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Mayoral Candidates Square off In Three Two River Towns

first_imgBy John BurtonWith Election Day less than a week away, mayoral races are heating up in several two river towns.Sea Bright, Atlantic Highlands, and Little Silver all have contested elections for their four-year mayoral terms. Rumson, too, will be electing a mayor, but with incumbent Republican John Ekdahl running unopposed.Earlier this year, veteran Little Silver Mayor Suzanne Castleman, a Republican, announced her decision not to seek another term.After Castleman’s death on July 29, the county Republican committee and the majority of the borough council named GOP Councilman Robert Neff Jr. as interim mayor, to fill the unexpired term. Neff won his second term on the borough council last November and is now running as the GOP candidate for election to a full term as mayor.Also running for the seat is Daniel Levine, an Independent and the current council president, who is completing the third year of his first borough council term.Neff, 49, Winding Way South, is a lawyer who has lived in the borough for 17 years. He said this week he was seeking the mayor’s post because of his public service experience as a member of on the borough council. “It’s something that gave me an awful lot of satisfaction,” he said.The mayor, as he sees it, is to be the municipality’s chief executive. “Your job is to set the agenda,” he explained, and communicate with department heads and with the public. And in an age of shared services and state mandates concerning budgetary constraints, Neff said an important aspect of the office involves interacting with other local, county and state officials. “As mayor you have to increasingly look beyond your borders,” he explained.As for the challenges, the major one is, “It’s that constant battle between rising costs and decreasing revenues and mandates from Trenton,” he said.Levine, 72, Westwood Court, has lived in Little Silver for 42 years, and for 33 of them he has owned and operated Little Silver Community Hardware, Church Street. And as the borough council’s only Independent member “I’m not aligned with anybody’s thought process or agenda.” And that would serve him well as mayor, he explained. “Maybe a new approach needs to be thought of,” he said.“A mayor should be out front, accessible, be involved in as many areas as possible,” Levine said. “And to make things happen.”Living and working in the community, “I’m willing to have that time,” he said. “You have to have an open dialogue all the time.”The latest dialogue between the two candidates has resulted in a little dust-up in the closing days of the campaign. Neff had responded to a flier distributed by Levine, listing his accomplishments.In Levine’s literature, he states he was “instrumental” on a variety of fronts including working with county officials for a new bulkhead at a local bridge. Neff, apparently took exception to the Levine’s characterization of his role in the efforts. And in response this week, Neff said, “If you’re just going to talk about what you do, you need to be very careful about taking credit for things that a lot of people have had input in,” he said.Levine this week countered that he was indeed involved in the list of activities and accomplishments he noted. “There is no question about it,” he said, but acknowledging he could have used other adjectives other than “instrumental” but thought it was appropriate.In Atlantic Highlands incumbent Republican Frederick J. Rast III is seeking his second term as mayor. Hoping to unseat him is Democrat Paul Cavise, a local lawyer.Rast, 67, Eighth Avenue, is a licensed private investigator, who also owns several commercial properties in his community. He had served on the borough for three years and then came back to run and win the mayor’s seat four years ago.Rast said he can point to a record of accomplishment during his administration, which includes finally moving forward with the long discussed approximately $5 million borough hall/public library/police headquarters construction; and his and the council’s work on dissolving the Atlantic Highland-Highlands Regional Sewerage Authority, which he has long said would mean savings for taxpayers. “We accomplished a lot in the last four years,” he said, giving acknowledgement that it is in a large part the work of his hardworking borough council (which has four Republicans and two Democrats. “I’m really happy we have a good, cohesive council,” he said.He’s seeking the second term because, “I want to keep the town on track.” By “on track” he meant by “keeping our pencils sharp,” and spending frugally and working to improve the community. His agenda, he said, was “Making government run efficiently and friendly.”