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Step-By-Step Guide: Selling A Dummy

first_imgSELLING A dummy – pretending you’re about to pass but then keeping the ball yourself – is a great trick to have in your locker.“There’s no better feeling than selling a dummy to a defender, leaving them reeling in your wake,” says Matt Dawson, the ex-England scrum-half who famously sold an outrageous dummy whilst scoring for the 1997 Lions in South Africa.Fooling an opponent in this way can often help you score or create a try. But first you must convince the defender that you’re about to pass. You can only trick him into buying a dummy if you hold the ball in both hands, so that he really thinks you’re going to pass. “Use your head, hands and hips to confuse the defender, then accelerate into the space you’ve created,” Dawson adds.You have to get the timing right, though. Pretend to pass early enough to avoid crashing into your opponent, yet late enough to leave him with no time to react.Step 1: Hold the ball in two hands and look towards the team-mate who you’re pretending to pass toStep 2: The defender should be drawn towards your team-mate, thinking he’s about to intercept your pass Step 3: At the last moment, pull the ball back towards you, leaving the defender strandedStep 4: Accelerate into the space that the tricked defender has left – and it’s try time!This article appeared in the March 2012 issue of Rugby World Magazine.Find a newsagent that sells Rugby World in the UK. Or you may prefer the digital edition on your MAC, PC, or iPad. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALScenter_img Would you like to sign up to Rugby World’s excellent weekly email newsletter? Click here.For Back Issues Contact John Denton Services at 01733-385-170last_img read more

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Europe – we have the answer!

first_imgAlready, you can hear the complaints. Chief among them would be that in conferences you miss out on traditional fixtures. In fact, you do not. Take a putative season for, say, Harlequins, who are in the Aviva South conference. They would play all the other five teams in their conference home and away, making ten games in all. They would then play all six teams in the other English conference, home or away (reverse fixtures in the next season), giving us a running total of 16 fixtures.Bring cheer: can rugby learn from NFL?They would then play three matches against teams from each of the other four conferences – two for France and two for the Pro12 – giving them 12 more matches and therefore a regular-season total of 28 games, which is precisely what they play now. The plan doesn’t include the Anglo-Welsh Cup, which would cease; the weekends devoted to it could be used for rest before international matches. To keep the tournament endlessly fresh, the inter-conference opposition would be rotated every year.Then it gets serious. At the end of the regular season, each of the three leagues would have its divisional semi-finals, with the top team in Aviva South playing the runner-up in Aviva North & West, and the runner-up in Aviva South playing the top team in Aviva North & West – with a similar pattern in France and the Celtic League.This would then give us our finalists for a stupendous day of rugby at Twickenham, and in Cardiff or Dublin or Rome or Edinburgh; and in Paris. At the end of the day we have our three national champions as usual. Then the European Super Bowl begins in earnest. The three champions would enter a draw for a semi-final play-off to make the Super Bowl final. Here, Burwell becomes creative, suggesting that we could invite the winner of the previous season’s Super 15 to take part, although he tends towards the fourth semi-finalist being a wild card – the club with the best regular-season record of the three teams which lost in their national finals.The European Super Bowl would then climax the whole season, to produce the overall champion. All the while, there would be a secondary competition running for the teams who didn’t make the play-off stages for the elite tournament – so the Amlin Challenge Cup or its equivalent would still be running across the continent.Here, we have one giant event, with glamour and commercial appeal, but which also retains the best of the old elements and occasions. We have something that would transport European club rugby into the stratosphere. It would do away with the need to have endless numbers of committees running different competitions, it would blow away the Super 15 as any sort of competitor, and it would bail out all the big professional clubs beautifully, so that the need for so many to rely so heavily on central funding or benefactors would be eased substantially. TV rights, primary, secondary or tertiary, would be the hottest of hot properties. The planning of each season would be almost infinitely easier.Burwell was in the corridors of power for too long to imagine for a second that his brilliant plan would be adopted by the frightened men in suits any time soon. They hate everything that is not their idea, and which represents change. But, as they bicker on, they’d have to admit their alternative visions for a dramatic and profitable rugby future are drastically thin on the ground. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Reigning champs: Toulon won last season’s Heineken Cup – but will the 2013-14 tournament be the last?AS THE Heineken Cup row develops into all-out war, we delved into our back issues to remind you of Stephen Jones’s plan to solve the crisis…THE ROW surrounding the Heineken Cup is rumbling on. The English and French clubs firmly believe that the system of qualification puts them at a savage disadvantage and they also believe that distribution of funds is grossly unfair.All this adds to the traditional problems of season structure. In European rugby, competitions impinge upon each other, players switch from international to domestic to European and to Anglo-Welsh with bewildering rapidity, and it’s not to deny the strength of all these individual competitions to say that the season is a mess, that it’s getting even more cramped and messy. And because the season is not allowed to breathe, it affects the welfare of players and it affects the efforts of sponsors to maximise their investment.Help is at hand. Here we present the answer to every question and nothing less! We present a blueprint not only for a brand-new and sensational competition ending on the last weekend of the season with a European Super Bowl of real magnitude, but which removes many of the complications and pinch points, which adds not a single game to the burden on the players, which makes week-in, week-out action more glamorous on a trans-European basis and which would be a sensational attraction for players, spectators, TV and sponsors. There.We cannot claim all the credit ourselves. The plan was the brainchild of Terry Burwell, the former Leicester centre who went on to have a distinguished career as a rugby administrator. There are few men better qualified in world rugby to talk about season structures and competitions.Under the Burwell plan, there is one enormous European club tournament, with clubs playing their traditional fixtures but also playing teams from other countries, including France. Ingeniously, however, it heads off any complaints that there would be no English champion, no Celtic league champion and no French champion – because in the plan the finals of the Aviva Premiership, RaboDirect Pro12 and French Top 14 still take place.As you can see from our graphic representation of the whole tournament, it’s based squarely on the NFL in America. We tend to be sniffy about the weird and wonderful ways of American sport. What we must also be prepared to admit, however, is that the Americans can run a tournament. Organisationally, they are decades ahead. They are also prepared to be bold. Food for thought for those in European rugby terrified of change.The Burwell Plan splits our three major rugby leagues into two conferences each, giving us six conferences in all. This can be done easily as the Premiership and the Pro12 already have 12 teams in each. In France, where there are 14 teams, it would need a little change or if the French, God bless them, simply couldn’t bring themselves to drop two of their lesser teams from the top tier, then they could be allowed to compete with 14 teams, in two conferences of seven.center_img This article originally appeared in the December 2012 edition of Rugby World. The current issue is on sale now.last_img read more

