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10 months agoKeane: Man Utd must sell Pogba

first_imgTagsTransfersAbout the authorPaul VegasShare the loveHave your say Keane: Man Utd must sell Pogbaby Paul Vegas10 months agoSend to a friendShare the loveManchester United legend Roy Keane says Paul Pogba needs to be sold.Pogba watched on from the bench as United lost 3-1 at Liverpool yesterday.”I think the players are giving everything. I think there’s one or two players not on top form, Pogba on the bench,” Keane told Sky Sports. “Come the summer you move him on, he’s left United before. I just think they’re short, defensively they’re short.”Man United that’s where they’re at, I guess fourth is the best they can get. If you came down from the Moon and knew nothing about Manchester United, you’d think they were an average Premiership side.”Some of these players are not good enough.” last_img read more

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Fort McKay First Nation holding onto nature in the middle of the

first_img(A reclamation site outside Fort McKay First Nation with a Syncrude  plant in the background. Photo:Brandi Morin/APTN)Brandi Morin APTN National NewsFORT MCKAY FIRST NATION — When Melinda Stewart grew up in Fort McKay she used to fall asleep to the sounds of the frogs croaking outside.Now, Stewart puts her children to bed to the pre-recorded sounds of frogs and nature so that they don’t have to listen to the continuous booming from the nearby tailings ponds.“Now, my children, that’s what they’re used to, listening to cannons going off all night,” said Stewart.She fears that one day her children will become “textbook Aboriginals” because their homelands are disappearing. Tears well up in her eyes as she expresses her lament over the destruction of the environment caused by oil sands activity.“I think in 50 years, our children are going to learn from a textbook how to be native. When I take my children hunting or fishing, if there’s something nice, I tell them to take a picture because when we come back it might not be there…”Fort Mckay is completely surrounded by industrial development and it’s getting closer. So far, they’ve survived, but the long term effects of pollution and other contaminants haven’t yet been fully revealed.Governments and industry talk about reclamation, yet in the decades since oil extraction began, only 0.15 per cent of land has ever been reclaimed.Currently an area the size of Switzerland is being mined with ambitions to further expand production.Alvero Pinto, director of sustainability at Fort McKay said there’s no way the land can ever be reclaimed to its original state. He should know, he’s a mining engineer who once worked for some of the biggest mining companies in the world.Once during a meeting with industry representatives, one of the presenters boasted that industry can reclaim the land and put it back together better than it was before.“And I said, my friend, never make this statement especially to a First Nation because there is no way, nobody can reclaim the land or put back the environment in a better state than it was before,” said Pinto. The community finds some comfort, however in working with industry to incorporate traditional knowledge to reclamation plans. Elders offer advice in exchange for the hope that industry will take it into consideration during the restoring process.Despite all that’s been lost there is one last area of solace that the people of Fort McKay are holding onto. Moose Lake is a part of the reserve located approximately 50 km northwest of Fort McKay and is relatively untouched by industry.Moose Lake, is how people cope, said Dayle Hyde, Fort McKay education director.“It is a sanctuary. It feels like home, hasn’t changed much, and still looks the same as 100 years ago. When people talk about it they say it’s a good place. They heal when they go there.”It is considered sacred to the people of Fort Mckay, sheltered from the fast pace of the world. It’s a place to go to practice culture and traditions, a refuge of peace and quiet, connected to their ancestors. (Video of Moose Lake courtesy: Fort McKay First Nation)“It’s not just a place we want to go camping some weekends,” said Elder Clara Mercer.“Our people live there year round until their children become of age to go to school. Today Moose Lake is all we have left to teach our children and grandchildren our traditional way of life and culture…but industry is coming.”The area surrounding the lake is full of oil and dozens of oil companies are eager to get at it.In 2013, Fort McKay filed an appeal with the Albert Energy Regulator (AER) seeking environmental protection for Moose Lake over a planned site nearby. They requested a 20 km buffer zone be set up, however the AER sided with industry and gave the go ahead.But afterward the developer approached Fort McKay and offered a back deal, with business and financial opportunities, including an 8km buffer zone around the lake.Then, just this past March the Alberta Government signed a letter of intent promising to develop an access management plan for the area surrounding the lake.Despite industry closing in on Fort McKay, Hyde believes the people are still deeply connected to the land, water and animals.Some people have chosen to move away to avoid the environmental effects, but when industry does eventually leave, Fort McKay will still be there. Because it is still a beloved home to many.“I think Fort Mckay is here to stay. This has been happening for years now and we’re still here.We don’t know what’s going to be left but we’re going to deal with it. I think one of the biggest strengths of the people of Fort McKay is that despite the hardships and challenges we’ve faced, we continue to adapt and prevail,” said Hyde.Chief Jim Boucher believes one of the keys to the future is education, job opportunities and entrepreneurialism.“I think Fort McKay is going to be all over the world. We have teachers, police officers, good administrators. Our people are going to be strong and self-sufficient. I’m really optimistic for our community because we have so much potential and ability. It’s up to us to take that opportunity and make that happen.”But Elder Barb Faichney said survival is dependent on striking a balance between nature and industrial activity, however that balance is exceedingly out of proportion due to overdevelopment.“We will say it’s not worth it. But the oil companies will say, ‘yes it was worth it- we walked all over those Indians, but we made money,’” said Faichney.“It shouldn’t have to be like that.”bmorin@aptn.ca@songstress28last_img read more

