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The good news about Alzheimer’s

first_img Read Full Story By age 95, people have a 50% chance of having Alzheimer’s disease. That’s the bad news. But Albert Hofman, new chair of the Department of Epidemiology at Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health and an expert in vascular and neurologic diseases, thinks that that sobering Alzheimer’s statistic will improve in the years to come.1. It’s predicted that the number of people worldwide living with dementia—about 46 million—will triple by 2050. But you’re hopeful that things will get better in the future. Why?We’ve learned that Alzheimer’s is a very prevalent disease. We’ve also learned that vascular factors are important causes of dementia and Alzheimer’s. And the good news is that these vascular factors can be influenced. You can do something about your risk for vascular diseases, by treating high blood pressure or high cholesterol, or by not smoking. We have seen a gradual decline in the incidence of dementia over the past decade, and I think it is because of those kinds of preventative interventions. It’s true that there will be more people having dementia as they become older, because numbers of older people in the world are increasing—but the incidence of dementia is not. We think, overall, that the picture for Alzheimer’s is improving.Here at Harvard Chan School, we are working on linking nine different research cohorts in the world that have focused on Alzheimer’s. This will provide us with valuable information over time for about 80,000 people, including roughly 15,000 with Alzheimer’s.last_img read more

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Ronaldo: I celebrate when I have to celebrate

first_imgCristiano Ronaldo put his much discussed sadness to one side to bask in the glory of his match-winning goal in Real Madrid’s dramatic 3-2 victory over Manchester City in the Champions League.The Spanish champions needed late goals from Karim Benzema and Ronaldo to turn a 2-1 deficit into a win in their opening Group D encounter.“It was a very good game, for those who were watching,” Ronaldo told TVE1 afterwards.“We played very well. During the first half we created but missed opportunities, and in the second both Manchester City and us played well.“We believed we could win and we did. The team has done very well, we knew we could do this and we did so on merit.”The Portuguese was asked about his celebrating of the winning goal, after he recently declared himself “sad”. “I celebrate when I have to celebrate. The match was very important and we are in the fight,” he said.last_img read more

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End of an era in Pattaya for Growling Swan and a…

first_imgKhru Ja receiving the funds from William Macey.An epic journey has now come to an end with the last donation of The Growling Swan Golf Society.Not knowing where it might lead, Peter Grey and his happy band of golfers at The Growling Swan started collecting funds in 2012 to help children and those in need around the Pattaya area. Funds were obtained by imposing a small financial penalty on those committing a minor infringement, perhaps forgetting some equipment, turning up late on the tee, hitting a ball into the water, spilling your beer or, even worse, spilling someone else’s beer, and the funds were placed in the safe hands of D-For, the furry dog who has certainly earned his retirement.Peter Grey and children observing the Covid rules.The purpose of the donations varied each year, with eight schools that had no access to clean drinking water. Thanks for D-For & friends, these schools had filtration systems installed where none existed. This saved those schools thousands of baht which had previously been spent on purchasing water from the local 7eleven or distributors instead of buying items essential to the education of the students.Table full of school uniforms from The Growling Swan.Sports equipment and clothing are also on the list of purchases, plus funds to the Glory Hut Foundation to build a house for some of their residents. You may be aware that the schools in Thailand normally start their scholastic new year in May, but for obvious reasons, this has been postponed until July. Uniforms are compulsory in all schools. Not just shirts but skirts/shorts, sports clothing and the scouting uniform for special occasions which we have all seen when travelling around. This is an expensive exercise for most families but even more so for those charities that have many children.The children studying from home.The Anti–Human Trafficking and Child Abuse Centre is a case in point. Khun Ja has 42 children in the centre, children as young as 4 years who have been abused in one way or another.Promoted ContentbrainberriesCouples Who Celebrated Their Union In A Unique, Unforgettable Waybrainberriesbrainberriesbrainberries5 Of The World’s Most Unique Theme ParksbrainberriesbrainberriesD-For going into retirement after a job well done.Buying uniforms was an annual headache that he could well do without, but this is where the Growling Swan came to the rescue with what was their last ever donation. Funds were on hand to help with this problem, which took the total amount of their donations to a remarkable 504,000 baht.The Growling Swan is no more, but no praise is too high to Peter and those that supported him, both past and present, and we wish you good luck in your future endeavors.Promoted ContentCouples Who Celebrated Their Union In A Unique, Unforgettable WaybrainberriesWho’s The Best Car Manufacturer Of All Time?brainberriesBest & Worst Celebrity Endorsed Games Ever Madebrainberries7 Reasons Why You Might Want To Become A VegetarianbrainberriesMajestic Queen Sirikit Botanic Garden in Chiang Mai open FREE on Mother’s …6 Ridiculous Health Myths That Are Actually TruebrainberriesBest Car Manufacturers In The WorldbrainberriesWhich Country Is The Most Romantic In The World?brainberriesFake brand-name goods worth over 100 million baht seized in Bangkok – Patt…10 Risky Jobs Some Women DobrainberriesA Hurricane Can Be As Powerful As 10 Atomic Bombsbrainberries9 Heroes Of Popular Memes Then And NowbrainberriesThailand focuses on Vietnamese second spread of COVID-19 cases – Pattaya M…Portuguese Street Artist Creates Hyper-Realistic 3D GraffitibrainberriesFans Don’t Know What She Looks Like Nowbrainberrieslast_img read more

