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Wind and solar continue to win the global electricity-cost war

first_imgWind and solar continue to win the global electricity-cost war FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享Bloomberg New Energy Finance:In terms of the long-term trajectory for coal, BloombergNEF has become significantly more bearish than the IEA. Its 2019 New Energy Outlook, or NEO, published in June, saw global coal-fired electricity output peaking as early as 2026, and then declining 4% by 2030 and by as much as 53% by 2050.The other side of the coin in generation during the decade just ending has been the meteoric rise of wind, and particularly solar. Back at the time of the Copenhagen conference at the end of 2009, almost no one would have imagined that solar power – with just 25 gigawatts of capacity operating worldwide at that point, all of it at a significant cost premium to other technologies – would become the most installed generation source of the new decade.However, that is exactly what happened. The report Global Trends in Renewable Energy Investment 2019, published last month by UN Environment Programme and Frankfurt School and based on data and analysis from BNEF, estimated that over the 2010-2019 period, some 638 gigawatts of solar power will have been added, outpacing coal’s 529 gigawatts of net new additions, wind’s 487 gigawatts and gas-fired generation’s 438 gigawatts.That stellar performance by solar has come about, of course, in large part because of cost declines – declines that would also have seemed almost inconceivable 10 years ago. BNEF’s latest Levelized Cost of Electricity Update, covering the second half of 2019 and published last week, showed that the all-in cost of generation for solar photovoltaics without tracking systems has tumbled 83% since 2009, reaching just $51 per megawatt-hour. That is a global benchmark – the levelized cost is even lower in some locations.That new figure, and a closely matched equivalent for onshore wind of $47 per MWh, down 49% over the decade, means that two-thirds of the world population are living in countries where either solar or wind is now the cheapest choice for electricity generation in terms of all-in costs.More: Clean Energy’s Decade Nearly Gone, And Its Decade Aheadlast_img read more

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‘Learning Loop’ powers progress

first_imgBusiness organizations can advance more productively toward achieving their missions by acting on five questions that make up a “learning loop,” suggests a new book by Partners Federal Credit Union CEO John Janclaes, a CUES member.In Doing What Matters: How Leaders Help Individuals and Organizations Thrive, Janclaes describes a recursive process in which business leaders guide their teams to consider:What is going on? The team assesses current performance with both inside-out and outside-in views informed by qualitative and quantitative data.What really matters? To answer this question, focus on customer orientation, identifying stakeholders’ needs and examining the organization’s economic engines, or what drives financial performance.What are our options? By casting a wide net for ideas and staying open-minded about all available possibilities, the team is more likely to find the most effective solutions to optimize organizational potential. continue reading » 4SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblrlast_img read more