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The Tories are on an ideological crusade to remov

first_img“The Tories are on an ideological crusade to remove it.“Another important conclusion of the committee was their declared support for a Bill of Rights specifically for the north.“This Bill of Rights was to supplement the Human Rights Act and enhance human rights provision in the north of Ireland.“Its introduction was agreed in the Good Friday Agreement yet the British Government has not made any progress on this matter at all. ShareTweet “Given that we now face a British Government with human rights safeguards firmly in their crosshairs, it is now essential we both protect the Human Rights Act and move towards the introduction of a Bill of Rights for people in the north of Ireland.”ANDERSON WELCOMES UN CONCERNS OVER PLANS TO SCRAP HUMAN RIGHTS ACT was last modified: September 3rd, 2016 by John2John2 Tags: SINN Féin MEP Martina Anderson has said the United Nations is right to be concerned about implications for the North of the British government’s plans to scrap the Human Rights Act.Speaking after the publication of a report by a United Nations Committee, Ms Anderson said;“The United Nations Committee on the Elimination of Racial Discrimination has expressed its concern and opposition to the planned scrapping of the Human Rights Act by the British Government.Speaking after the publication of a report by a United Nations Committee, Ms Anderson said;“The Human Rights Act gives effect to the European Convention on Human Rights, gives people direct access to the European Court of Human Rights and underpins the Good Friday Agreement. ANDERSON WELCOMES UN CONCERNS OVER PLANS TO SCRAP HUMAN RIGHTS ACTBILL OF RIGHTSEUROPEAN COURT OF HUMAN RIGHTSMartina AndersonSINN FEIN MEPlast_img read more

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Alibabas Singles Day Shopping Event Sales Hit 1 Billion in 85 Seconds

first_img 2 min read Fireside Chat | July 25: Three Surprising Ways to Build Your Brand Add to Queue This story originally appeared on Engadget –shares This comes in spite of tariffs and other challenges to Chinese tech. Next Article Alibaba Chinese internet giant Alibaba is fond of crowing about its online shopping records, and that’s truer than ever this year. The company’s annual Global Shopping Festival, aka Singles Day, broke last year’s record by selling $30.8 billion in goods across 230 countries over the space of 24 hours, a hefty 27 percent increase over the $25.3 billion from 2017. However, the initial burst also stood out. It took just 85 seconds for Alibaba to sell its first $1 billion, and an hour to top $10 billion. That’s well past U.S. holiday sales — for context, Black Friday 2017 “only” generated $5 billion in online sales.The brands that most profited from the event included Apple, Dyson, Gap and Nike, among other big names.While not everyone is necessarily keen to celebrate a shopping frenzy (the event is basically an ode to unfettered consumerism), it’s also no mean feat considering the obstacles Alibaba had to face. U.S. tariffs potentially affected the cost of some products, and the Chinese yuan isn’t worth as much as it was a year earlier. Alibaba also cut its revenue expectations as a result of its less-than-certain future. This suggests that the festival is large enough to be independent of the ups and downs of China — like it or not, it’s a cultural institution for some people. Image credit: Alibaba via engadget November 12, 2018 Jon Fingas Alibaba’s Singles Day Shopping Event Sales Hit $1 Billion in 85 Seconds Learn from renowned serial entrepreneur David Meltzer how to find your frequency in order to stand out from your competitors and build a brand that is authentic, lasting and impactful. Enroll Now for $5last_img read more

