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IEA: Renewable generation capacity expected to climb by 1,200GW in next five years

first_imgIEA: Renewable generation capacity expected to climb by 1,200GW in next five years FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享The Guardian:Global supplies of renewable electricity are growing faster than expected and could expand by 50% in the next five years, powered by a resurgence in solar energy.The International Energy Agency (IEA) found that solar, wind and hydropower projects are rolling out at their fastest rate in four years. Its latest report predicts that by 2024 a new dawn for cheap solar power could see the world’s solar capacity grow by 600GW, almost double the installed total electricity capacity of Japan. Overall, renewable electricity is expected to grow by 1,200GW in the next five years, the equivalent of the total electricity capacity of the US.“This is a pivotal time for renewable energy,” said the IEA’s executive director, Fatih Birol. “Technologies such as solar photovoltaics (PV) and wind are at the heart of transformations taking place across the global energy system. Their increasing deployment is crucial for efforts to tackle greenhouse gas emissions, reduce air pollution, and expand energy access.”The Guardian reported earlier this month that a renewable energy revolution could end the world’s rising demand for oil and coal in the 2020s, decades ahead of forecasts from oil and mining companies.Renewable energy sources make up 26% of the world’s electricity today, but according to the IEA its share is expected to reach 30% by 2024. The resurgence follows a global slowdown last year, due to falling technology costs and rising environmental concerns. However, Birol warned that the role of renewables in the global energy system would need to grow even faster if the world hopes to meet its climate targets.The IEA expects solar energy to play the biggest role in jumpstarting fresh growth in global renewable energy because falling costs are already below retail electricity prices in most countries. The cost of solar power is expected to decline by a further 15% to 35% by 2024, spurring further growth over the second half of the decade.More: Renewable energy to expand by 50% in next five years – reportlast_img read more

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Syosset Man Charged With Fatal Hit-and-run

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York A Syosset man has been arrested for allegedly killing a 13-year-old girl in a hit-and-run crash while the victim was crossing a road in her hometown of Levittown, Nassau County police said.Michael Elardo was charged with leaving the scene of an incident when he surrendered to Homicide Squad detectives on Monday, a day after the crash, police said.The 48-year-old suspect was driving a minivan eastbound on Hempstead Turnpike when he fatally struck Brianna Soplin at the corner of Gardiners Avenue and fled without stopping shortly after midnight Sunday, police said.The victim died four hours later at Nassau University Medical Center.Elardo and will be arraigned Tuesday at First District Court in Hempstead.last_img read more

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Five things I know for sure about NPS and credit unions

