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In restructuring, PG&E ‘will have to cater to customers who have other ways to meet their power needs’

first_img FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享Wall Street Journal:When it emerges from what is expected to be a long and complex chapter 11 reorganization, it’s likely to be a very different business—no longer the sprawling provider of natural gas and electric service to 16 million Californians.While wildfire liabilities that PG&E pegged at more than $30 billion were the main factor behind its bankruptcy filing, the San Francisco-based company faces far broader challenges. Long a utility accustomed to having a monopoly, in the future it will have to cater to customers who have other ways to meet their power needs.The traditional business model of electric utilities is under siege as homeowners, corporations and new community groups seek to generate or purchase power for themselves, a trend that is particularly advanced in California. All the while, PG&E has become deeply intertwined with California’s renewable energy and carbon-reduction goals, requiring it to sign expensive long-term contracts while also facing political pressure to keep rates from rising too fast.All options are going to be on the table in a bankruptcy proceeding, experts say. The possibilities include breaking up the company, selling off its natural-gas business or shedding some of its more than 100 hydroelectric dams. San Francisco and other cities have also said they want to explore running their own utilities in what has been PG&E territory.All options are going to be on the table in a bankruptcy proceeding, experts say. The possibilities include breaking up the company, selling off its natural-gas business or shedding some of its more than 100 hydroelectric dams. San Francisco and other cities have also said they want to explore running their own utilities in what has been PG&E territory.“There’s a larger issue at hand regarding how utilities are coping with new technology,” Mr. Peskoe said. “Maybe this is an opportunity for the industry to think about this differently.”PG&E said in the bankruptcy filing that it wants the ability to end hundreds of long-term power contracts with wind and solar farms, a move that could hurt the nation’s renewable-energy industry. PG&E has $42 billion in contractual commitments to buy electricity, more than half for wind and solar power to meet California’s aggressive renewable-energy goals. NextEra Energy Inc., a Florida utility with a large renewable-power-generation business has asked the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission to assert jurisdiction over these contracts. The commission ruled last week that it would review the matter alongside the bankruptcy judge.California Gov. Gavin Newsom has also expressed worries about the potential cancellation of the contracts, which could hurt the state’s ability to meet aggressive goals to cut greenhouse-gas emissions and combat climate change.More($): Wildfires Drove PG&E to Bankruptcy, Where Utility Must Change to Survive In restructuring, PG&E ‘will have to cater to customers who have other ways to meet their power needs’last_img read more