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Tech Giants Form Group to Pressure US Over Surveillance

first_img Apply Now » Seven of the nation’s largest technology companies have teamed to pressure the U.S. to scale back its government surveillance programs, demanding five changes in the way the U.S. compiles and uses the data of private citizens.“We understand that governments have a duty to protect their citizens,” the companies wrote in an open letter on the website for their coalition. “But this summer’s revelations highlighted the urgent need to reform government surveillance practices worldwide. The balance in many countries has tipped too far in favor of the state and away from the rights of the individual — rights that are enshrined in our Constitution. This undermines the freedoms we all cherish. It’s time for a change.”The companies involved are Who’s Who list of the American Internet: AOL, Facebook, Google, LinkedIn, Microsoft, Twitter and Yahoo. In one way or another, all were involved in the National Security Agency’s surveillance of Americans and people abroad. The companies have publicly objected to government access to data – in some cases directly through the companies’ own servers. They have also lamented that they were not able to communicate their communications with the government itself, for fear of violating the law. Yahoo CEO Marissa Mayer went so far as to suggest she could be accused of treason if she made disclosures to the public.Related: Amid Surveillance Concerns, Two Companies Shut DownWhile the companies’ letter focuses on individual rights, there is also a big business implication at stake. The Information Technology & Innovation Foundation earlier this year suggested U.S. companies could lose as much as $35 billion over the next three years as businesses and individuals move their data to countries with better data protection.Indeed, Brad Smith, Microsoft’s general counsel, is quoted on the site saying as much. “People won’t use technology they don’t trust,” he wrote. “Governments have put this trust at risk, and governments need to help restore it.”The business coalition wants five key changes:1. Limits on surveillance. In short, the companies are looking for changes in the law that make it harder for the government to force businesses to give up data.2. Better oversight. The coalition is seeking reform to the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court, which approves subpoenas. The group wants that court to be more open and have an adversarial process, like the rest of the federal court system.3. Transparency to customers. A key problem for companies has been their inability to tell customers – and investors – that requests for data had been made by the NSA. The coalition wants more flexibility in disclosing subpoenas to the public.4. Data flow. The group wants the government to allow transfer of data across borders, without having to worry that the NSA will tap data centers overseas.5. Better government coordination. All of the companies operate internationally, and so are subject to different surveillance laws in different countries. The coalition wants a treaty or agreements to standardize practices.Related: Can This Company Save You From The NSA’s Prying Eyes?  3 min read 2019 Entrepreneur 360 List Next Article Ray Hennessey The only list that measures privately-held company performance across multiple dimensions—not just revenue. Technology Tech Giants Form Group to Pressure U.S. Over Surveillancecenter_img December 9, 2013 –shares Opinions expressed by Entrepreneur contributors are their own. Editor-at-Large Add to Queue Image credit: REUTERS/Kacper Pempel Guest Writerlast_img read more

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Minimally invasive surgery for cervical cancer may not be a good idea