“My proudest accomplishment,” he pointed to, “is that I removed all of the political turmoil,” which marked public council meeting in the past,’ he said, with the current council makeup being a civil and well intention group.Cavise, 61, East Washington Avenue, sees the last four years differently.Cavise, who ran unsuccessfully for borough council three years ago, said this week, “This administration lacks vision, completely no imagination. They put their energies in the same old, same old, same old. But they need new, different, better.”He said there are missed opportunities, to utilize the efforts of volunteers to enhance a dreary, and increasingly vacant, business district (Why not paint murals on the sides of buildings? he asked.) and to maximize the municipal harbor in its earning potential. Officials should be looking at ways to make the town a destination, like other communities have, such as Red Bank and Keyport. “That’s basically what I’m trying to do,” he said, “just put Atlantic Highlands on the map.”Sea Bright, the smallest of the towns with a mayoral race in this area, has three candidates seeking an open seat. Incumbent Mayor Maria Fernades, a Democrat, decided not to seek re-election due to health considerations. Incumbent Democratic Borough Council member Dina Long, who has been on the council since 2002, is now the Democratic candidate for mayor.Also seeking the office is Republican Jo-Ann Kalaka-Adams and Independent candidate Christopher Sandel.Long, 42, New Street, is an assistant English professor at Brookdale Community College. When Fernandes made her announcement, it had Long “recognizing I have a good working relationship with all members of council, Republicans, Democrats, Independents, and I saw the opportunity to step up and be the person to work well with all to achieve results for Sea Bright,” she said.Long pointed to her experience serving on most of the council’s committees and her time as council president, as examples of her experience to make inroads on long standing issues in the community such as the heavy regional school tax burden, the long debated cell tower, the flooding the town experiences, and she hopes to increase communication between officials and the residents. “I believe I have the best understanding of our local government and our local government’s ability to provide services,” among the candidates, Long said.Sandel, 50, Willow Way, is a financial consultant who has lived in the community full time for seven years (and another seven on a seasonal basis) and is making his first run for elected office as an Independent. And what he lacks in experience, he said, he’ll make up with passion. “I bring give-a-damn,” he said, meaning he would be active and available for residents and businesses. “I’ll be a proactive, communicative mayor and I’ll be very involved,” he said.The issues for him, Sandel said, is addressing the flooding issue and to jumpstart the stalled discussion on redevelopment.Kalaka-Adams, 61, Ocean Avenue, is a medical publisher, who has lived in Sea Bright for more than 30 years. She had served a four-year term as mayor prior to the current administration. “These are challenging times right now,” she said. “And I understand that government must do more with less.”And that would require her experience and her relationship with the Republican county and state representatives, she explained. In addition, Kalaka-Adams noted, “I have started a number of things and I basically wanted to finish them.” And that would include re-examining the beachfront development initiative that had begun during her term as mayor, as well as looking at such issues and establishing a public pool for an additional revenue source; and to address such long standing issues as flooding and school taxes. “And try what we can to get that cell tower here,” she said.last_img read more

