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A proud Jamaican – Mayhew satisfied following history-making Youth Olympics bobsled run

first_img “Overall, I am satisfied with my performance here. I have gained a lot of experience now, and I hope that I can continue with bobsled along with the other things that I want to do,” added the aspiring pilot. Mayhew, a student of Charlemont High in St Catherine, had a decent push-off in his first run, registering a start time of 5.67 seconds. He was solid throughout, even if he did not generate the speeds he would have liked, topping off at 106.2 km/h (the slowest among the competitors) and having a brush with Turn 13 before crossing the line in 58.85 seconds. This was 1.92 seconds slower than Ivanov, who was the leader at that stage of the competition. His second run was slightly better as he again got a good push-off time 5.67 seconds (10th best) and improved his top speed to 107.5 km/h to end the course in 58.62 seconds. “I know I can do better I have done better before, so I know I can. So, hopefully, I can continue in the sport and improve and always represent my country and make everyone proud,” Mayhew added. The Jamaican has been a hit with the crowd and the international media in Norway since his arrival and it was no different on the course yesterday. “I am glad that I got the opportunity to compete here. I received a lot of support from everyone here. Everyone was cheering for me and it was an extraordinary feeling. I think it was a factor which helped me to get my fastest push time,” he shared. “The competition was close, especially for the top guys. It was good for me. I did my best push time today, so it was a good feeling that I improved that. My overall track time wasn’t a personal best or the best that I could have done, but it was enough to cross the finish line and finish 13th, so I am satisfied,” Mayhew said. His coach, Harry Nelson, is the man behind his development from a teenager who had little interest in competing in sport, to one of the best young Monobob athletes on the planet after a year of training. Nelson was overwhelmed with the youngster’s efforts. “It’s an overwhelming feeling,” Nelson told The Sunday Gleaner. “Seeing the support we as Jamaicans got and that even though we didn’t get the best time of the series, I am very proud of him. It was a proud moment to see him complete the track,” Nelson said. “And to get his personal best start time of 5.67 seconds is also a very good accomplishment for him. The pair will return to the island on Wednesday. Jamaican youngster Daniel Mayhew says he is extremely proud following his 13th-place finish in the Monobob competition at the Winter Youth Olympics in Lillehammer, Norway yesterday. The 17-year-old, who is the first Jamaican participant at the Winter Youth Olympic Games, registered times of 58.85 and 58.62 seconds in his two runs for a combined time of 1:57.47 which placed him 13th in the 15-man field taking part in the event. The gold medal was won by Germany’s Jonas Jannusch, who recorded a time of 1:54.29, with the silver medal going to Russia’s Maksim Ivanov, 1:54.22, Norway’s Kristian Olsen (1:54.53) took the bronze medal. Speaking to The Sunday Gleaner shortly after his run yesterday, Mayhew, who was remarkably only introduced to the bobsleigh event just under a year ago, said he would have loved to finish in the top three, but is very proud to have represented his country so well and against the odds. “I am a little sad that I didn’t get a medal, but I really feel good in myself and proud that I was able to come here and compete at the Youth Olympics and make everyone proud,” said Mayhew. SATISFIEDlast_img read more

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Building, utilising local content imperative to moving sector forward

first_imgOil and gas sector…as GMSA members benefit from local business development courseSeveral high ranking Private Sector officials and members of the Guyana Manufacturing and Services Association (GMSA) have benefited from an ongoing course and in-depth discussion on the role of local content in the development of Guyana’s emerging oil and gas sectors.GMSA President Shyam NoktaThe course was delivered by the Director of the Centre for Local Business Development (CLBD), Patrick Henry, and Senior Business Specialist Natasha Gaskin-Peters in the conference room of the Centre, which is located on South Road, Bourda.The main focus of the course was to give suppliers an understanding of the core concepts of local content while also exploring the common barriers to entering the oil and gas supply chain. It also saw participants benefiting from a presentation which highlighted a number of ways in which they could benefit from the limitless opportunities that would become available as a result of the emerging sectors.In brief remarks, GMSA President Shyam Nokta underscored the importance of the course and the need for industry and GMSA members to familiarise themselves with the changing dynamics that will take place in Guyana’s economy as a result of the oil exploration, development and production activities that will take place in the sector.He thanked all of the participants for demonstrating continued interest in the work of the Business Development Centre as he encouraged them to utilise all of the services it is currently offering businesses that are free.Meanwhile, Henry also welcomed the business representatives and GMSA members to the course which he said was only one step in securing a holistic and informed view of what really constitutes an effective local content policy.Henry said businesses should also strive to understand the concept of “value added” and the resources available locally to drive investments and maximise opportunities that will become available over the next few years.During a PowerPoint presentation which was delivered largely by Peters, participants heard some of the local barriers for suppliers who are seeking to benefit from the emerging oil and gas sectors and the concept of value added are insufficient knowledge of the industry development process and timelines, failure to meet industry standards, and non-compliance with health, safety and security and environment requirements. Other barriers included lack of proven experience and demonstrated track record, accessing new sources of finance for new capital investments and understanding how to do business using e-procurement systems with IOCs.The GMSA members and other officials were also made aware of the challenges related to local content. These include competitiveness, procurement and sourcing, business environment and the structure of the economy.The course facilitators also informed participants on the key to winning contracts which they said was related to how competitive their businesses and partnerships were when compared to others who were likely to provide the similar products.They were advised that in order to become more competitive, focus had to be placed on addressing issues related to capacity, cost and price, financial strength, market experience, quality standards, timelines, workforce skills, upstream capabilities, and safety record.During the three-hour event, GMSA members were also broken up into groups and asked to coin their own definitions of what Guyana’s local content policy should be before an open discussion was held on the significance of those definitions as well as the implications.last_img read more