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Smokin’ Joe Frazier dies after cancer fight at 67

first_imgby Dan GelstonPHILADELPHIA (AP)—Joe Frazier needed the night of his career to knock down “The Greatest.”Frazier knocked Muhammad Ali down in the 15th round and became the first man to beat him in the Fight of the Century at Madison Square Garden in March 1971, the first in a trilogy of bouts that have gone down as boxing’s most fabled fights.“That was the greatest thing that ever happened in my life,” Frazier said. EPIC BATTLE—In this March 8, 1971, file photo, Muhammad Ali crouches on the canvas as Joe Frazier circles in the background after Ali slipped during the 11th round of their title fight at Madison Square Garden in New York. (AP Photo, File) It was his biggest night, one that would never come again.The relentless, undersized heavyweight ruled the division as champion, then spent a lifetime trying to fight his way out of Ali’s shadow.Frazier, who died Monday night after a brief battle with liver cancer at the age of 67, will forever be associated with Ali. No one in boxing would ever dream of anointing Ali as The Greatest unless he, too, was linked to Smokin’ Joe.“I will always remember Joe with respect and admiration,” Ali said in a statement. “My sympathy goes out to his family and loved ones.”They fought three times, twice in the heart of New York City and once in the morning in a steamy arena in the Thrilla in Manila the Philippines. They went 41 rounds together. Neither gave an inch and both gave it their all.In their last fight in Manila in 1975, they traded punches with a fervor that seemed unimaginable among heavyweights. Frazier gave almost as good as he got for 14 rounds, then had to be held back by trainer Eddie Futch as he tried to go out for the final round, unable to see.“Closest thing to dying that I know of,” Ali said afterward.Ali was as merciless with Frazier out of the ring as he was inside it. He called him a gorilla, and mocked him as an Uncle Tom. But he respected him as a fighter, especially after Frazier won a decision to defend his heavyweight title against the then-unbeaten Ali in a fight that was so big Frank Sinatra was shooting pictures at ringside and both fighters earned an astonishing $2.5 million.The night at the Garden 40 years ago remained fresh in Frazier’s mind as he talked about his life, career and relationship with Ali a few months before he died.“I can’t go nowhere where it’s not mentioned,” he told The Associated Press.Bob Arum, who once promoted Ali, said he was saddened by Frazier’s passing.“He was such an inspirational guy. A decent guy. A man of his word,” Arum said. “I’m torn up by Joe dying at this relatively young age. I can’t say enough about Joe.”Frazier’s death was announced in a statement by his family, who asked to be able to grieve privately and said they would announce “our father’s homecoming celebration” as soon as possible.Manny Pacquiao learned of it shortly after he arrived in Las Vegas for his fight Saturday night with Juan Manuel Marquez. Like Frazier in his prime, Pacquiao has a powerful left hook that he has used in his remarkable run to stardom.“Boxing lost a great champion, and the sport lost a great ambassador,” Pacquiao said.Don King, who promoted the Thrilla in Manila, was described by a spokesman as too upset to talk about Frazier’s death.Though slowed in his later years and his speech slurred by the toll of punches taken in the ring, Frazier was still active on the autograph circuit in the months before he died. In September he went to Las Vegas, where he signed autographs in the lobby of the MGM Grand shortly before Floyd Mayweather Jr.’s fight against Victor Ortiz.An old friend, Gene Kilroy, visited with him and watched Frazier work the crowd.