ghana.The services will begin effective September 1, 2014, operating three times a week on a Boeing 737 aircraft operated by Kenya Airways (KQ). The Kenya Airways flight will offer seamless and convenient connections with Delta’s nonstop flights between Accra’s Kotoka International Airport and New York’s John F. Kennedy International Airport.“Delta has had a presence in Liberia for four years and we are pleased to be able to continue this association with the country through our new partnership with Kenya Airways,” said Perry Cantarutti, Delta’s senior vice president for Europe, the Middle East and Africa. “Delta recognizes the importance of offering services between Monrovia and the United States and we would like to thank the Liberian Government for its continued support. Delta remains committed to the country and facilitating travel to the U.S. with our Kenya Airways partner.”This service replaces Delta’s three-times weekly operations from Monrovia’s Roberts International Airport to Accra, Ghana. Passengers connecting onto Delta’s Accra to New York-JFK services from Kenya Airways will enjoy through check-in for their entire journey from Monrovia – collecting their boarding passes and checking in luggage from Monrovia through to their final destination in the United States.Passengers connecting in Accra will be able to proceed directly to the transit lounge, without the need to clear Ghanaian immigration, for the flight departure from Delta’s dedicated airport gates to New York. Delta staff will be on hand to ease the connecting customer process and the transit time in Accra is anticipated to be one and a half hours. SkyMiles and Flying Blue members will continue to enjoy mileage accrual and elite benefits like extra baggage allowance, priority boarding, and lounge access on both airlines.Business class passengers connecting through Kotoka International Airport will be able to access the new Sanbra Priority Lounge, which is positioned next to Delta’s airport gates, and provides customers with a luxury lounge experience prior to their flight to New York-JFK. The lounge has capacity for 108 people with leather seating, free Wi-Fi, complimentary snacks and a wide variety of soft and alcoholic drinks, as well as televisions and shower facilities.Delta’s sales office will remain open in Liberia and continue to sell tickets to the U.S. The airline will also continue selling tickets from the U.S. to Liberia.Kenya Airways’ Regional General Manager for West Africa, America, Europe & Asia Pacific, Julius Thairu said: “This strategic partnership with Delta Air Lines enhances our presence in West Africa and cements our position as Africa’s premier airline. By providing a seamless connection from Liberia to Delta’s Accra to New York service, it significantly boosts Kenya Airways’ efforts to link Africa to the rest of the world. This will provide our guests from Africa with an additional efficient and convenient connection to the U.S. on Delta Air Lines. It ties in with our long-term growth strategy to increase our footprint across the world.”The Monrovia-Accra-New York schedule will leave Monrovia at 18:00 and arrive at 20:00 and arrive in Accra at 20:00. Thereafter, it leaves Accra at 22:35 and arrives at  05:13.Delta’s daily services between Accra and New York are operated with a Boeing 767-300 aircraft with 225 seats, comprising 25 seats in BusinessElite, 29 in Premium Economy and 171 seats in Economy.Once onboard, passengers in the BusinessElite cabin will enjoy forward-facing seats that convert to a 180-degree fully flat-bed and offer direct aisle access in a 1x2x1 configuration.  Delta has also invested in its economy class with seats that provide additional legroom, adjustable headrests, personal in-seat entertainment screens with over 350 films, 250 TV shows, 100 hours of HBO, 4,500 songs and 30 games and USB power at each seat. All Economy passengers will be provided with a complimentary amenity kit to improve their flight experience.Delta Air Lines operates services to four African cities in four countries. The airline has grown from 22 weekly departures to and from Africa in December 2006 to 29 in summer 2014.Passengers travelling from Liberia can book flights to the U.S. on Delta and Kenya Airways via travel agents and Delta’s dedicated reservations teams in Liberia.Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)last_img read more

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When concert tickets are gone in a flash, fans are left singing the blues

first_imgNEW YORK – Lisa Senauke, a Bruce Springsteen fan since 1973, tried to get tickets to his Oct. 26 concert in Oakland. The tickets were to go on sale at 10 a.m. on Sept. 17, and starting at 9:58 a.m., she logged into her Ticketmaster.com account, credit card in hand. But though she tried again and again for the next hour to buy tickets, she was always told the same thing: Nothing available. “I never even had a chance,” she said the other day. “Who, then, got those tickets? How many people managed to log in, in between me, and sweep up the tickets?” Senauke’s frustration is not isolated. The concerts of 14-year-old Miley Cyrus, the daughter of country singer Billy Ray Cyrus and star of the Disney show “Hannah Montana,” sold out in minutes. And the same thing happened with tickets to recent reunion tours by the Police and Van Halen. While some fans just quietly give up, others have complained to government officials, particularly after they found tickets to the same concerts or sporting events available – sometimes at many times the face value – on secondary sellers such as Stubhub.com and TicketsNow minutes after the public sale began. AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MOREChargers go winless in AFC West with season-ending loss in Kansas CityAfter hearing from some would-be ticket buyers, the Missouri