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Challenge Cup: Top 14’s unwelcome distraction

first_img I was at a loose end on Thursday evening. I did think about a trip to the cinema to see Paddington, but in the end I settled down with a good book. I suppose I could have tuned into see La Rochelle host Exeter in the Challenge Cup, but why bother? The outcome was all too predictable, though admittedly the west countrymen’s winning margin of 36-10 was a little surprising. La Rochelle must really have been going through the motions.It was a similar story at Connacht, where visitors Bayonne were thrashed 42-19. Stade Francais made more of a fist of their journey to Newcastle, but the Parisians – third in the Top 14 – still ended up losing 30-23 to one of the Premiership’s strugglers.In fact the only French club to beat foreign opposition in the Challenge Cup at the weekend were Grenoble, who routed Rovigo 68-10, in front of a doughty crowd of 7,800 spectators. They like their rugby in Grenoble, which is more than can be said for coach Bernard Jackman as far as the Challenge Cup goes.No Challenge Cup fan: Grenoble coach Bernard Jackman says the competition isn’t being prioritisedThe Irishman was characteristically forthright after the game when asked about the tournament. “The Challenge Cup, from my point of view, is a bit of a pointless competition in terms of your first-grade players,” explained the former Leinster hooker. “There is no real benefit for us unless we go and win it. And, even if we do, we wouldn’t be guaranteed a place in the Champions Cup for next year.”From next season the winners of the Challenge Cup – if they haven’t already qualified for the Champions Cup through their league position – will participate in the play-off for Europe’s showpiece tournament, a cut-throat finale to the season that, in the case of a French club, would require them to travel to the winners of a play-off between the seventh placed Aviva Premiership club and the eighth placed Pro12 side.Jackman isn’t alone among Top 14 coaches in treating the Challenge Cup as an unwelcome distraction to the more serious business of domestic rugby. In the first three rounds of the competition, French clubs have beaten just six foreign opponents while racking up some pretty spectacular defeats among their twelve failures. Stade Francais lost 38-22 at home to the Dragons, Brive were thrashed 55-0 away at Gloucester and a week later were beaten at home by Italian outfit Zebre, and Grenoble were hammered 37-14 in Cardiff. For all the hyperbole about the make-up of the new Europe, in France, the European Challenge Cup is not being given much priority Rare win: Bordeaux-Begles earned the French a rare win over perpetual strugglers London Welsh LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALScenter_img Which at the moment, is not much. At least there’s always a good book.If you want to subscribe with Rugby World Click here for the latest offers But why should French clubs field full-strength teams now that the winner of the Challenge Cup no longer automatically qualifies for the following season’s Champions Cup? What’s the incentive other than filling a space in the trophy cabinet. Prestige? What, beating the likes of Rovigo and the Bucharest Wolves in front of a couple of thousand indifferent spectators?Onto a hiding: Brive suffer a heavy loss to Gloucester in another Challenge Cup lossBy the very nature of the competition the French clubs contesting the Challenge Cup weren’t among the elite of their domestic league the previous season. As it’s turned out, Bordeaux, Grenoble and Stade Francais are all now riding high in the Top 14 (sixth, fifth and third) but none have the strength in depth of a Toulon or Clermont. They have to husband their resources, particularly at this time of year, with four rounds of the Top 14 scheduled between December 20 and January 10.For French clubs in the Challenge Cup there is only one priority: the Top 14. Not only does that now offer the one automatic gateway into the Champions Cup through finishing in the top six (with the seventh placed club entering the play-off) but more importantly, struggling clubs such as La Rochelle and Lyon are already fighting a relegation battle with huge financial consequences if they lose.The French clubs would be better off without the aggravation of the Challenge Cup but obviously the Challenge Cup would not be better off without them.  The 7,800 spectators who watched Grenoble thrash Rovigo was nearly twice as many as the 4,089 crowd at Newcastle or the 4,425 fans who saw Connacht brush aside Bayonne. When Stade Francais edged past the Bucharest Wolves 13-9 in round two, they did so in front of just 600 Romanians.For how long will the French tolerate this second-rate competition? In Jackman’s view, not long. “I think the organisers have probably got a bit of a shock from how little interest the French teams have had in it,” he said. “And the public as well…the public aren’t silly and you can’t pull the wool over their eyes: they see it for what it is.”last_img read more

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The greatest hookers of all time: Colin Deans

first_imgBy 1986 he was Scotland captain and the following year he led them to the World Cup, winning his final cap in the quarter-final defeat to New Zealand.Now running his own company, Profoil, in England, Deans is a Northampton Saints fan and was on the coaching staff at the club from 1995-2001. He is still involved with Scottish rugby, mentoring young prospective internationals. TAGS: The Greatest Players LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Major teams: HawickCountry: Scotland
Test span: 1978-87Scotland caps: 52 (52 starts)Test points: 10 (2T)Although Deans had much to celebrate in his career, he was denied the chance to add a hatful of British & Irish Lions caps to his memorabilia collection because the captain of the 1983 touring squad was his rival for the hooker’s jersey, Ireland’s Ciaran Fitzgerald.Almost everyone, except tour manager Willie John McBride and Fitzgerald himself, thought Deans should have played the four Tests against the All Blacks, but he had to be content playing seven non-capping matches, while the Test side was whitewashed.Some redemption came when, three years later, he led the Lions in a one-off match against a Rest of the World XV in Cardiff to mark the International Rugby Board centenary.Bill McLaren was among those who coached Deans when he was a Hawick schoolboy. Standing 5ft 10in tall, but light in stature by current standards, Deans was the first of a new breed of mobile hookers who played like an extra back-rower – although he was still famed for his brilliant lineout throwing and his swift striking at scrum time. Colin Deans of Scotland He won his first cap in February 1978, aged 22, and had to wait until his 11th Test to get a win, although Deans himself says he doesn’t count that victory over France in February 1980 because he came off injured.Happier days followed as Deans helped Scotland draw 25-25 with New Zealand in November 1983 – the last time they have done anything but lose to the All Blacks – then claimed the Grand Slam in 1984. Colin Deans won a Grand Slam with Scotland in 1984. He retired as his country’s most capped player, and is remembered as one of the greatest hookers of all time last_img read more

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Six Nations: Italy 10-63 Ireland

first_imgHistory made: CJ Stander get’s the first ever try bonus in the Six Nations This victory was just the tonic Ireland needed after failing to get off the bus against Scotland in the opening round of the Six Nations. But what a poison pill this will be for Italy after conceding nine tries to a rampant Ireland.We’ve seen Ireland claim the first-ever try bonus in the Six Nations, courtesy of Man of the Match CJ Stander getting three dots to add to Keith Earls’s opener, while substitute Craig Gilroy also nabbed a quick-fire hat-trick himself, in the second half. You name the area, Ireland had dominance and now they head into the fallow week with more spring in their step.Maybe they will have wanted a sterner Test, but Italy boss Conor O’Shea will be glad to have a bit of extra time to consider what he has to do to pump up his teams confidence and competitive levels. This is a result that ran away from them, sticking its tongue out as it headed into the distance.WHAT’S HOT…It’s a bonus – CJ Stander will be the answer to a pub quiz question for the rest of his life after he scored to give his team the first-ever bonus point for scoring four tries in the Six Nations. And Ireland did it with relative ease in the first half. There game was one of pure control. With CJ Stander leading a rampant back-row (with Robbie Henshaw an unofficial member) they had front-foot ball all day long.Celebrations: Jamie Heaslip congratulates young Ringrose for scoringPaddy Jackson – So much has been made of the fact Johnny Sexton – “When will he be back? Is he fit? Are they lost without him?” – but Jackson was controlled and firm. He barked orders all game and was immaculate from the tee. A day he’ll remember for a long time.Irish defence – O’Brien created Gilroy’s try from a dislodged ball as a lovely metaphor of Ireland’s defensive day. For all they were poor at against Scotland – and they were as narrower that an earthworm’s waist at Murrayfield – they were incredibly mean against their hosts. Andy Farrell will be much happier.WHAT’S NOT…Déjà Vu – Italy need discipline and a good set-piece, we can all agree? Well Ireland’s first try came after the play got stuck on a loop. Ireland dominated the scrum, got advantage straight away, as they hit it up. By the third time this happened, Earls had a simple run-in to score.At a loss: Italy skipper Sergio ParisseAwful clearances – Italy, when getting rid of the ball like it was about to explode. And when they did send it, it invariably found one of Ireland’s hungry back three. They needed to find grass or touch, but they instead invited pressure. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS STATISTICS9 – Successive defeats for Italy in the Six Nations.2 – Number of hat-tricks in this game.37 – Number of defenders Italy beat.18 – The number of years since an Ireland forward last scored a hat-trick – Keith Wood in 1999.Italy: Padovani; Esposito, Benvenuti (Campagnaro 47), McLean, Venditti; Canna (Allan 71), Gori (Bronzini 60); Lovotti (Panico 64), Ghiraldini (Gega 47), Cittadini (Chistolini 40), Fuser, van Schalkwyk (Biagi 47), Mbanda, Favaro (Steyne 56), Parisse.Tries: Penalty. Con: Canna. Pen: Canna.Ireland: Kearney; Earls, Ringrose, Henshaw (Gilroy 47), Zebo (Keatley 75); Jackson, Murray (Marmion 70); Healy (McGrath 50), Scannell (Tracy 62), Furlong (J. Ryan 53), D. Ryan, Toner (Dillane 60), Stander, O’Brien (van der Flier 70), Heaslip. Tries: Earls 2, Stander 3, Gilroy 3, Ringrose. Con: Jackson 9.Yellow card: D. Ryan.last_img read more