first_imgOne of the studies came from the University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center that has already stopped minimally invasive hysterectomies for women with cervical cancer. Dr. Joe-Alejandro Rauh-Hain, a gynecologic cancer specialist at MD Anderson and a co-author to one of the studies says that the team was surprised with the results of the study. He said that they had expected survival rates for both kinds of surgeries to be around the same.Due to the drastically reduced risk of bleeding, pain, infections and surgical complications with keyhole surgeries, they are increasingly being preferred in the US. Rauh-Hain said that after these two studies, the surgeons can no longer recommend minimally invasive surgeries to patients with early stage cervical cancer.Dr. Alexander Melamed of Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School was another co-author of the study. He said that personally he would now refrain from offering “minimally invasive radical hysterectomy” in cervical cancer patients until more research shows that the risks are absent.This first study looked at 2,461 women who were diagnosed with stage 1 cervical cancer between 2010 and 2013. Around half of these women (1225) underwent minimally invasive surgery for hysterectomy while the other got open surgeries. Of the women who underwent keyhole surgeries, 79 percent had be operated using robotic assistance. Authors wrote, “Over a median follow-up of 45 months, the four-year mortality was 9.1 percent among women who underwent minimally invasive surgery and 5.3 percent among those who underwent open surgery.” Women undergoing minimally invasive surgeries were 65 percent more likely to die within the four years following the operation compared. In comparison to 70 women who died within four years after surgery after an open surgery, 94 women undergoing minimally invasive surgery died during the same period.Related StoriesBacteria in the birth canal linked to lower risk of ovarian cancerBordeaux University Hospital uses 3D printing to improve kidney tumor removal surgeryAdding immunotherapy after initial treatment improves survival in metastatic NSCLC patientsIn the second study the researchers randomly assigned 631 women to undergo either open surgery or minimally invasive hysterectomy. These procedures were conducted at 33 hospitals across United States, Brazil, Columbia, Italy, Peru, Australia, Mexico and China. At 4.5 years post-surgery, 95 percent women undergoing traditional open surgeries were disease free compared to 86 percent women undergoing minimally invasive surgery.Dr. Pedro Ramirez, a professor in gynecologic oncology at MD Anderson and one of the researchers on the study explained that for minimally invasive laparoscopic surgery, usually carbon dioxide gas is used to inflate the abdomen to visualize the surgical field. He said that this carbon dioxide gas could play a role in causing the cancer cells to be implanted in different parts of the abdominal cavity while operating.Dr. Shohreh Shahabi, chief of gynecological oncology at Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine was one of the researchers on one of the study teams. He emphasized that these findings are true for cervical cancers alone as of now and there are several other cancers that are being surgically treated using laparoscopic and minimally invasive surgeries.Dr. Amanda N. Fader, director of the Kelly Gynecologic-Oncology Service at Johns Hopkins University wrote an editorial accompanying the studies saying that these results were a “great blow” to minimally invasive surgical approaches for cervical cancer. She said Johns Hopkins has since this stopped keyhole surgeries for cervical cancers and reverted back to open surgeries. By Dr. Ananya Mandal, MDNov 1 2018New research shows that keyhole surgery or minimally invasive laparoscopic robotic surgery could be dangerous in the long run for women with cervical cancer. Unlike open surgeries, minimally invasive surgeries are being increasingly conducted and preferred because of their minimal tissue damage, minimal pain and risk as well as faster recovery. Both studies have been published in the latest issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.The researchers however found that women who were undergoing minimally invasive hysterectomies including some that use robotic surgery for example with the Da Vinci device, are at a greater risk of their cancers coming back compared to women who have had an open surgery. Cervical cancer development. Image Credit: Double Brain / Shutterstockcenter_img Source:https://www.nejm.org/doi/10.1056/NEJMoa1804923 and https://www.nejm.org/doi/10.1056/NEJMoa1806395last_img read more

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Biosense Webster treats first patient in US IDE study of HELIOSTAR RF

first_imgThe STELLAR study is an important step forward in expanding treatment options for atrial fibrillation patients in the United States. The burden of atrial fibrillation on quality of life, morbidity and mortality is significant and we are committed to developing innovative and life-enhancing technologies that fill important clinical needs, improve care and reduce this burden.”Uri Yaron, Worldwide President, Biosense Webster, Inc. The HELIOSTAR catheter design has the potential to overcome the limitations of current balloon ablation catheters, result in fewer catheter exchanges and, most importantly, shorter procedure times. HELIOSTAR is an exciting technology and we look forward to seeing the final study results,”Andrea Natale, M.D., F.H.R.S., F.A.C.C., F.E.S.C., cardiac electrophysiologist and Executive Medical Director, Texas Cardiac Arrhythmia Institute at St. David’s Medical Center “This new balloon catheter is unique because it conforms to any pulmonary vein anatomy and allows me to control electrodes individually to deliver tailored energy when ablating around pulmonary veins,” said cardiac electrophysiologist Rodney Horton, M.D., who treated the first patient in the study with Dr. Andrea Natale at the Texas Cardiac Arrhythmia Institute at St. David’s Medical Center. Related StoriesDePuy Synthes launches nerve assessment platform for spine proceduresBiosense Webster enrolls and treats first AF patient in clinical study of new RF balloon catheterJohnson & Johnson announces FDA clearance to expand indication for Acclarent AERA deviceThe HELIOSTAR RF Balloon Ablation Catheter has 10 electrodes, which allows electrophysiologists to deliver different levels of energy depending on the tissue during lesion creation. In addition, the balloon design makes it possible to achieve pulmonary vein isolation with a single application of RF energy. The device is compatible with the Biosense Webster CARTO 3 Mapping System, an advanced imaging technology that enables creation of real-time 3D maps of a patient’s cardiac structures. The use of the CARTO 3 System during an ablation procedure can reduce exposure to radiation from fluoroscopy.It is estimated that 33 million people worldwide are living with AF, or an irregular heartbeat, which can lead to blood clots, stroke, heart failure and other heart-related complications.center_img Dec 4 2018Johnson & Johnson Medical Devices Companies announced today that Biosense Webster, Inc., a worldwide leader in the diagnosis and treatment of heart arrhythmias, has enrolled and treated the first patient in its STELLAR U.S. Investigational Device Exemption (IDE) study. The study will evaluate the safety and effectiveness of HELIOSTAR Multi-electrode Radiofrequency (RF) Balloon Ablation Catheter in treating symptomatic drug refractory recurrent paroxysmal (intermittent) atrial fibrillation (AF). Up to 640 patients will be enrolled in as many as 40 clinical sites worldwide. Source:https://www.biosensewebster.com/last_img read more