first_img 55SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr,Sarah Bang Sarah Canepa Bang is President/COO of CO-OP Shared Branching – FSCC, and Chief Strategy Officer, CO-OP Shared Branching. She can be reached at sarah.bang@co-opfs.org and 888-372-2669, ext. 1205. Web: www.co-opfs.org Details Introduced in 2003, Net Promoter Score, or NPS, allows organizations, including credit unions, to more easily and effectively measure member loyalty and tie it to growth.CO-OP itself is clearly a “Promoter” of NPS (a customer ready to give their provider a 9 or 10 out of 10 in terms of loyalty). Here are five reasons why.1. NPS adoption led to the Member Loyalty Group.San Francisco Fire FCU was the first credit union in the nation to ask the ultimate question. “On a scale from 0 to 10, how likely is it that you would recommend your credit union to a friend, family member or colleague?” The year was 2006 and shortly after SF Fire started using NPS to measure member satisfaction, they helped to form Member Loyalty Group in combination with Educators CU in Wisconsin, BCU, BECU, America First, and First Technology CU. This CUSO was designed to help credit unions give their members a voice. Don’t you love that?So, nine years later, how’s this all working for SF Fire? If you check SF Fire on Yelp, you’ll see 193 reviews with 4.5 stars – that’s fantastic, but when you start reading the comments, it’s enough to make you shed tears of joy. One member wrote, “I love this credit union. And I cite finding this credit union through Yelp three years ago as my #1 reason why I love Yelp.” O.K., where do I sign up?2. I love that NPS measures the voice of the member in a relevant and meaningful way.While working for various leagues, one of my duties was attending credit union annual meetings. There were generally two types. The first (and most fun) was the Annual Meeting/Social Event of the Community meeting. It was a party and I loved them. These events are a very nice “thank you,” but offer little in the way of communication from the member.The second type was the one at 3 p.m. on Thursday with a quorum made up of board members, staff and spouses. If a regular member wandered in, everyone broke into a cold sweat trying to find the Robert’s Rules of Order cheat sheet. What if the member wanted to say anything or God forbid, make a motion? Even if CU officials were delighted the member(s) wanted to participate, the annual meeting was almost always a one-way conversation. NPS programs provide members with a voice and show that a credit union is committed to hearing those voices.3. We have no idea what it’s like to be a member of our own credit unions or CUSOs.The rules, the hold times, the procedures – we know why they are all very necessary and important, but when viewed from the perspective of a member, it looks more like, “Please put the merchandise down and leave; we don’t want your business.”NPS gives us a window into how the member sees us.4. Your members are already talking about you, and it’s time you joined the conversation.If you don’t believe me, all you have to do is search Twitter for “Hate Banks” and then “Hate CUs”. The “Hate Banks” search will bring up folks who hate their bank and want to join a CU. If you run the search on the mornings after “America’s Next Top Model” airs, you’ll also see how many people really dislike Tyra Banks. But then search “Hate Credit Unions” and hold your breath. It might be helpful to remember the title of that customer service book, “A Complaint is a Gift,” to get you through the experience. Even if they aren’t talking about your own CU, you’ll get good insight into what bothers members enough to go public. But NPS also helps amplify your promoters and reading some of their comments will make you feel a whole lot better.5. NPS gets you off the dime.Once you get into the conversation, and you’re faced with a complaint, you must close the loop within 48 hours – you must follow-up with the dissatisfied party. I promise you’ll be glad you did. This is the quickest way to make a detractor into a promoter.Years ago while working at CUNA, a big part of my job was to go to the leagues making sure they knew we heard their complaints. I used to return to Madison wilted and weary. “Yeah, it was a rough meeting, but we’re good…we’re good.” The truth was I loved this part of my job. Many of my best friends in this business are the ones to whom I’ve offered my sincerest apologies. I didn’t want to give that up, so I got really good at wilted and weary and never had to worry that someone else might want to do it. I can tell you from personal experience, you’ll be glad you closed the loop.So, there you have five reasons to get off the dime right now, do something that will help put you in better touch with your members and register for the Loyalty Live Conference here.last_img read more

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FA President satisfied with congress outcome

first_imgThe President of the Ghana Football Association Kwasi Nyantakyi has expressed satisfaction at the deliberations and outcome of this year’s ordinary congress.The one-day congress held at the Ghanaman Soccer of Excellence on Wednesday brought together all delegates from the Association’s body to deliberate on issues for the upcoming season.Among some of the key things that the Association touched on was a new directive for the reserve league.According to congress only players under seventeen years will be eligible to play in the reserve league next two seasons.President of the Ghana FA Kwasi Nyantakyi who presided over the congress in an interview with Joy sports stated how swiftly the one day congress was.“This has been the swiftest congress I have ever attended or presided over, the issues were dealt with very professionally and straight to the point, there was no waste of time and indulgence of unnecessary talk and delegates were on point in their deliberations,” said Nyantakyi “Sometimes when people research the issues that are to be discussed at congress, it helps in getting the discussions through quickly.“I believe that delegates read the documents that were given them two weeks before congress, they also did their researches on what was going to be discussed so we had a very smooth deliberations.”Also in attendance was the Youth and Sports Minister Elvis Afriyie Ankrah.last_img read more