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Autumn Internationals Scotland v Argentina preview

first_imgNew Zealander Paul Williams – who oversaw England v Japan last week – is the referee. He will be assisted by Nigel Owens and Dan Jones (both Wales), while Olly Hodges from Ireland will be the TMO.What are the line-ups?Scotland: Stuart Hogg; Sean Maitland, Huw Jones, Finn Russell, Blair Kinghorn; Adam Hastings Greig Laidlaw (captain); Alan Dell, Fraser Brown, Simon Berghan, Grant Gilchrist, Jonny Gray, Jamie Ritchie, Hamish Watson, Josh Strauss.Replacements: Stuart McInally, Alex Allan, Willem Nel, Sam Skinner, Ryan Wilson, George Horne, Alex Dunbar, Byron McGuigan.Argentina: Emiliano Bofelli; Bautista Delguy, Matias Moroni, Jeronimo de la Fuente, Ramiro Moyano; Nicolas Sanchez, Gonzalo Bertranou; Santiago Garcia Botta, Agustin Creevy, Santiago Medrano, Guido Petti, Tomas Lavanini, Pablo Matera (captain), Rodrigo Bruni, Javier Ortega Desio. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS All you need to know about Scotland’s showdown with the Pumas this weekend. #SCOvARG Martín Landajo vuelve al equipo. Estará en el banco tras haber jugado en el tramo final de la victoria por 23 a 19 ante los Wallabies como visitantes por el Personal Rugby Championship en septiembre.#JugamosTodos pic.twitter.com/K4Yvv8zxVM— Los Pumas (@lospumas) November 22, 2018 Autumn Internationals Scotland v Argentina previewWant a dose of ‘roller coaster’? Scotland are trying out some exciting new combinations while Argentina chase a much-needed win – they’ve only won two of their last 12 outings.The Pumas have toppled both South Africa and Australia in 2018, but only four month into the coaching reign of former hooker and captain Mario Ledesma, the South Americans are in need of something more to show for all their recent efforts. Next week the side face the Barbarians at Twickenham, but they’ve already lost to Ireland and France in November.Not that Scotland supremo Gregor Townsend is concerned about that opposition yearning for a result or the tight recent history between these two sides (see the stats section below). In the build-up to next year’s World Cup, Townsend is keen to see different combinations under pressure, including a midfield of Adam Hastings, Finn Russell and Huw Jones.Scotland’s oh-so narrow loss to South Africa last week was encouraging and some players really showed their value, but a week is a long time in sport and there are clearly long-term plans in place. Plus if you can shoehorn three attack-minded midfielders into one backline, we’re all going to watch.Here is what you should be aware of in the build-up to this clash.Firecracker: Huw Jones created havoc against South Africa last weekWhat’s the big team news?Scotland have made eight changes to the team that narrowly lost to South Africa last week, with head coach Townsend taking the opportunity to experiment.The big one is that Finn Russell moves from ten to 12, with Adam Hastings installed at fly-half. Allan Dell, Fraser Brown and Simon Berghan make up the front row, Grant Gilchrist comes in at lock, while Jamie Ritchie and Josh Strauss slide into the back row.Related: Huw Jones sets up an incredible try against the SpringboksBlair Kinghorn is in for Tommy Seymour, who returns to Glasgow this weekend alongside Pete Horne.The Pumas only have a few big changes after succumbing to France last weekend. Guido Petti moves from back-row to lock, pushing Matías Alemanno onto the bench. Rodrigo Bruni will get his first ever start, at seven. In the backline, Matías Moroni replaces Matías Orlando, who drops to the bench. Another crack: Adam Hastings will face Argentina again from ten Any interesting statistics?Scotland have won their last four games in a row against Argentina, a winning streak that began in Cordoba in June 2014.The last time these two met at Murrayfield, it took a Greig Laidlaw penalty three minutes past the 80 to give them a 19-16 win, avoiding the draw.Argentina’s biggest ever win against Scotland was only by nine points, at Murrayfield in 2001. Their biggest ever win at home was only by six points, in June 2008. On the other side, Scotland’s biggest ever win was by 46 points, in 1990.Pumas head coach Mario Ledesma only played at Murrayfield once, in 2005, but the Pumas won 23-19. He played Scotland four more times, losing two and winning two.Related: See Argentina face the BarbariansWhat time does it kick off and is it on TV?Scotland v Argentina, Saturday 24 November, MurrayfieldThe match in Edinburgh kicks off at 2.30pm and is live on BBC2 as well as BBC Radio Scotland. There are some other notable inclusions on the bench too. Scrum-half Martín Landajo and wing Sebastián Cancelliere are in to feature in their first games of the November window.What has been said?Scotland head coach Gregor Townsend said: “We’ve been conscious of rotating the squad to enable as many players as possible to be in the best physical condition for each contest. We are expecting those selected this weekend to bring energy and huge effort to the game and seize the opportunity to perform at their best level against a very good team.“It will be another huge challenge, not only for our forward pack, but also for our defence as Argentina play ambitious, skilful and effective attacking rugby.”Argentina replacement wing Sebastian Cancelliere said: “The spirits are good. We know we are in the correct path. It’s been a year of changes but besides the losses to Ireland and France, we know we are in the correct path. These games we are using to improve our systems.Rising high: Pumas captain Pablo Matera takes a lineout against France Man in the middle: Paul Williams took charge of England v Japan Replacements: Julian Montoya, Juan Pablo Zeiss, Lucio Sordoni, Matias Alemanno, Tomas Lezana, Martin Landajo, Matias, Orlando, Sebastian Cancelliere.Follow Rugby World on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram. “Always when you win spirits are better and training is different but we are in the correct path. We know it’s going to be difficult and we know we are playing against great nations. Scotland has improved a lot this year and had a great Six Nations. We know that this type of rugby is not Super Rugby but we trust in our systems and, if we do the things we say and we practise, we are going to thrive.”last_img read more