attorney general announced Thursday that the state was suing three ticket resellers on charges that they had violated state consumer-protection laws. That same day, the Arkansas attorney general said he was seeking documents from five resellers. And the Attorney General’s Office in Pennsylvania is also looking into the reselling business after receiving several hundred complaints over a “Hannah Montana” concert in Pittsburgh, said a spokesman, Nils Frederiksen. “All hell broke loose with `Hannah Montana’,” said Justin Allen, the chief deputy attorney general in Arkansas. “The tickets were gone in 12 minutes, and when people turned around they were selling at online sites for sometimes as much as 10 times the face value.” Ticketmaster, the subsidiary of the IAC/Interactive Corp., which bills itself as the biggest seller of concert and sports tickets in the world, is also facing questions from angry fans and has sent representatives to meet with state and local officials. It argues, in part, that the number of tickets available to the public at a concert is often far less than the total number of seats in the arena. Ticketmaster has also filed a lawsuit in Federal District Court in Los Angeles against a software company based in Pittsburgh, RMG Technologies, and several ticket brokers, contending that they have discovered a way to get around Ticketmaster’s defenses. Bombarding Web site The software allows “bombarding Ticketmaster’s Web site with millions of automated ticket requests that can constitute up to 80 percent of all ticket requests made,” Ticketmaster states in its suit. These actions deny the public “access to tens of thousands of tickets so that RMG’s customers can purchase and resell those tickets to the same public at inflated prices,” it contends. A lawyer for RMG, Jay M. Coggan, denied the allegations. He said in an interview that RMG provides a specialized browser for ticket brokers but would not discuss the company’s services in detail, saying such information was proprietary. He added, “Ticketmaster isn’t losing any money – they’re getting paid full dollar for every ticket sold.” A hearing on Ticketmaster’s suit is scheduled for Oct. 15. The fact that tickets to popular events sell out so quickly – and that brokers and online resellers obtain them with such velocity – is clouding the business, many in the music industry say. It is enough, some longtime concertgoers say, to make them long for the days when all they had to do was camp out overnight. Joseph Freeman, the assistant general counsel for Ticketmaster, said that in some cases, demand for tickets simply exceeded the supply. Even in large arenas, a certain number of tickets are reserved by the artist, the promoter and the concert site, and some may also be set aside for fan clubs or presales, like those frequently held by American Express or Visa. But thousands of tickets are still typically left for the general public. In Kansas City, for example, there were “only 11,000 seats available for the `Hannah Montana’ concert,” Freeman said. “We got about 8,400. Of those, half went to the fan club while the other half was sold to the general public.” Freeman added that more tickets are often released after the initial sale date once the stage configuration is known. Automated devices While Ticketmaster would not disclose how many hits it receives when tickets go on sale, Freeman said the company had the ability to sell several thousand seats a minute. But how do hundreds of tickets show up on online sites minutes after individuals have been shut out? Officials at resellers such as Stubhub.com, now owned by eBay, guarantee the authenticity of the tickets. “What’s often mistaken about our marketplace,” Sean Pate, a spokesman for Stubhub, said in a statement, “is that we procure and price tickets when, to the contrary, we simply provide a secure and managed online marketplace for those who wish to sell tickets they possess.” The Ticketmaster suit includes a statement from a former ticket broker, Chris Kovach, who was originally named as a defendant but later settled with Ticketmaster. He said he used RMG’s “automated devices to enable me to access Ticketmaster’s Web site.” Kovach said in the statement that he had paid a monthly fee for access to RMG’s site and that its software had enabled him to simultaneously search and request tickets – sometimes more than 100 sets at a time. Kovach said in the statement that RMG’s system is “specifically designed to navigate or otherwise avoid various security measures on Ticketmaster’s Web site,” including what is known as the Captcha feature – those squiggles in a box that users must retype before they can proceed. In the meantime, potential ticket buyers continue to try various means to capture their prey. Lisa Nicholls of Houston, for example, was unsuccessful last winter in buying tickets to a “Hannah Montana” concert for her children, Alexandra, 10, and Robbie, 8. When the Toyota Center, the Houston arena, announced a new concert, her husband, Rob, sat at home with three computers logged on to the arena’s site at precisely 10 a.m., when tickets were to go on sale. Lisa Nicholls, meanwhile, had left the house hours earlier to wait at a ticket outlet at a local supermarket. Despite arriving at 7:30 a.m., she was not the first in line. Still, within minutes, she and her husband were both out of luck. “I went there thinking we would hedge our bets and do it every which way,” Lisa Nicholls said. “But only the first person in line got tickets – and I was 10th.” Jessica Fricke, a mother in Minnesota who also failed to get “Hannah Montana” tickets, tried to put the best face on it. “We are trying to teach our children the law of supply and demand. It’s a lesson for our family. It’s a hard one for an 8-year-old, but a good one.”160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set!last_img