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Port Commission Will Consider Marine Terminal Master Plan And Supplemental Environmental…

first_imgFacebook2Tweet0Pin0 Submitted by The Port of OlympiaThe Port Commission’s July 14agenda includes an advisory on the proposed Marine Terminal Master Plan and a Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement (SEIS) for each of the Port districts, beginning with the Marine Terminal District. Commission action on this item is anticipated for the August 11 meeting.Also on the agenda is the Commission’s consideration of bids to construct Warehouse B. The Commission could go forward with warehouse construction or potentially reject all bids.The Port’s SEPA (State Environmental Policy Act) determination and the City of Olympia’s land use approval decision on Warehouse B are final and not subject to further review or challenge. However, the Port’s Final Environmental Impact Statement (FEIS) dates back to 1994. While the FEIS’s underlying assumptions and analyses of the general land uses of Port properties are valid, the age of the FEIS and its many revisions and addenda to support current planning over the years make it unwieldy in terms of analysis and implementation.If approved by the Commission at its August 11 meeting, the Marine Terminal Master Plan and SEIS project is anticipated to take 18 to 24 months to complete, exclusive of any appeals. This timeline includes preparing the Request for Qualifications, solicitation and award of contracts, preparation of the draft and final SEIS documents, and public comment.The Marine Terminal Master Plan would not be effective until the Commission adopts it as part of the Comprehensive Scheme of Harbor Improvements and Capital Budget. Both include public process.The Marine Terminal’s SEIS—and the SEIS for each Port district—would thoroughly assess and document the environmental impacts of planned future re-design or expansion projects. The Port would use each district’s SEIS to provide SEPA review for the district’s elements of the Comprehensive Scheme of Harbor Improvements and Budget adoption for those elements.The SEIS process essentially follows standard Environmental Impact Statement procedures. Issuance of the SEIS and any associated appeal process are governed by the SEPA statute, implementing SEPA regulations, and the Port’s adopted SEPA Policy Resolution that is then in effect. The Port Commission is currently considering revisions to its SEPA Policy Resolution.The public is invited to the Commission meeting on Monday, July 14, 5:30 PM, at the Olympia Center, 222 Columbia St. NW, Olympia 98501.last_img read more