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London Irish in the spotlight at 2019-20 Gallagher Premiership fixtures launch

first_img TAGS: London Irish Irish will leave their rented home in Reading after next season to become tenants at Brentford FC’s new Community Stadium.As is the way with promoted clubs, Irish will be tipped by many to prop up the table again but we shall have to wait and see whether that will mean an instant return to the second tier.On 13 September, the RFU Council meets to vote on a controversial proposal to create a 13-team Premiership; should the move be passed, it’s expected that no team would be relegated at the end of the 2019-20 season. The team finishing bottom of the new 13-team Premiership in 2020-21 would then face a two-leg play-off against the Championship winners to determine who qualified for the following season’s Premiership.Let’s chat: coaches Phil Dowson, Les Kiss and Ian Peel with Martin Bayfield at the launch event (Getty)True rugby fans will be dismayed, although not surprised, by such a proposal, with a vast swathe of ‘meaningless’ games the inevitable result of this ring-fencing by deception. The Championship club will be hugely disadvantaged in the play-off system because of the different calibre of opposition each team will have faced in their respective campaigns.The irony is we’ve just had the greatest Premiership season ever – as event presenter Martin Bayfield referenced when introducing video highlights of 2018-19 – and in large part that was down to the incredible multi-team scrap to avoid the drop. What a sad day it will be for rugby if the right to promotion is effectively scrapped.It’s unlikely that Alex Lozowski has spent much time pondering such matters given he belongs to a high-flying Saracens club that hasn’t flirted with relegation since around the turn of the century. The utility player, looking bronzed from a Californian holiday, remains weighed down by news of his omission from England’s World Cup training squad.“I didn’t react very well to it. It still burns now really,” said Lozowski about the dreaded call he received from Eddie Jones. “It’s probably the most disappointing selection of my career.Opening up: Alex Lozowski, in action v Japan last autumn, spoke of the pain of World Cup rejection“It’s tough to take but I’ve got to crack on with it and there are games after the World Cup, more rugby to be played. I don’t believe I’m done with England. I think I’ve got something to offer and can make a difference to the team. I’m determined to get back in that fold and show what I can do. Hopefully I can use this darkness that I’m carrying around with me at the moment and come back a better player.”Although part of the England scene for the past three years, Lozowski has only won five caps and probably paid the price for a poor performance against Japan last autumn. His mood brightened when recalling a recent visit he made with Brad Barritt to Tottenham Hotspur Stadium, where Saracens will play Harlequins in round 15 in March.What a venue: Tottenham Hotspur Stadium will host Saracens v Harlequins next March (Getty Images)Lozowski, who as a teenager spent time in Chelsea’s academy, is a Spurs fan and met one of the club’s star players, Deli Alli, on his visit, exchanging shirts. The England footballer was taken aback at the roughed-up state of Barritt’s body. “Have you been playing today?” he asked him, unaware that the Saracens captain always looks like that!“It’s nice to be at home in front of our fans for the first game (Northampton),” said Lozowski, “and then the game that stands out for me is that one at Tottenham against Harlequins. It’s a London derby and there’s always a bit of extra bite in those games. So playing them in a stadium like Tottenham’s will be good.” London Irish in the spotlight at 2019-20 Gallagher Premiership fixtures launchThree months before the 2019-20 Gallagher Premiership season gets underway and already the fixtures are inked in until the New Year, with BT Sport’s television schedule decided for the first eight rounds. Click here to see the fixtures.The opening round takes place on 18-20 October, coinciding with the start of the knockout phase of the Rugby World Cup in Japan. By that date last year, we had already had six rounds of the Premiership; this time it will take until Christmas to reach that number.“It’s an odd season, with the games really stacked at the back end,” said Les Kiss, head coach of London Irish, at yesterday’s fixtures launch at BT Tower. “It’s going to be interesting trying to work out where you sit in the hierarchy of the competition. By Christmas time you’re probably still scratching your head thinking about where you stand.”Back with the big boys: London Irish celebrate winning the Greene King-IPA Championship in April (Getty)The Exiles are back in the big time having clinched the Championship title in April with a match to spare. Two years ago, on their previous return to the Premiership, their optimism was quickly punctured and they won only three of 22 games to finish bottom by 14 points.This time they’ve signed a clutch of experienced, mostly southern hemisphere internationals, with the likes of Sekope Kepu, Adam Coleman, Nick Phipps and Waisake Naholo linking up with talent from closer to home in the shape of Sean O’Brien, Allan Dell and Paddy Jackson. O’Brien is a long way off a return to action following hip surgery. “It will be well into next season that we find out when we get him back. That’s unfortunate,” said Kiss.In rehab: new Irish signing Sean O’Brien is a long-term absentee (Sportsfile/Getty)The former Ulster and Ireland assistant coach continued: “The club has got 12 or 13 different nationalities, so you’re trying to pull together a lot of minds about how they play the game and how they’ve grown up with it. Getting something that everyone buys into has been a real good learning experience.“The group that got us up will start the season off for us and it will be a slow integration of the players coming in, either through design or through the World Cup. We won’t have our full XV together until probably the last day of December.”Kiss was forced to fend off questions about Jackson, whose signing in May came 14 months after he had been found not guilty of rape at a trial in Belfast. The fallout led to Diageo, a major sponsor, cancelling a sponsorship deal with the club, but Kiss said: “The bottom line is we’re a rugby club looking for good players and Paddy is a quality footballer. It’s an opportunity for him to further his career.No 10: Paddy Jackson has joined from Perpignan (Getty)“People will have their opinions on the back-story and the past. We believe what we’re about and that we’re doing the right thing. Things will be thrown at us I guess. The story is about everyone, we’ve signed a lot of good players. Ultimately we’re a team and come what may, we’ll stick together. I think there’s more support (for Jackson) than not so, that’s my view.”Kiss highlighted Newcastle, relegated a year after making the semi-finals, and Northampton, who “finished like a house on fire” after early struggles, to emphasise the fluctuating fortunes of the Premiership. Irish’s initial fixtures include a trip to the champions, Saracens, who will almost certainly be without their England stars that day regardless of how Eddie Jones’s team gets on in Japan.“A good start is important but it doesn’t define the season. You’ve just got to keep working away and believe what you’re about. This game teaches you lessons pretty quickly and ultimately we’ve got to ensure we don’t get hijacked by one or two poor results early on if that happens, and stay true to what we believe will make a difference in terms of our game style and culture and where we want to take the team.“It’s bloody scary coming up, that’s for sure. We’re under no illusions. But we can’t afford to go in trying to survive, we’ve got to attack the competition. We’ve been at the Madejski Stadium 19 years and we have to do it justice. It’s important we finish our time there well.” LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALScenter_img Gleaming prize: London Irish’s Les Kiss and Franco van der Merwe at the launch in BT Tower (Getty) The Gallagher Premiership campaign gets underway with a repeat of last year’s opener, Bristol v Bath, on Friday 18 October and sparks what Bayfield calls “ultimate couch potato time” as the first three rounds overlap with the business end of the World Cup. You’ve got plenty of time to stock up the fridge.Follow Rugby World on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter.last_img read more