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Not Self, But Country

first_imgC.J. Stratton, a retired command master chief and veteran, hoped that this country will take care of its ill and deceased service members and their families. Photo by Tina ColellaWHILE THE NATION observes Armed Forces Day this Saturday, and Memorial Day next weekend, the heroes who should be receiving accolades and memorial services on both observances must also include the Clyde Jay Strattons of the world who join the military, do their job efficiently, quietly and thoroughly, and never ask for a moment’s praise or thanks for their sacrifices.Stratton, an octogenarian and great grandfather, can tick off dozens of names of what he knows are “real heroes,” the guys who were on battlefields from Korea through Vietnam through Desert Storm and more, the young kids who didn’t come home, the men and women who came home but were broken in mind or body as well as all the military men and women in the nation’s forces during one or both of the world wars.But Stratton – make that retired Command Master Chief C.J. Stratton –whether he likes it or not, is also a hero, the kind of guy who stays till the job is done, does it right, takes care of his sailors, and in the end, simply hopes and prays for an America where we truly take care of our ill, sick, wounded and deceased military and their families.This genial, humble and hardworking man chalked up his life history in an unusual way, but along its route, carved out several different occupations and created several important niches that even today are helping to keep the military the proud and distinguished units that they are.An Ohio native, Stratton was always a flying enthusiast, reveling in the Civil Air Patrol’s work before he was a teenager, signing up himself for the volunteer position as soon as he was 15 and eligible.At the start of the Korean War, he enlisted in the Navy, despite all his friends’ warning him he’d be shipped out soon. By the grace of God and the luck of the draw, he never did see service in Korea, though many of his friends who were later drafted did. Stratton had signed up as an air crewman “not because I was a hero, but because it paid $50 a month more that I would have gotten as a medical equipment repairman,” he said.Though the Navy’s PV2 planes, twin-tailed planes were determined to be too old for battle and hence didn’t go into Korea, he was still part of America’s fighting force that prepared and were ready to go wherever needed on a minute’s notice. Instead, he went to South America; what he recalls is that his brother served eight years in the Navy, five of them in the South Pacific during World War II. “That’s a real hero,” he exclaims, always eager to deflect attention from himself.You don’t have to ask Stratton to name more heroes, he’s got them all on the tip of his tongue: “Here’s another one for you, my good friend, Dick O’Shaughnessy, who died recently. He was an enlisted man and he earned the Distinguished Service Cross … think of that, an enlisted man with that high honor! That’s a hero. And my grandson, a young fella, who picked up something in Kenya and is now medically discharged from the Navy … these are heroes, not me.”When the active duty forces were reduced at the end of the Korean conflict, Stratton opted to stay in the Reserves while still searching for a job to support his new status as husband. He had no desire to go back into the family contracting business in Ohio, so when he heard there was an advertisement for an instructor at the Army’s Signal School at Fort Monmouth, he thought it was the best use he could make of his Navy-training as an electronics technician. At that time all he knew about New Jersey was what he had heard of fouls smells, pig farms and oil refineries. He remembered flying over Lakehurst Naval Station and thinking it was all swampland so he wasn’t holding out any hope for an attractive new home. He still chuckles heartily when he recalls getting off the train at the Little Silver railroad station and thinking it was so beautiful and wonderful he must be in Connecticut instead. And walking from the station to Fort Monmouth, he realized that once again, good for tune was following him. That was in June, 1952 and Stratton began his new position, while still remaining in the Reserves and doing his weekend training at NWS Station Earle in Colts Neck.For the next 35years, Stratton continued as an instructor at the signal school. But that isn’t all he did. Recalling his days and all he had learned in the Civil Air Patrol, he wondered why the Navy didn’t have a similar program. Lakehurst had a Sea Cadet program, the first in the country, so Stratton decided to start the second in the country at Earle. Assisted by another friend and Navy hero, the late Capt. Joseph Azzolina, he started the program which is still active at Earle, teaching teen boys and girls the mission and discipline of the US Navy while at the same time giving them experiences they may not other wise have in travel and education. Three of Stratton’s own children signed up for the Sea Cadet program at Earle over the next few years.At Fort Monmouth, Stratton was the executive officer of the MSE program and received a summary of his status report one day. When he contacted personnel to ask what it was about, and was told it meant he was eligible to retire at any time with a comfortable pension, he laughingly told them to make it official that afternoon. He did retire in 1987 – but the army called him back to serve as a consultant for its reorganization at the Signal Corps School for another six years. And still he remained an active reservist. It wasn’t until 1992 – five years after his official retirement as a civilian – when Command Master Chief Clyde Stratton retired from the US Navy, after a career that spanned 42 years.
 But those years when he was both a reservist and working for the Department of Defense were good years, this veteran recalls. When the Navy needed him for temporary duty –for instance, to step up to be the Command Master Chief at Newport when the CMC there was ill – it was comparatively easy to take leave from his government job to complete his military mission. His Navy experience, education and connections were also helpful when he was called on to help create the MSE, Mobil Subscriber Equipment communication system of linked switching nodes that provide the force with an area common-user system (ACUS). It is one of the major communications systems of an Army force at echelons corps and below (ECB). The system is digital and flexible, providing voice and data communications on an automatic, discrete-addressed, fixed-directory basis, supporting mobile and wire subscribers with a means to exchange command, control communications, computers, and intelligence, making it the system that developed what is today’s cell phone for use in the military.Looking back, it’s been an active, happy, busy–but in his terms, no way a heroic – life for this very proud Command Master Chief. One in which he has been proud and humbled to work for the country and be in the company of men and women who have given their lives to protect it.But for Americans who look to our military for safety, security, and protection, CMC Stratton can certainly be ranked up there with the best of them.last_img read more

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Steve Bruce rang Fergie for advice before Newcastle’s shock win over Spurs