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Study finds new strains of hepatitis C virus in subSaharan Africa

Source:https://www.sanger.ac.uk/news/view/new-strains-hepatitis-c-found-africa Reviewed by Alina Shrourou, B.Sc. (Editor)Dec 17 2018The largest population study of hepatitis C in Africa has found three new strains of the virus circulating in the general population in sub-Saharan Africa. The research from the Wellcome Sanger Institute, the MRC-University of Glasgow Centre for Virus Research and collaborators suggested that certain antiviral drugs currently used in the West may not be as effective against the new strains and that clinical trials of patients in sub-Saharan Africa are urgently needed to assess optimal treatment strategies in this region.Published in the Journal Hepatology, the discovery of the new strains could inform hepatitis C treatment and vaccine development worldwide, and assist the World Health Organisation’s aim of eliminating hepatitis C globally.Hepatitis C is a liver disease caused by the hepatitis C virus (HCV), which is transmitted mainly by needles and exposure to blood products. Infection can cause cirrhosis and liver cancer, and nearly 400,000 people die from hepatitis C each year. Globally, an estimated 71 million people have chronic hepatitis C infection, 10 million of whom live in sub-Saharan Africa and there is no current vaccine.In 2016, the World Health Organisation announced its aim to eliminate hepatitis C as a public health problem by 2030 globally. In the western world, direct-acting antiviral drugs are effective against multiple strains of the virus, and are currently tailored towards strains found in high income countries such as the US and the UK. However, research on HCV in sub Saharan Africa and other low income regions has been extremely limited. Access to diagnosis and treatment is low, and it is not known if different places have the same strains of the virus. This will have a huge impact on eliminating hepatitis C worldwide.To investigate HCV in sub-Saharan Africa, researchers carefully screened the blood of 7751 people from the general population in Uganda and, using molecular methods, found undiagnosed HCV in 20 of these patients. They sequenced the HCV genomes from these and two further blood samples from people born in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) and discovered three completely new strains of the virus, in addition to some strains seen in the west.Related StoriesNanotechnology-based compound used to deliver hepatitis B vaccineStudy reveals link between inflammatory diet and colorectal cancer riskCancer killing capability of lesser-known immune cells identifiedDr George S. Mgomella, joint first author on the paper from the Wellcome Sanger Institute and University of Cambridge, said: “In the largest study of hepatitis C in the general population in sub-Saharan Africa to date, we found a diverse range of hepatitis C virus strains circulating, and also discovered new strains that had never been seen before. Further research is needed as some antiviral drugs are effective against specific strains of hepatitis C virus and may not work as well in these populations.”Dr Emma Thomson, a senior author on the paper from Glasgow University, said: “It is important that there is a concerted effort to characterise hepatitis C strains in sub-Saharan Africa at a population level in order to assist countries to select optimal treatments for national procurement. It will also be important to inform vaccine design which would catalyse the elimination of hepatitis C by 2030.”The researchers discovered that current screening methods using antibody detection were inaccurate in Uganda and that detection of the virus itself would likely be a superior method for diagnosing the infection in high-risk populations. The researchers found that many of the strains present carry mutations in genes known to be associated with resistance to some commonly used antiviral drugs, proving that careful approaches are needed to diagnose and treat HCV effectively in Africa.Dr Manj Sandhu, a senior author on the paper from the Wellcome Sanger Institute and University of Cambridge, said: “Our study highlights the need for more investment on people in Africa and developing parts of the world. We show there are clear differences in HCV across the world, underlining the need for understanding HCV globally. Our work will help inform public health policy and reveals that further studies and clinical trials in sub-Saharan Africa are urgently needed if the WHO is to achieve its vision of eliminating hepatitis C by 2030”. read more