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2019 Rugby World Cup: New Zealand 71-9 Namibia

first_imgAt the moment, against their current opposition, it doesn’t seem to matter what the make-up of the team is either. Against Italy, New Zealand can afford to rest a few, try a few, even put pressure on some to justify their place. Will there be more risks to face? Only slightly. But the Kiwis are now looking for two crushing halves before they go into the knock-outs.They will have learnt very little new information, but the depth is good. As for the Namibians, they just confirmed why they are an asset to the World Cup in that first half. quality is a hostage to endeavour for them, but the heart is what all neutrals love.Star manBen Smith is such a classy operator. At this stage of his career he looks to be an eager auxiliary, waiting for his chance while the Mo’unga-Barrett phase takes hold in the Kiwi backline. But what an option he is.He can take his time and survey the scene against a team like Namibia. The Jordie Barrett option at fly-half will cause some musing, but his calm head and his shepherding of young back-three partners like Sevu Reec, Rieko Ioane and George Bridge is so impressive.The reaction “…the effort and the commitment, I’m so proud of the players…”A very proud @RugbyNamibia head coach Phil Davies speaks after his sides gutsy display against New Zealand #NZLvNAM #RWC2019 pic.twitter.com/ULQD94b2Mg— Rugby World Cup (@rugbyworldcup) October 6, 2019Namibia head coach Nigel Davies: “I’m very proud of the effort we put in. Particularly our ball retention and line breaks in the first half. We knew we were playing against the best team in the competition, the current champions but we gave it all we could. I couldn’t ask any more of our players. We’re very proud of them. The scoreboard looks a bit painful but there was lots to take out of the match. What a line from the big man! @RugbyNamibia starting fast against New Zealand #NZLvNAM #RWC2019Find out where you can watch at https://t.co/z0BgdPH0sf pic.twitter.com/dGRuGNeQeQ— Rugby World Cup (@rugbyworldcup) October 6, 2019But the Welwitschias only had a completion rate of 72% , and it is in the falling-off where the All Blacks thrive. The 11 tries came from braces for Lienert-Brown, Reece and Ben Smith and an army of lads on single figures. It did not matter what number was on their backs.Perenara’s try was the pick of the bunch, with the half-back squeezing in. He started the sweeping move himself and then the pass back to him was incredible, with Brad Weber throwing a behind-the-back pop to his mate. New Zealand toy with Namibia in high-scoring victory 2019 Rugby World Cup: New Zealand 71-9 NamibiaPlayed – 2Namibia wins – 0New Zealand wins – 2Did you know?Four years ago when these two sides met for the first time, it finished 58-14. Centre Johan Deysel scored a try and famously had beers with the All Blacks in the changing room after.Sam Whitelock has captained New Zealand five times before this game, doing it three times against France.In a nutshellIn the dying minutes, substitute TJ Perenara broke from ten – you read that right – and started a move that came back to him on the left wing. He ghosted in and despite it looking like he had jumped into touch in the corner, trying to score, replay after replay showed that despite what you thought, he was in to score. It was an unbelievable finish – and one he could barely believe he got.Brick wall: Lesley Klim is sent backwards (Getty Images)This was pretty much how the whole game went. Despite the staunch first half from the Namibians, in which they made breaks, slammed into contact, hustled relentlessly and held the All Blacks to just 24-9, the reiging champs ran away with it in the end.The result was predetermined and Namibia even rested a few ahead of their Test against Canada, where they hope to net their first-ever World Cup win. But the quality of the All Blacks means that they can score 11 while playing two unfamiliar tens, with Jordie Barrett and then scrum-half Perenara playing at ten.It was also a welcome return for Brodie Retallick, who has been out since an injury against South Africa in the Rugby Championship. He went off after half an hour and is set to play an hour against Italy. The Kiwis are getting one of their star men back as they roll into the quarter-finals.With 35 minutes to go, New Zealand only led by a point. It was stellar stuff from the African side. And the All Blacks saw yellow twice, with Ofa Tu’ungafasi and Nepo Laulala both getting done. But the All Blacks turned the screw when they had to.As uninspiring as they were in the first, they were fluent and inventive in the second – typified by Anton Lienert-Brown and Jordie Barrett running from an unfamiliar position. There was no jeopardy in this fixture and once Brodie Retallick went off after half an hour, there was a sense that they could relentlessly have a go.Sevu Reece’s second try was a catch-pass masterpiece of simple rugby done really, really well.Johan Deysel – who scored against the All Blacks four years ago – went off with his arm in a sling, which is a worrying sign for the Canada fixture. The Namibians will be proud of their showing against the world champions here. They made eight clean breaks and clocked up 145 tackles in the end. Man of the moment:Anton Lienert-Brown shone for New Zealand (Getty Images) #NZLvNAM @Tj_Perenara gains a rare fist pump from the shag!! @AllBlacks pic.twitter.com/xmy95c5pfF— Rugbe (@RugbeNZ) October 6, 2019center_img “To play against New Zealand or at the World Cup is a fantastic opportunity and challenge. That’s what we talked about. Taking on the challenge and embracing the opportunity.” New Zealand head coach Steve Hansen: “The first half was pretty disappointing. We didn’t turn up with the right attitude and Namibia made us pay for that. It’s a good lesson, isn’t it?“Second half, there was pretty good stuff in it. I was really pleased with Jordie Barrett at 10, (he) played very, very well.“To be the third-choice first-five, and our two superstar first-fives not playing … He got us round the back well. We ended up scoring (11) tries so there’s a lot to like about it.”New Zealand: Ben Smith, Sevu Reece (Rieko Ioane 66), Jack Goodhue (TJ Perenara 60), Anton Lienert-Brown, George Bridge; Jordie Barrett, Aaron Smith (Brad Weber 50); Joe Moody (Ofa Tu’ungafasi 53), Codie Taylor (Dane Coles 50), Nepo Laulala (Angus Ta’avao 31), Brodie Retallick (Patrick Tuipulotu), Sam Whitelock (captain), Shannon Frizell, Sam Cane, Ardie Savea (Matt Todd 60).Tries:  Reece 5, 51, Lienert-Brown 20, 46,  Ta’avao 35, Ben Smith 44, 67, Moody 41, Whitelock 55, Barrett 75, Perenara, 78. Cons: Jordie Barrett 36, 45, 43, 47, 52, 56, 68, 76.Namibia: Johan Tromp, Lesley Klim, Justin Newman, Johan Deysel (captain) Darryl De La Harpe 56), JC Greyling (Janry du Toit 51); Helarius Kisting, Damian Stevens (Eugene Jantjies 66); Andre Rademeyer., Torsten van Jaarsveld (Obert Nortjé 66), AJ De Klerk (Johan Coetzee 40), PJ Van Lill (Johan Retief 16), Tjiuee Uanivi, Prince Gaoseb, Thomasau Forbes (Adriaan Booysen 61), Janco Venter.Replacements: Nelius Theron.Pens: Stevens 2, 25, 29. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Follow our Rugby World Cup homepage which we update regularly with news and features.Also make sure you know about the Groups, Warm-ups, Dates, Fixtures, Venues, TV Coverage, Qualified Teams by clicking on the highlighted links. Finally, don’t forget to follow Rugby World on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram.last_img read more