first_imgAN UNDER-FIRE Steve Bruce sought the advice of the legendary Sir Alex Ferguson before masterminding Newcastle’s shock win over Spurs.The Toon boss was facing stick from supporters after replacing fan-favourite Rafa Benitez, with defeats in the first two games of his reign cranking up the pressure.2 Steve Bruce sought advice from Sir Alex Ferguson before Newcastle’s shock victory at TottenhamCredit: PA:Press Association2 The veteran manager has never shied away from contacting his former bossCredit: Getty Images – GettyBut with criticism mounting, Bruce turned to his former mentor and Manchester United icon Ferguson for help in handling the situation, according to The Athletic.The 77-year-old is reported to have told his ex-skipper to “keep his head down and get on with it”, with Bruce attempting to encourage a siege mentality among his Newcastle players.The duo enjoyed great success during their time together at Old Trafford, with the Englishman winning nine major honours in the nine years he spent under the legendary Scot.And following the debacle against Norwich, Bruce sought out a pep talk with Fergie to help inspire Newcastle’s first win of the season.The ex-Aston Villa boss then chose to deploy a 5-4-1 formation during the game in north London so as to take a greater control of the midfield battle.I have managed 900-odd games and over the years you would think there would be some sort of respectSteve BruceThe renewed attitude saw Newcastle put in a dogged display that was capped by club-record signing Joelinton getting off the mark to net the winner.Speaking after the win, Bruce said: “We have tried to quieten the storm. After two games, it’s been hard to get that criticism. I hope that gives us a little a bit of time.”It is only the first win but we have seen some big performances today.”The only way we can respond to criticism is like that.”We have had a tough week so we have had to respond in the right way and thankfully the players have. “I mean, to say I “cannot even do a warm-up” is mad.”I have managed 900-odd games and over the years you would think there would be some sort of respect.”I go back to the fact that whoever took over from Rafa Benitez was going to get the abuse. I hope that is a line in the sand.”Steve Bruce meets Joelinton midway through his first interview for Newcastlelast_img read more

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Melbourne, St Thomas secure berth in final

first_img MASSIVE RESULT Melbourne and St Thomas earned the right to contest the final of the Jamaica Cricket Association (JCA) Senior Cup after recording contrasting first-innings wins over University of the West Indies (UWI) and Kingston Cricket Club yesterday. Melbourne, in their first finals appearance since 2012, overcame the challenge of UWI after scoring 274 in response to the home team’s 244 at the Sir Frank Worrell Oval, UWI. Leading the batting exploits of Melbourne was United States batsman Steven Taylor, who ended unbeaten on 138. The left-handed strokemaker, who batted at number three and was 63 not out overnight after his team closed on 145 for one, slammed 12 fours and three sixes. He also shared in a 179-run second-wicket stand with Guyanese opener Trevon Griffith, who added six to his overnight score of 63. In-form national all-rounder Rovman Powell, with six wickets for 75, led the bowling for UWI, with off-spinner Horaine Linton, two for 73, providing assistance. Batting a second time, UWI – who were contesting their first semi-final after entering the country’s premier two-day tournament two seasons ago – closed on 172 for eight when stumps were drawn minutes after 5 p.m. “It’s a massive result for us, having not reached the final for a while,” said Melbourne captain, Nikita Miller, reacting to their win. “We have had a good season so far and it was good to see us come here and get the better of a decent UWI team,” he added. At Goodyear Oval in St Thomas, the home team, after resuming on 178 for eight in reply to Kingston’s modest first-innings total of 163, scored 190, with in-form left-arm spinner, Paul Harrison, claiming seven for 33. Captain Carlton Baugh Jr top-scored with 53. Facing a deficit of 27, Kingston then went in chase of quick runs to try and force a result, and declared their second innings on 222 for four. Big-hitting opener Aaron Johnson hit 62, with all-rounder Derval Green adding 59. Set an outright victory target of 195, St Thomas closed on 112 for four.last_img read more

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‘Diabetics Don’t Have to Die Prematurely’