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February 15, 2006 Letters

first_img February 15, 2006 Letters February 15, 2006 Letters Letters Constitutional Questions Kelo v. City of New London CT., 125 S. Ct. 2655 (U.S. 2005), angered many elected officials and commentators. They wanted the U.S. Supreme Court to protect individual property rights from popularly elected officials — by using judicial activism to expand condemnation’s “public use” requirement.The public use requirement springs from the Fifth Amendment to the U.S. Constitution, though the Fifth Amendment’s text does not explicitly impose it. The 14th Amendment’s “penumbra” incorporates the Fifth Amendment, and applies it to states and municipalities.These officials and commentators want justices to return to the “original intent” and limited powers of the U.S. Constitution. (Did the Founding Fathers mean the Cripps, El Rukns, and Jolly Stompers, when they wrote “a well-regulated militia,” and “the right of the people to keep and bear arms”?)The president claims he has unlimited war powers in an undeclared war, and continues to tolerate that particular abomination to the Founding Fathers — paper money, unbacked by silver or gold. Irony flourishes in American judicial politics. John P. Fenner Boca Raton Wheelchair-reliant Lawyer Kudos to Gov. Jeb Bush and Sen. Ken Pruitt for trying to help newly admitted attorney Aaron Bates. The wheelchair-reliant Bates deserves to work as an assistant state attorney. This can only occur with state assistance to pay for a personal assistant. Now, he will only get state assistance if he doesn’t work.State resources already helped Bates graduate from Florida State University with a undergraduate and law degrees. After Bates worked hard at FSU for six years and then passed the bar, it would be a waste if he sat home.Assistance should be extended for people in Bates’ situation. Given budgetary concerns, perhaps a sliding scale of subsidy could be provided. Thus Bates, and others similarly situated, could get financial assistance proportionate to salary.Given Bates obvious talent and determination, if the state helps him start his career, he may eventually gain full independence. Without such help, the state may need to provide lifetime resources only so people like Bates sit at home despite their ability and desire to work. Aaron M. Clemens West Palm Beach Fairness and Diversity I just have spent more than three hours responding to a survey solicited by the Florida Supreme Court’s Standing Committee on Fairness and Diversity for the state court system.The survey solicited my view as an attorney. I finished it three hours later, satisfactorily. I was so impressed that I followed instructions to apply for further participation.What I noticed at the outset was that the survey also solicited the views separately of parties. I was grateful that the courts were soliciting the public for its view.So I started over and presumed I would be able to give my pro se perspective. For more than 30 years, I have brought civil actions pro se, and occasionally defended criminal actions pro se, in addition to my regular practice, the last 20 as a solo practitioner in Florida. With a rare free day, at 70 years old, I thought enough of the project to spend another three hours to respond to the survey from a lay perspective. I am treated differently when I appear pro se than when I do as a party.So I began the survey offered to parties. The first 13 questions concerned my agreement/disagreement about certain preliminary matters, and my bullet perceptions of various forms of discrimination in the legal system.As a lawyer, I earlier was given and encouraged to give in detail my knowledge of incidents, structural problems, etc., item by item, re: race, gender, age, disability, even income. That’s why it took me three hours to complete.But as a party I suddenly found myself at question 14: “Please tell us anything else you can to help us improve the fairness of Florida’s court system.”I wrote spontaneously: “This is discrimination of the worst kind. You clearly don’t want to know what people other than lawyers, judges, legal professionals think. Perhaps the survey is more solicitous of jurors. I did not answer in that category because I have never been a juror.”As an attorney who has taken the survey offered to elicit the views of Florida lawyers I found it was fair and complete. I took the version given to parties in the belief that I would have a similar opportunity. This abbrieviated form shows the state court system’s arrogance in conducting this survey and showing concern only for my views as a lawyer, but not as a party.The U.S. Supreme Court dissenters in 2000 in Gore v. Bush apparently knew what they were talking about when they accused the pro-Bush majority of not trusting the Florida state court system. What I didn’t realize then was that the majority apparently had good reason not to trust the Florida state courts to be fair.But there is an uglier punchline. I was asked on the survey for parties to provide my household income. The survey had not asked for my income as an attorney. Gabe Kaimowitz Gainesville Ober Praise A great deal has been written about the recent release of yet another innocent person from Florida’s prisons, but we have not heard all that much about the conduct of State Attorney Mark Ober and his staff.I write to thank Ober and the people of his office who worked in a cooperative and constructive way with the people who were seeking to establish Alan Crotzer’s claim of innocence.It might seem like a basic duty of the state attorney to help identify a bona fide claim of innocence but, sadly, not all prosecutors adhere to their duty in the way that Ober and his staff have done in the Crotzer case.We owe Ober thanks for his humility and for his willingness to take an honest look at the evidence that sent an innocent citizen to prison. Talbot D’Alemberte Tallahasseelast_img read more

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Redcliffe home brings the outdoors in

first_imgThe open-plan living area opens to the back patio.“The open plan kitchen that flows out onto the alfresco area because it’s just glass sliding doors that open the whole thing up,” he said.“So we put a really big pool in and an outdoor covered area around the pool, as well for the hotter days … and plenty of grass.”He says the backyard is his favourite place.Mr Piper said they would miss living in the friendly Clontarf community, but new adventures awaited them.“It’s time for us to move on and do other things.” The property is being marketed by Frank De Raadt from Kindred real estate agency. The home at 171 Duffield Rd, Clontarf“It was a mad rush to get the Christmas tree up,” says Mark Piper about moving into their just-built house in December 2015.But they made the deadline and got to enjoy the festive season in their new home.“You put a lot of time and effort into getting it right,” he said.Fast forward two years and Mr Piper, his wife, Bec, and their three daughters have an opportunity to travel overseas, so it’s time to move on and let the next family enjoy this holiday-at-home residence.Mr Piper said the home at 171 Duffield Rd, Clontarf will appeal to buyers who appreciate the great outdoors. The home at 171 Duffield Rd, Clontarf“We wanted to make a private family retreat where you can do all your entertaining under the roof,” he said.More from newsLand grab sees 12 Sandstone Lakes homesites sell in a week21 Jun 2020Tropical haven walking distance from the surf9 Oct 2019“That’s why we put in a big alfresco.”Mr Piper said they also wanted comfortable living, so they included modern conveniences and beautiful fittings.“Stone benchtops on every surface, European appliances all built in … coffee machine, wine cooler, high ceilings and ducted air conditioning.”He said when visitors strolled through, they loved the finishes, but it was the indoor/outdoor layout that impressed the most.last_img read more