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Why TJ Perenara would be a hit in rugby league

first_img TAGS: Highlight All Black scrum-half TJ Perenara is being linked with a move to Sydney Roosters (Getty Images) Why TJ Perenara would be a hit in rugby leagueIt’s the potential cross-code move that’s got the world talking – New Zealand star TJ Perenara to the National Rugby League’s (NRL) Sydney Roosters.All Blacks going to rugby league used to be a common occurrence. Kurt Sherlock, Frano Botica, John Timu, Marc Ellis and Craig Ellis all made successful switches, but high-profile transfers from union to league largely dried up on a big scale once the 15-man game went professional in 1995.Most recently Sonny Bill Williams made the move between the two effortlessly, and of course ‘SBW’ was a league player who first crossed to union, before going back to league, back to union and then finishing his career in league.TJ Perenara is currently playing for NTT DoCoMo Red Hurricanes in Japan (Getty Images)But Thomas Tekanapu Rawakata (TJ) going to the 13-man code would be no surprise, considering his family links. His father Thomas played for the Junior Kiwis, New Zealand rugby league’s national U20s, in the late 1980s.Two of his cousins, Henry and Marcus, both played in the NRL and Henry is a current NRL referee.Perenara has been studying and watching the sport his whole life, and this code change is not something sudden or done on a whim.As Melbourne Storm hooker and New Zealand international Brandon Smith revealed, the All Black has been analysing it for some time and getting advice on what he needs to do: The Roosters are also a perfect fit. That is the club SBW joined from union in 2013, and where he ended his career last year. They are one of the most successful and well-run clubs in the NRL, and even have France icon Frederic Michalak on their coaching staff.Last year the Roosters used former Australia coach Michael Cheika as a consultant and coach Trent Robinson is an out-of-the-box, unconventional thinker. Regarded as one of league’s best coaches, the cerebral Robinson would give Perenara the time and support to thrive.Further helping him make the switch would be having quality players around him. The Roosters are stacked with world-class talent – full-back James Tedesco, outside backs Brett and Josh Morris, half-back Luke Keary, forward Angus Crichton (who represented Australia at schoolboy level in rugby union) and fellow Kiwis Joseph Manu, Jared Waerea-Hargreaves and Sio Siua Taukeiaho.Brett Morris scores a try for Sydney Roosters (Getty Images)He wouldn’t have average players alongside him or be in a struggling team. It is the perfect environment for Perenara to learn in.“If you’re going to make a transition like this, and it’s quite the transition, going into a top club is an absolute luxury,” says dual-code Ireland international Brian Carney.“The last thing you want to be doing is being on struggle street. The Roosters will have the luxury of using him judiciously and not throwing him in the deep end.”Carney believes Perenara has “without question almost everything” to make it in league, and could even help improve it. John Davidson explains why the All Blacks scrum-half could make a successful code switch Can’t get to the shops? You can download the digital edition of Rugby World straight to your tablet or subscribe to the print edition to get the magazine delivered to your door.Follow Rugby World on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter. In union, Perenara has already won a Rugby World Cup, earned 69 New Zealand caps and lifted a Super Rugby crown with the Hurricanes.A code switch is not about money, as he could earn more in Japan or Europe than in the NRL. But league presents him with a fresh challenge, and he would succeed because he has the natural attributes.Why TJ Perenara would be a hit in rugby leagueThe 29-year-old is a strong defender with strength and speed, and the necessary body shape required. He would get tested more at hooker in league and have to make more tackles per game, but he could do it.The scrum-half is a courageous tackler who puts his body on the line and relishes the physicality, as this clip shows:Perenara is also young enough with time on his side to adapt, unlike Wales great Gareth Thomas, who was 35 when he went to rugby league.Perenara is used to playing up-tempo rugby at pace, and is a terrific support player.In league, the speed of the play is quicker and there are less stoppages, the ball is in play more, and that would suit someone with his engine and vision. “The only thing I couldn’t comment on, one of the most challenging things about rugby league and rugby union players find this, is that it’s so physically demanding stamina-wise,” he says. “The stamina needed for rugby league is a different level to union.“No question he’s got the skills. Has he got the toughness? Absolutely, he’s a rugged individual. He’s got an edge to his game, which will fit right into rugby league. And he brings a particular skill that is lacking in rugby league and that is dummy-half passing.”Now we wait to see if rumours become reality. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALSlast_img read more

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La Iglesia Episcopal de Cuba adopta un plan estratégico de…