first_imgMs. Matthews explains methods to manage diabetes– Ms. Sharon Matthews, Liberia Diabetes CenterDiabetics should not have to die prematurely, because there are steps to take to manage the disease and enjoy a long, happy life, according to Ms. Sharon Matthews of the Liberia Diabetic Center (LDC).In an interview recently in Monrovia, Ms. Matthews said because many diabetic Liberians are not aware of their condition, they become victims when their sugar levels are high and they are rushed to medical centers for help.She said the center is in contact with a diabetic who was at the point of going blind but got relief when she was helped with preventable steps that brought her blood glucose level back to normal.“The woman explained that she was going blind and was so confused. She said she experienced blurred vision, which is one of the symptoms of diabetes.“Another symptom she complained about was being very thirsty; and frequent urination and tingling pain or numbness in the hands.“That is why LDC has been calling on Liberians to get tested,” said Ms. Matthews, manager at the LDC in Monrovia.Ms. Matthews said from studies and collaboration with medical centers in Monrovia, there is a troubling report that points to preventable deaths from diabetes.“Since many people have not checked whether they are diabetic or not,” she said, “there are situations where an unknown sufferer may collapse at work and the person is rushed to a nearby clinic.”She said without being aware of the history of the individual, what normally happens is that glucose is administered to the patient and in most cases the patient’s sugar level is high and therefore the administration of glucose with sugar concentration leads to instant death.“Sadly many people in our community credit witchcraft for the cause of death in such a case and clinics and hospitals we are in contact with are reporting that many people have lost their lives because they are unaware of being diabetic.“It makes sense for Liberians to be conscious of their medical history so that wrong doses or treatments are not administered at a critical time when an individual is not able to contribute to a decision that affects his or her health,” Sharon said.She said there are different types of diabetes and, depending on an individual’s physical makeup, he or she may be at risk of one type or the other.She explained that once an individual suffers from diabetes and is unaware of it, there is a high chance of suffering from related health problems. “Diabetes can lead to heart disease and stroke, kidney problems, foot problems, like ulcer and amputation, nerve damage and eye problems and blindness,” she added.She said LDC wants Liberians to know that if anyone suffers from diabetes, he or she can manage it with small steps to make a big difference to live a longer, healthier life.“We encourage Liberians to get tested and then once it is determined that one is a sufferer, we will provide you a method to ensure that you are on the right path to a healthier life,” she said.Meanwhile, the Liberia Diabetic Center is developing a gymnasium in Monrovia to afford people with diabetes access to exercise, which is key to managing and preventing diabetes, said Mr. James Momo, executive director of LDC. “We have a holistic approach that deals with obesity, hypertension (commonly known as pressure), environmental factors, counseling and nutritional support,” he added.Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)last_img read more

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Goldsmith fined for theft

first_imgAn Alexander Village, Georgetown, goldsmith was fined $100,000 when he appeared before Magistrate Fabayo Azore and admitted to a larceny charge.Ganesh Rampersuad of Lot 139 Alexander Village, admitted to the charge which stated that on September 18, 2018, he was entrusted with US$1000 equivalent to $211,000 to make two 16 ½ penny-weight gold bands but he converted the cash to his own use and benefit.In court on Wednesday, the 47-year-old man told the court that he had promised the Virtual Complainant to repay him. “I promise he I gon pay he back, and it’s because I didn’t get to finish the gold bands in time,” he told the Magistrate in plea of mitigation.As such, Magistrate Azore fined him $100,000. Failure to pay the fine will result in him serving three months imprisonment.last_img read more

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Magee throws 7 TDs

first_imgPREP FOOTBALL: Aerial assault leads Chadwick to a big win over Linfield Christian. By David Saunders STAFF WRITER Chadwick quarterback Andy Magee didn’t need bulletin-board material to motivate him to continue to rack up touchdowns and yardage this season. But it did make another stellar performance all the sweeter. Magee completed 29 of 37 pass attempts for 423 yards and seven touchdowns in Chadwick’s 60-28 nonleague win over visiting Linfield Christian Saturday. The win gives Chadwick (5-0) an unblemished nonleague record for the second straight season and saddles Linfield Prep with its first loss of the year. “They were definitely calling us out so this win is huge,” Magee said. “This is the most important thing that we’ve done all year.” Magee completed touchdown passes to four different receivers, all of whom tallied more than 85 yards. Tim Watson had seven catches for 103 yards, Josh Goldstein had eight catches for 92 yards and Trevor Neimann had six catches for 87 yards. All three receivers scored twice. George Mavredakis led Chadwick with four catches for 111 yards and a touchdown. Mavredakis’ contributions extended beyond his what he did on offense. He returned four punts for 121 yards and had a 90-yard return called back on a penalty. Each of his returns gave Chadwick first-and-10 inside Linfield Christian territory. “He’s been solid all season,” Chadwick coach Gary Willison said. “He’s been scoring touchdowns on about every third punt return he’s had.” Not to be outdone, Chadwick’s defense did its part to cement the all-around win by recovering five fumbles and limiting Linfield Christian’s Daniel Musquiz to 42 yards on 16 carries. Musquiz averaged more than 158 yards per game going into Saturday’s contest. “We knew they were a physical team that was good at running the ball, but our defense held up strong,” Willison said. Chadwick’s defense even scored a third-quarter touchdown on a 25-yard fumble return by Kevin Martinez to give the team a 48-0 lead. Linfield Christian then put on a scoring showcase of its own, using two defensive touchdowns and a pair of onside kick recoveries to rattle off 28-straight points. Magee responded to the surge by passing for two more scores. “Seeing us come out and scoring quickly was a total momentum killer for them,” Magee said. “That showed them that we’re just as physical as anybody.” david.saunders@dailybreeze.com160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set!last_img read more