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Metta World Peace puts more blame on “system” in recent shootings

first_imgHe was there technically to speak on behalf of the Mental Health in Schools Act, which would have raised $200 million in grant funding to 200 schools. He also outlined the importance that mental health services would have on impoverished schools. But World Peace said he also argued that police officers, firefighters, teachers and security guards should both receive pay raises and be required to take psychology classes to better understand the people they are serving. “I’ve been trying to do it for a long time. It’s hard when you’re not somebody who has connections,” World Peace said. “I’ve been telling people to put those things in place. Sometimes they don’t listen. I met with (U.S. House Democratic leader) Nancy Pelosi. I met with the Republicans. I met with everybody.” The pitch did not work. That partly explains why World Peace said he filed papers to join the New York City council during his lone season with the Knicks (2013-14). Whenever his NBA career ends, World Peace expressed interest in running for city council, either in Compton or Inglewood. World Peace offered a nuanced platform on the issue involving law enforcement and black men. Though he argued every recent officer involved in the fatal shootings should resign, World Peace admitted in general terms that “you can’t lock up every officer for making a mistake.”He believed officers should only serve in an area they had lived at previously. And he explained why required psychology courses would diminish any incidents from happening. “You need police officers training to protect and serve, of course. But you can’t always be looking out for bad things,” World Peace said. “At the end of the day, if you train a pitbull to bite, the pitbull will bite.”Then, World Peace narrowed in on the school system. “The urban communities’ parents have been separated. So now you have a situation where these kids are being raised by the street environments,” World Peace said. “They need to put more emphasis on what it takes to be a good father, a good mother and a good partner. Instead of just focusing on math, science and reading, they also need to teach about the need to change the way we live.”Based on his own following of news accounts and friends’ experiences, World Peace pinned 80 percent of the fatal shootings toward officers becoming “too aggressive,” while placing 20 percent blame on “people disrespecting officers.” World Peace also expressed sympathy for black men becoming punished for what he called “petty crimes,” such as selling cigarettes on the street. Nonetheless, World Peace found plenty of reasons for the police stopping him during his childhood only a handful of times for speeding and playing music loudly in his car. “My experience was, ‘Don’t sell drugs and don’t do violence.’ You will be arrested,” World Peace said. “I never got pulled over for anything I felt like was uncalled for. Every time I see an officer, I always say ‘I’m sorry for whatever I did.’ My parents always taught me to respect officers and do what the officers say.”So, World Peace has outlined strict rules to his children, Sade (19), Ron (17), Jeron (15) and Diamond (12). “My kids must respect all people,” World Peace said. “That’s a staple in my house. That’s the only rule I have in my house.”Will World Peace’s other rules become effective enough to stop the law enforcement shootings? Can they bridge a relationship between police officers and black civilians? On a day filled with frustration, World Peace offered some hope. “I feel confident in people,” World Peace said. “I feel my kids will be OK.” “It’s super chaotic,” World Peace said. “People died that should not have died.”World Peace, the former Laker and current free agent, represented one of many athletes expressing frustration on Friday over the recent shootings. Yet, World Peace’s childhood and his heavy involvement with mental health charities offered him a unique perspective on what he saw as a growing distrust between law enforcement and the black community. As he lived in an unstable home environment stemming from separated parents and incarcerated friends, World Peace often sought counseling to treat anger issues. After becoming infamous for his role in the Palace Brawl in 2004, World Peace’s role in helping the Lakers win the 2010 NBA title provided him a bigger platform to promote his mental health advocacy with his foundation at Xcel University. “I trust cops. If I die trusting cops, so be it,” World Peace said. “What I don’t trust is the system.”So in 2011, World Peace testified before Congress in hopes to change the system. Newsroom GuidelinesNews TipsContact UsReport an Errorcenter_img The incident seemed just as unexpected as achieving Metta World Peace’s last name. After growing up in Queens, N.Y. in an area stricken with poverty, drug abuse and violence, the former Ron Artest reflected on a childhood that entailed experiences with law enforcement that had little to do with racial profiling or wrongful arrests. Instead, World Peace remembered one surprising episode that illustrated the police and minorities coexisting. “Officers played basketball with me in the middle of the hood,” World Peace recalled in an interview with Southern California News Group. “Two officers put their guns on the ground. Anybody could have picked up their guns. But they were on the ground and they played basketball with us.” World Peace then remembered thinking, “I love police officers.” Yet, those feelings have become more clouded this week amid two shootings of black men by police, as well as the killing of at least five Dallas police officers. last_img read more