first_img Rector Washington, DC Por Lynette WilsonPosted Mar 3, 2014 Submit an Event Listing AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Rector Martinsville, VA Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Rector Albany, NY Featured Events Submit a Press Release Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Associate Rector Columbus, GA The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector Knoxville, TN Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR La Iglesia Episcopal de Cuba adopta un plan estratégico de tres años Diama Valdés says: Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC March 31, 2017 at 11:43 am Buen día. Me gustaría saber que relación guarda la iglesia anglicana con la episcopal; si son lo mismo o no. Gracias Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Rector Tampa, FL March 31, 2017 at 2:14 pm Si. Lo mismo, mas o menos. Lynette Wilson says: Director of Music Morristown, NJ Submit a Job Listingcenter_img Press Release Service Rector Hopkinsville, KY Comments are closed. La Iglesia Episcopal de Cuba celebró su Sínodo General anual en La Habana del 21 al 23 febrero. Foto: Lynette Wilson/Episcopal News Service[Episcopal News Service – Habana, Cuba] La Iglesia Episcopal de Cuba tiene una clara visión en movimiento hacía su próximo trienio: ser una iglesia que unida en la diversidad, celebra, evangeliza, enseña, sirve y comparte el amor de Dios.Llegar a esa visión ha sido “una experiencia muy enriquecedora”, pero a veces “algo difícil”, dijo la obispa Griselda Delgado de Carpio, durante una entrevista posterior al Sínodo General con la Episcopal News Service el 23 de febrero.Para su plan estratégico del 2014 al 2016, la iglesia encuentra inspiración de la carta de Pablo a los Efesios, en concreto el capítulo 4, versículos 15-16: “sino que, siguiendo la verdad con amor, crezcamos en todo hacia aquel que es la cabeza: Cristo. De parte de él todo el cuerpo, bien concertado y entrelazado por la cohesión que aportan todas las coyunturas, recibe su crecimiento de acuerdo con la actividad proporcionada a cada uno de los miembros, para ir edificándose en amor”. Al final de los últimos tres años, el primer trienio completo de Delgado sirviendo como obispo, una visión más clara de la iglesia comenzó a desarrollarse tomando la evangelización como centro de escenario en la misión de la iglesia, ella dijo.“A partir de ahí pudimos visualizar un plan concreto desde el cual tenemos que trabajar,” agregó.Los objetivos del plan de tres años son los siguientes:fortalecer el crecimiento de la vocación pastoral, el Ministerio Ordenado y el Ministerio Laico;aumentar la sostenibilidad financiera a través de la mayordomía, la administración de proyectos y la exploración de otras fuentes nacionales;aprovechar los espacios de reflexión y formación bíblica-teológica en lo local, arcedianal y diocesano, en temas de valores, ética, historia de la iglesia, espiritualidad y familia, utilizando nuestro liderazgo capacitado.reforzar la visibilidad del quehacer de la iglesia dentro y fuera;fortalecer la capacidad de gestión y organización (incluye la plantificación, control, evaluación y sistematización;promover acciones pastorales de servicio y acompañamiento a personas y grupos  en condiciones de exclusión y vulnerabilidad, los ancianos, los que sufren de adicciones o son VIH positivas, yobtener una mejor comunicación en toda la iglesia.“Gracias a Dios que estamos obteniendo la participación de los jóvenes en la iglesia”, dijo. “Creemos que ellos no son sólo el futuro, sino el presente”.Griselda Delgado del Carpio, posa con los niños después de la Eucaristía de clausura del Sínodo General. La iglesia en el plan trienal de Cuba prioriza la formación de los niños. Foto: Lynette Wilson / Episcopal News ServiceEs por esa razón, agregó, que el plan se centra en la formación de los jóvenes, los niños y adolescentes y también aquellos en el camino hacia el sacerdocio que heredarán grandes responsabilidades.“Sigo sorprendida por la tenacidad y el corazón misionero de la iglesia episcopal en Cuba”, dijo la Obispa Presidente Katharine Jefferts Schori en un e-mail a ENS.“Ellos son un gran ejemplo para las congregaciones de la iglesia episcopal de lo que es el valor del desarrollo de recursos basado en la comunidad – valorando todos los dones que Dios ha provisto en este lugar, escuchar las necesidades de la comunidad en general, y colaborar para la misión y el ministerio. La obispa Griselda está dirigiendo un ministerio transformador en Cuba – Les insto a ir a ver si les es posible, desarrollar una asociación diocesana o parroquial, y aprender más. ”Al Sínodo General anual de la iglesia episcopal de Cuba, realizado del 21 al 23de febrero en la Catedral de la Trinidad en La Habana, asistieron los episcopales y anglicanos de Estados Unidos y Canadá, incluyendo el arzobispo Fred Hiltz, primado de la Iglesia Anglicana de Canadá.Durante su introducción a la convención, Hiltz describió a Delgado como “un gran embajador de Cuba, poniendo a la iglesia en Cuba en el mapa de la Comunión Anglicana de manera muy importante”.Delgado fue instalado en noviembre del 2010, en sustitución al obispo Miguel Tamayo de la Iglesia Anglicana del Uruguay que sirvió a la Iglesia como obispo interino por seis años, y dividiendo su tiempo entre Montevideo y La Habana.El obispo Julio César Holguín de la República Dominicana predicó durante la Eucaristía de clausura de la Asamblea General de la iglesia episcopal de Cuba. Foto: Lynette Wilson / Episcopal News ServiceDespués de la elección de Delgado, el obispo Julio César Holguín de la República Dominicana se convirtió en su mentor durante tres años, una relación que continúa de manera informal en la actualidad. Holguín encabezó una pequeña delegación, a Cuba del 18 al 25 febrero, para asistir a Sínodo General incluyendo a miembros de las diócesis compañeras.La Diócesis de la República Dominicana tiene relaciones con unas15 diócesis compañeras con sede en los Estados Unidos, y en sí sirve como un complemento de la iglesia en Cuba, aunque de una manera más informal, “sentimental”, y como una expresión de solidaridad, dijo Holguín.Pero la relación también ha adquirido un carácter práctico, por ejemplo, en la Convención General del 2009 la Iglesia Episcopal inició recortes en el presupuesto de $23 requeridos por la disminución de ingresos, lo que significó una disminución en las subvenciones a las diócesis de la Provincia IX y a los socios del pacto de la iglesia, incluyendo a Cuba.Tras esa acción, el clero de la Diócesis de la República Dominicana se comprometió a dar el 1 por ciento de sus salarios, lo que equivale a alrededor de $3,000 Total, para ser compartido por el clero en Cuba, dijo Holguín, quien agregó que el salario mensual para el clero podría ser $7 o $8.“Estábamos en una mejor posición que nadie para apoyar a la Iglesia en Cuba”, dijo. El presupuesto trienal de la iglesia episcopal asigna 106.000 dólares a la iglesia en Cuba.El obispo Julio César Holguín de la República Dominicana y el arzobispo Fred Hiltz, primado de la Iglesia Anglicana de Canadá, hablan durante la hora del almuerzo del Sínodo General de la iglesia episcopal de Cuba. Foto: Lynette Wilson/Episcopal News ServiceAl igual que la iglesia episcopal en los Estados Unidos, la iglesia anglicana de Canadá ha tenido una larga relación con la iglesia episcopal de Cuba, dijo HiltzLa Iglesia Episcopal de Cuba es una diócesis autónoma de la Comunión Anglicana, bajo la autoridad del Consejo Metropolitano de Cuba. El Consejo está presidido por Hiltz e incluye a Jefferts Schori y Arzobispo John Holder de West Indies. El concejal ha supervisado la iglesia en Cuba desde que se separó de la iglesia episcopal en los Estados Unidos en 1967.En seis años y un medio que Hiltz ha servido en el consejo, dijo, a pesar de la dificultad continua, él ha visto mucha esperanza en la iglesia, así como un impulso hacia el desarrollo del liderazgo. Tener un obispo a tiempo completo ha ayudado, añadió.“La iglesia aquí en Cuba no es una institución, sino un movimiento, un movimiento del evangelio”, dijo Hiltz.El domingo antes de la convención, el 16 de febrero, Hiltz y otros visitantes de la iglesia anglicana de Canadá visitaron una iglesia en casa en Luyanó, un área pobre de La Habana, donde la congregación que estaba muy llena celebró el Día de San Valentín, intercambiando regalos prácticos de jabón y pasta de dientes, dos necesidades que pueden ser difíciles de encontrar en Cuba.Después de la Eucaristía, la congregación llevó al grupo a la obra de su iglesia, que después la cual fue destruido hace 30 años por un huracán y se está preparando para una consagración del Domingo de Pascua.En lugar de simplemente construir un lugar de culto, dijo Hiltz, el templo incluye clínicas médicas y cuidado de los ancianos y un centro comunitario.