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Mark Warburton: Play-off semi-final only at ‘half time’ after Brentford fall to late first-leg defeat

first_imgBrentford manager Mark Warburton issued a reminder to his side that their play-off semi-final is only at ‘half time’ after falling to a late 2-1 defeat to Middlesbrough in the first-leg at Griffin Park.Jelle Vossen had put Boro ahead but Andre Gray’s opportunist strike levelled proceedings, before Fernando Amorebieta’s deflected strike in injury time grabbed the visitors a slender advantage for the return leg at the Riverside.The Brentford players cut dejected figures at the final whistle whilst the Boro players celebrated, and Warburton hopes to capitalise on any complacency from their opponents in the second leg.“It’s 2-1 at half time. It was frustrating to lose a late goal in that nature but I was happy with the performance,” said the Bees’ boss.“There’s a lot of celebrating going on. Everyone of them without doubt is celebrating – they think they’ve won the whole tie. Let’s see what happens next week.”Warburton, who will leave his post regardless of their destiny, admitted he was left with mixed emotions on what was his final Griffin Park appearance as Brentford manager.He said: “It’s difficult because Griffin Park under the lights is a great memory.“It’s a fantastic club and it was a privilege to be a manager here. It’s just a shame we couldn’t finish on a high.”last_img read more

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Transfer rumours and paper review – Monday, May 11

first_imgHere’s the top transfer-related stories in Monday’s newspapers…Manchester City are willing to make Paul Pogba the highest-paid midfielder in the world. The France and Juventus ace is their No.1 transfer target this summer and billionaire owner Sheikh Mansour will sanction a British-record £70m bid. He will also offer Pogba, 22, a deal worth a staggering £12.5m that equates to £250,000-a-week – AFTER TAX. (Daily Star)Real Madrid are willing to sell French international Karim Benzema. Manchester United, Arsenal and Liverpool are all on alert, but would be forced to part with a sizeable £40m to secure his services. (Daily Star)Tom Cleverley has hinted he sees his future at Aston Villa. The midfielder’s contract with Manchester United expires at the end of the season and Everton are interested in signing the 25-year-old, while Southampton, Arsenal and Tottenham have been talked of as possible destinations. But he is edging towards a permanent move to Villa after his successful loan spell. (Daily Express)West Brom will try to hijack Scott Sinclair’s move to Aston Villa with their own £2.5million summer bid. (Daily Mirror)Thomas Muller has spoken about the special relationship between himself and Louis van Gaal, fueling speculation the Bayern Munich star could be set for a move to Manchester United. (Metro)Paul Robinson is to leave Blackburn Rovers this summer after seven years at the club and could rejoin Leeds United, where the academy graduate was a fans’ favourite. (Daily Mirror)And here’s the latest talkSPORT.com headlines…Brendan Rodgers cites long-term injury to Jon Flanagan as factor in Liverpool’s failed title bidChelsea boss Jose Mourinho hails ‘monsters’ of football after Blues draw with Liverpool‘I think I am the man for the job,’ claims Ramsey despite QPR’s relegation to the ChampionshipChairman Fernandes ‘100 per cent committed to QPR’s long term future,’ despite relegationlast_img read more

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Athletic Bilbao want to take Arsenal star back to Spain

first_imgAthletic Bilbao are considering a move for Arsenal full-back Nacho Monreal during the summer window, according to reports in Spain.The Spanish side have prioritised the signing of full-backs during the transfer window and believe the 31-year-old would be the ideal addition.The Gunners may allow Monreal to leave after completing a deal for left-back Sead Kolasinac earlier in the window, with Bilbao waiting with anticipation.According to Don Balon, the Spaniards are targeting either Monreal or Chelsea defender Cesar Azpilicueta this summer and are confident of landing one of their targets.Monreal is currently on Arsenal’s pre-season tour in Australia and became the Gunners’ first-choice left back towards the end of last season.The Spain international netted once in 43 appearances last term and has a contract in north London until 2019. Nacho Monreal in action for Arsenal 1last_img read more

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