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Not Self, But Country

first_imgC.J. Stratton, a retired command master chief and veteran, hoped that this country will take care of its ill and deceased service members and their families. Photo by Tina ColellaWHILE THE NATION observes Armed Forces Day this Saturday, and Memorial Day next weekend, the heroes who should be receiving accolades and memorial services on both observances must also include the Clyde Jay Strattons of the world who join the military, do their job efficiently, quietly and thoroughly, and never ask for a moment’s praise or thanks for their sacrifices.Stratton, an octogenarian and great grandfather, can tick off dozens of names of what he knows are “real heroes,” the guys who were on battlefields from Korea through Vietnam through Desert Storm and more, the young kids who didn’t come home, the men and women who came home but were broken in mind or body as well as all the military men and women in the nation’s forces during one or both of the world wars.But Stratton – make that retired Command Master Chief C.J. Stratton –whether he likes it or not, is also a hero, the kind of guy who stays till the job is done, does it right, takes care of his sailors, and in the end, simply hopes and prays for an America where we truly take care of our ill, sick, wounded and deceased military and their families.This genial, humble and hardworking man chalked up his life history in an unusual way, but along its route, carved out several different occupations and created several important niches that even today are helping to keep the military the proud and distinguished units that they are.An Ohio native, Stratton was always a flying enthusiast, reveling in the Civil Air Patrol’s work before he was a teenager, signing up himself for the volunteer position as soon as he was 15 and eligible.At the start of the Korean War, he enlisted in the Navy, despite all his friends’ warning him he’d be shipped out soon. By the grace of God and the luck of the draw, he never did see service in Korea, though many of his friends who were later drafted did. Stratton had signed up as an air crewman “not because I was a hero, but because it paid $50 a month more that I would have gotten as a medical equipment repairman,” he said.Though the Navy’s PV2 planes, twin-tailed planes were determined to be too old for battle and hence didn’t go into Korea, he was still part of America’s fighting force that prepared and were ready to go wherever needed on a minute’s notice. Instead, he went to South America; what he recalls is that his brother served eight years in the Navy, five of them in the South Pacific during World War II. “That’s a real hero,” he exclaims, always eager to deflect attention from himself.You don’t have to ask Stratton to name more heroes, he’s got them all on the tip of his tongue: “Here’s another one for you, my good friend, Dick O’Shaughnessy, who died recently. He was an enlisted man and he earned the Distinguished Service Cross … think of that, an enlisted man with that high honor! That’s a hero. And my grandson, a young fella, who picked up something in Kenya and is now medically discharged from the Navy … these are heroes, not me.”When the active duty forces were reduced at the end of the Korean conflict, Stratton opted to stay in the Reserves while still searching for a job to support his new status as husband. He had no desire to go back into the family contracting business in Ohio, so when he heard there was an advertisement for an instructor at the Army’s Signal School at Fort Monmouth, he thought it was the best use he could make of his Navy-training as an electronics technician. At that time all he knew about New Jersey was what he had heard of fouls smells, pig farms and oil refineries. He remembered flying over Lakehurst Naval Station and thinking it was all swampland so he wasn’t holding out any hope for an attractive new home. He still chuckles heartily when he recalls getting off the train at the Little Silver railroad station and thinking it was so beautiful and wonderful he must be in Connecticut instead. And walking from the station to Fort Monmouth, he realized that once again, good for tune was following him. That was in June, 1952 and Stratton began his new position, while still remaining in the Reserves and doing his weekend training at NWS Station Earle in Colts Neck.For the next 35years, Stratton continued as an instructor at the signal school. But that isn’t all he did. Recalling his days and all he had learned in the Civil Air Patrol, he wondered why the Navy didn’t have a similar program. Lakehurst had a Sea Cadet program, the first in the country, so Stratton decided to start the second in the country at Earle. Assisted by another friend and Navy hero, the late Capt. Joseph Azzolina, he started the program which is still active at Earle, teaching teen boys and girls the mission and discipline of the US Navy while at the same time giving them experiences they may not other wise have in travel and education. Three of Stratton’s own children signed up for the Sea Cadet program at Earle over the next few years.At Fort Monmouth, Stratton was the executive officer of the MSE program and received a summary of his status report one day. When he contacted personnel to ask what it was about, and was told it meant he was eligible to retire at any time with a comfortable pension, he laughingly told them to make it official that afternoon. He did retire in 1987 – but the army called him back to serve as a consultant for its reorganization at the Signal Corps School for another six years. And still he remained an active reservist. It wasn’t until 1992 – five years after his official retirement as a civilian – when Command Master Chief Clyde Stratton retired from the US Navy, after a career that spanned 42 years.
 But those years when he was both a reservist and working for the Department of Defense were good years, this veteran recalls. When the Navy needed him for temporary duty –for instance, to step up to be the Command Master Chief at Newport when the CMC there was ill – it was comparatively easy to take leave from his government job to complete his military mission. His Navy experience, education and connections were also helpful when he was called on to help create the MSE, Mobil Subscriber Equipment communication system of linked switching nodes that provide the force with an area common-user system (ACUS). It is one of the major communications systems of an Army force at echelons corps and below (ECB). The system is digital and flexible, providing voice and data communications on an automatic, discrete-addressed, fixed-directory basis, supporting mobile and wire subscribers with a means to exchange command, control communications, computers, and intelligence, making it the system that developed what is today’s cell phone for use in the military.Looking back, it’s been an active, happy, busy–but in his terms, no way a heroic – life for this very proud Command Master Chief. One in which he has been proud and humbled to work for the country and be in the company of men and women who have given their lives to protect it.But for Americans who look to our military for safety, security, and protection, CMC Stratton can certainly be ranked up there with the best of them.last_img read more