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Study highlights the detrimental effect of prescription opioids on labor markets

first_img Source:https://news.utk.edu/2019/01/28/high-rates-of-opioid-prescriptions-may-be-linked-to-poor-labor-force-participation/ Reviewed by James Ives, M.Psych. (Editor)Jan 29 2019Prescription opioids may be negatively affecting labor force participation and unemployment nationwide, according to findings in a new study co-authored by economists at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville, and published in The Journal of Human Resources.The study, which looked at county-level data from across the US, found that a 10 percent increase in opioid prescriptions per capita led to a 0.6 percentage point drop in labor force participation rates and a 0.1 percentage point increase in county unemployment rates.The study, measuring causal effects of opioids on the labor force, is the first of its kind to be published in a peer-reviewed journal, said Matt Harris, assistant professor in UT’s Boyd Center for Business and Economic research and co-author of the study.Related StoriesResearchers use AI to develop early gastric cancer endoscopic diagnosis systemRaman Spectroscopy as a Universal Analytical Technique for Bodily FluidsAMSBIO offers new, best-in-class CAR-T cell range for research and immunotherapy”The effects are really large,” said Harris. “Prescription opioids may explain up to half of the decline in labor force participation since 2000.”Harris co-authored the paper, “Prescription Opioids and Labor Market Pains,” with UT’s Larry Kessler, Matt Murray, and Beth Glenn, now a postdoctoral scholar at Tulane University. The researchers were prompted to investigate a link between labor markets and opioid usage after employers began asking why no one was applying for job openings.”We found that opioids have this strong adverse effect on labor force participation but only a marginally significant effect on the unemployment rate, which leads us to believe that opioids are leading individuals to exit the labor force entirely,” said Kessler.Tennessee is among the states with the highest number of heavy opioid-prescribing practitioners. On average, providers in Tennessee write 1.4 opioid prescriptions per person per year. At the average dosage per prescription, this rate is equivalent to prescribing 80 opioid doses to every man, woman, and child in Tennessee each year.The researchers emphasize that addressing the opioid epidemic is going to require considerable funding and an increased focus on treatment therapy. In addition to quelling the adverse health effects of the epidemic, they said, there are considerable economic gains to be attained from addressing the core issue of addiction.”The results suggest that in Tennessee, you could effectively boost income among residents by $800 million per year if you reduce opioid usage 10 percent,” said Harris.Other key findings include:* The detrimental effect of prescription opioids on labor markets holds true for both rural and nonrural counties.* Prescription opioids have the strongest adverse effects in counties with higher labor force participation rates and lower unemployment rates, perhaps suggesting that opioid-related damage has already been done in areas with low labor force participation.last_img read more

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France prepares 15 billion euro push to foster AI research

Emmanuel Macron wants to make France an AI hub President Emmanuel Macron is to unveil Thursday a bold plan to make France a centre of reference for artificial intelligence research, aimed at drawing homegrown and foreign talent in a field dominated by US and Chinese players. © 2018 AFP Citation: France prepares 1.5 billion euro push to foster AI research (2018, March 29) retrieved 18 July 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2018-03-france-billion-euro-foster-ai.html Explore further Samsung, Fujitsu pick France for new AI research centres This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. The proposals, which Macron’s office said would be backed by 1.5 billion euros ($1.85 billion) in public funds, follow months of interviews with AI experts worldwide by star mathematician Cedric Villani, now a lawmaker in Macron’s Republic On The Move (LREM) party.Villani’s report, presented Wednesday, calls for doubling the pay of young researchers and engineers, and tripling the number of students specialising in artificial intelligence over the next three years.Macron hosted a dinner Wednesday for about a dozen AI specialists and industry leaders convened as part of a conference being held in Paris on Thursday, at which he was to outline his priorities.Both Fujitsu of Japan and South Korean giant Samsung announced Wednesday that they would set up AI research centres in France, while Google said it would sponsor a dedicated AI chair at the country’s elite Polytechnique engineering school.Microsoft said it would invest $30 million in France, including at its Microsoft AI school opened this month, which is targeting 400,000 students over the next three years.Macron’s dinner guests included Yann LeCun, the New York-based Frenchman who until recently ran the AI research lab at Facebook.Also attending was Demis Hassabis of Britain’s DeepMind—creator of the AlphaGo system that in 2016 beat an elite human player of the Chinese game “Go”—which will open in France its first European research centre.”Much of the discussion centred on the best way to accompany the huge changes made possible by artificial intelligence and their ethical implications, and to ensure they are beneficial to humanity,” said Marie-Paule Cani, who will hold Google’s new AI chair, of the evening’s exchanges.’Digital champions’The AI push dovetails with Macron’s pledge to shake up the French economy and make the country more attractive to foreign investors, which has included business tax cuts and eased labour laws.Samsung’s research centre, its third largest in the world, will be headed by Luc Julia, the French researcher who co-invented Apple’s voice-activated assistant Siri before decamping for Samsung.Industry experts say that while France produces engineering talent widely sought after by companies and universities around the world, few French start-ups have managed to become top players in cutting-edge technologies.To avoid diluting its efforts and resources, Villani’s report urges the government to concentrate on four sectors: Defence and security, transport, the environment, and health.Macron is also expected to propose a European framework for facilitating cooperation between researchers and sharing data, while addressing growing concerns about privacy breaches or the replacement of thousands of jobs by machines.”We want France and Europe to be digitial champions in the service of humanity. That means for example a general rule on data protection,” France’s Digital Minister Mounir Mahjoubi told French daily Les Echos in remarks published Thursday. read more