“Uno tiene la sensación de que la iglesia está realmente en la comunidad, allí por el bien de la comunidad”, dijo Hiltz. “Al verlo en terreno enriquece mi entendimiento y ayuda en la manera en que los mantenemos en oración”.En el ofrecimiento de la oración, el contexto hace la diferencia, añadióObispa de Cuba Griselda Delgado del Carpio y el obispo Michael Bird de la Diócesis de Niagara hablan después de una sesión de trabajo. Cuba y Niagara renovaron recientemente su relación de diócesis compañeras. Foto: Lynette Wilson / Episcopal News ServiceEn la iglesia anglicana de la diócesis de Niagara de Canadá, las 91 parroquias rezan semanalmente para las iglesias en Cuba, dijo el Obispo Michael Bird, cuando fue presentado en el sínodo.La iglesia de Canadá proporciona apoyo a la Iglesia cubana apoyando los programas, el clero y los estipendios de la facultad del seminario y por medio de relaciones de compañerismo diocesano.La Diócesis de Niagara, por ejemplo, recientemente renovó su relación de compañerismo de una década con la iglesia en Cuba por otros cinco años.“Cuba es una especie de diócesis especial en la Comunión Anglicana, y nuestra asociación es una forma de expresar solidaridad y amistad, una expresión popular de eso”, dijo el Rdo. Bill Mous, director de la diócesis de la justicia, la comunidad y los ministerios globales.La iglesia episcopal de Cuba remonta sus orígenes a una presencia anglicana a partir de 1901. Hoy en día hay unas 46 congregaciones y misiones al servicio de 10,000 miembros y de las comunidades en general. Durante la década de 1960, el gobierno de Fidel Castro comenzó a tomar medidas enérgicas contra la religión, encarcelando a los líderes religiosos y a los creyentes, y no fue sino hasta la visita del Papa Juan Pablo II a Cuba en 1998, la primera visita de un Papa católico romano a la isla, que el gobierno comenzó un movimiento de regresión hacia la tolerancia de la religión.La Revolución cubana, encabezada por Castro, comenzó en 1953 y duró hasta que el presidente Fulgencio Batista fue expulsado del poder en 1959. El gobierno anticomunista, autoritario de Batista, fue sustituido por un estado socialista, que en 1965 se alineó con el partido comunista. En 2008 Raúl Castro reemplazó en la presidencia a su convaleciente hermano.Arzobispo Fred Hiltz, primado de la Iglesia Anglicana de Canadá, el obispo Julio César Holguín de la República Dominicana y el obispo Todd Ousley de la Diócesis del este de Michigan en procesión en la Eucaristía de clausura. Foto: Lynette Wilson / Episcopal News ServiceLo que sorprendió más al obispo Todd Ousley de la Diócesis del este de Michigan era la forma única de Cuba de ser anglicano.“Lo que fue más sorprendente para mí fue el sentido de como estratégicamente contextualizaron la iglesia honrando con mucho cuidado su cultura cubana y fusionar eso con el anglicanismo,” dijo, y agregó que es claro en el plan estratégico que no sólo el liderazgo del obispo es importante, pero también la de los clérigos y los laicos.También estaba impresionado, dijo, con el enfoque de la iglesia en temas de justicia y ayudar a los “más pequeños de estos”.Obispo Miguel Tamayo Zaldívar, ex obispo interino de Cuba, y el obispo Ulises Aguero, obispo emérito de Cuba, durante la procesión de Eucaristía de clausura. Foto: Lynette Wilson / Episcopal News ServiceLa experiencia de la Iglesia cubana con el socialismo y su entendimiento de que todos deben trabajar juntos en solidaridad sirve como un buen modelo para la iglesia en Norteamérica y América Latina, dijo OusleyLa superposición con el inicio del Sínodo General de la Iglesia, un grupo diverso de la misión Anglicana Episcopal – incluyendo personas de los Estados Unidos, México, Argentina, Chile, El Salvador – visitaron la iglesia de San Francisco de Asís, en Cárdenas, provincia de Matanzas, localizada, en auto, a unas dos horas del este La Habana. El grupo fue dirigido por el Rdo. Canónigo Juan Andrés Quevedo, el rector de la iglesia del Redentor [Church of the Redeemer] en Astoria, Queens, y un arcediano en la Diócesis de Long Island.Fue la primera vez en 13 años que Quevedo, quien nació en la ciudad de Matanzas y que asistió al seminario evangélico local antes de estudiar en el Trinity College, en Toronto, Canadá, ha estado de vuelta en Cuba.En el pasto junto a San Francisco de Asís hay bloques de cemento que se disponen ordenadamente en filas, casi como lápidas en un cementerio, sólo estaban allí para evitar que las bancas recién lijadas y manchadas de la iglesia tocaran la hierba.El grupo de la misión necesitaba un proyecto de servicio que esté terminado dentro de una semana para que, junto con el Rdo. Aurelio de la Paz Cot, ellos decidieran que lo mejor sería repintar las bancas, mientras que para los transeúntes, los bloques de cemento bien ordenados y las bancas secas se veían muy curiosas.“Para nosotros fue un evento de evangelización”, dijo de la Paz, quien fue un compañero de seminario de Quevedo en Matanza, y agregó que las personas cercanas, curiosas por el trabajo y trabajadores, pasaban por aquí y preguntaban: “¿Quiénes son estas personas? ”Y más que eso, para de la Paz, fue una “experiencia maravillosa” y que significó mucho para él y su congregación que la gente utilice su tiempo de vacaciones y sus recursos personales para venir a Cuba, y conocer su cultura, su gente y compartir algo de sí mismos, con otra gente que están un poco aislados.Para los que viajaron a la isla, la experiencia fue tanto de alegría y como de dolor, dijo Quevedo, con muchos de ellos comparando la experiencia de su propio país con los regímenes totalitarios y los altos niveles de pobreza.“Han visto un lado de la pobreza que no está familiarizado con ellos”, dijo, durante una visita a una granja orgánica cerca de Cárdenas dirigido por el Centro Cristiano de Reflexión y Diálogo. “Nuestros pobres son educados y eso los hace estar auto-conscientes de cómo vivir mejor, mientras que en sus países los pobres han sido golpeados hacia la desesperación”.Esa conciencia de sí mismo también se puede ver en la forma en que la iglesia opera en Cuba.“Es una iglesia muy cultural enraizada en la historia de Cuba”, dijo Carlos Austin, un seminarista de segundo año de la iglesia episcopal de Panamá.La iglesia tiene un fuerte liderazgo, dijo, pero una de sus características más definitorias es la presencia  de la juventud.“Los jóvenes realmente participan”, dijo Austin. “No es como en nuestros países, a lo mejor no son tan organizadas pero tienen la mano de obra”.Como seminarista en el Seminario Evangélico de Teología de Matanzas, Austin pasa sus fines de semana sirviendo Cuatro Esquinas, una iglesia en Los Arabos, una comunidad a unos 65 kilómetros de distancia.“Ellos son un ejemplo de lo que una iglesia debe hacer en una comunidad sabia,” dijo Austin, quien agregó que la iglesia sirve como un centro comunitario y dispensa medicinas y agua purificada. “El sacerdote y el liderazgo son vistos como ayuda; de donde yo vengo, nosotros [la iglesia] tenemos que aprender más acerca de la comunidad.“Muchas veces parece que nos centramos en la evangelización hacia el interior, aquí no se centran en la evangelización, se centran en la misión y luego sigue la evangelización”.Fue el Reverendísimo Julio Murray, obispo de Panamá, quien decidió que Austin asistiría al seminario en Cuba, en vez de Brasil, otra alternativa de Austin. Él es uno de los 17 seminaristas residentes, la escuela cuenta con 500 estudiantes de educación a distancia a través de Cuba.El obispo quería que Austin estudiara teología en el contexto latinoamericano, y para Austin, al menos en un principio, le fue difícil porque la vida cotidiana en Cuba requiere fortaleza.El transporte público en Cuba es limitado y puede tomar horas para recorrer distancias cortas, los bienes básicos como papel higiénico, jabón y pasta de dientes pueden ser difíciles de conseguir, independientemente de si se tiene o no el dinero para comprarlos, los salarios son bajos, con médicos que ganan menos de $20 al mes.Si no fuera por la bondad de los miembros de la iglesia, dijo Austin, él ya se habría ido.“Eso es lo que hizo la diferencia para mí aquí, la iglesia y la gente me acogieron”, dijo. – Lynette Wilson es una editora/reportera  para Episcopal News Service. Ella  estuvo en Cuba del 18 al 25 de febrero con una delegación dirigida por el bispo Julio César Holgún de la República Dominicana. Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rector Bath, NC Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Rector Pittsburgh, PA Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL August 10, 2017 at 7:02 pm Quiero saber que podría hacer para estudiar teología a Cuba soy seminarista de la iglesia episcopal Anglicana de Chile me gustaría estudiar a Cuba? Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector Collierville, TN Rector Shreveport, LA James Steevenson Lacroix says: Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Youth Minister Lorton, VA Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Featured Jobs & Calls TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Rector Belleville, IL Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Rector Smithfield, NC Comments (3) Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CAlast_img read more

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