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Saradha chit fund scam SC refuses to monitor CBI investigation

first_imgSHARE RELATED February 11, 2019 “We are not inclined to set up a monitoring committee to monitor the chit fund scam probe,” the Supreme Court bench said COMMENT The Supreme Court on Monday refused to monitor the ongoing CBI investigation into the Saradha chit fund scam in West Bengal.A two-judge bench comprising Chief Justice Ranjan Gogoi and Justice Sanjiv Khanna did not allow the application filed by some investors that despite the apex court’s 2013 order directing the CBI to probe the chit fund scam, the investigation has not attained finality.“We are not inclined to set up a monitoring committee to monitor the chit fund scam probe,” the bench said.Earlier, the apex court in 2013 had transferred the probe into the scam to the CBI. COMMENTS Saradha chit fund scam SHARE SHARE EMAIL Saradha scam: CBI grills Kolkata Police chief for second day Published onlast_img read more

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Priyanka Gandhi condemns Allahabad University and BJP for banning student union on

first_imgALLAHABAD: After around a fortnight, since the authorities of Allahabad University (AU) decided to replace the student union on the campus by student council, general secretary of the Congress party, Priyanka Gandhi has raised her voice against the decision of the AU authorities. AU authorities have not only replaced the student union on the campus but also blacklisted several student leaders of the campus, who have opposed the decision of the varsity authorities. This also included the vice president of the student union, Akhilesh Yadav of NSUI (national student union of India). Yadav was the lone office bearer of the union from NSUI. In fact he was the first NSUI member to be the part of the union in the past 13 years, since AU was made a central university in the year 2005. In her tweet, posted on Tuesday morning, Priyanka has said that AU has blacklisted the sitting vice president of NSUI just because he was opposing the decision of dissolving the concept of student union on the campus. “BJP sarkar to khud chunn ker aayi hai, magar chatron ke chunav aur unki awaz se itna darti kyun hai? Yeh tanashahi nahi hai to kya hai?” (This BJP government has come to power via direct elections but is afraid of the student union elections and the voices of students. Is this not dictatorship), she questions. इलाहाबाद विश्वविद्यालय छात्रसंघ को भंग करने के खिलाफ आवाज उठाने पर @nsui से छात्रसंघ उपाध्यक्ष अखिलेश यादव को प्रशा… https://t.co/I5qLPRerjX— Priyanka Gandhi Vadra (@priyankagandhi) 1563249215000Akhikesh is a student of BA final year and has been active against the administration’s anti-student policies like non availability of books in library, suicide of student Rajnikant Yadav, non-availability of hostels, non-availability of medical facilities to students, against the allegations of sexual harassment on vice chancellor and professors, dissolution of students’ union and proposal of students’ council. Yadav was served notice when he was protesting against the dissolution of students’ union. “I was targeted by the vice chancellor as I stood aggressively against irregularities done by him and his office.” Download The Times of India News App for Latest India News.XStart your day smart with stories curated specially for youlast_img read more