“He was so nice to everybody,” Kilroy said. “He would say to each of them, ‘Joe Frazier, sharp as a razor, what’s your name?’”Frazier was small for a heavyweight, weighing just 205 pounds when he won the title by stopping Jimmy Ellis in the fifth round of their 1970 fight at Madison Square Garden. But he fought every minute of every round going forward behind a vicious left hook, and there were few fighters who could withstand his constant pressure.His reign as heavyweight champion lasted only four fights—including the win over Ali—before he ran into an even more fearsome slugger than himself. George Foreman responded to Frazier’s constant attack by dropping him three times in the first round and three more in the second before their 1973 fight in Jamaica was waved to a close and the world had a new heavyweight champion.Two fights later, he met Ali in a rematch of their first fight, only this time the outcome was different. Ali won a 12-round decision, and later that year stopped George Foreman in the Rumble in the Jungle in Zaire.There had to be a third fight, though, and what a fight it was. With Ali’s heavyweight title at stake, the two met in Manila in a fight that will long be seared in boxing history.Frazier went after Ali round after round, landing his left hook with regularity as he made Ali backpedal around the ring. But Ali responded with left jabs and right hands that found their mark again and again. Even the intense heat inside the arena couldn’t stop the two as they fought every minute of every round with neither willing to concede the other one second of the round.“They told me Joe Frazier was through,” Ali told Frazier at one point during the fight.“They lied,” Frazier said, before hitting Ali with a left hook.Finally, though, Frazier simply couldn’t see and Futch would not let him go out for the 15th round. Ali won the fight while on his stool, exhausted and contemplating himself whether to go on.“It was unworldly what we had just seen,” Arum said. “Two men fighting one of the great wars of all time. It’s something I will never forget for all the years I have left.”It was one of the greatest fights ever, but it took a toll. Frazier would fight only two more times, getting knocked out in a rematch with Foreman eight months later before coming back in 1981 for an ill advised fight with Jumbo Cummings.“They should have both retired after the Manila fight,” former AP boxing writer Ed Schuyler Jr. said. “They left every bit of talent they had in the ring that day.”Born in Beaufort, S.C., on Jan 12, 1944, Frazier took up boxing early after watching weekly fights on the black and white television on his family’s small farm. He was a top amateur for several years, and became the only American fighter to win a gold medal in the 1964 Olympics in Tokyo despite fighting in the final bout with an injured left thumb.“Joe Frazier should be remembered as one of the greatest fighters of all time and a real man,” Arum told the AP in a telephone interview Monday night. “He’s a guy that stood up for himself. He didn’t compromise and always gave 100 percent in the ring. There was never a fight in the ring where Joe didn’t give 100 percent.”After turning pro in 1965, Frazier quickly became known for his punching power, stopping his first 11 opponents. Within three years he was fighting world-class opposition and, in 1970, beat Ellis to win the heavyweight title that he would hold for more than two years.A woman who answered Ellis’ phone in Kentucky said the former champion suffers from Alzheimer’s Disease, but she wanted to pass along the family’s condolences.In Philadelphia, a fellow Philadelphia fighter, longtime middleweight champion Bernard Hopkins, said Frazier was so big in the city that he should have his own statue, like the fictional Rocky character.“I saw him at one of my car washes a few weeks ago. He was in a car, just hollering at us, ‘They’re trying to get me!’ That was his hi,” Hopkins said. “I’m glad I got to see him in the last couple of months. At the end of the day, I respect the man. I believe at the end of his life, he was fighting to get that respect.”He was a fixture in Phil­a­del­phia where he trained fighters in a gym he owned and made a cameo in “Rocky.”It was his fights with Ali that would define Frazier. Though Ali was gracious in defeat in the first fight, he was as vicious with his words as he was with his punches in promoting all three fights—and he never missed a chance to get a jab in at Frazier.Frazier, who in his later years would have financial trouble and end up running a gym in his adopted hometown of Philadelphia, took the jabs personally. He felt Ali made fun of him by calling him names and said things that were not true just to get under his skin. Those feelings were only magnified as Ali went from being an icon in the ring to one of the most beloved people in the world.After a trembling Ali lit the Olympic torch in 1996 in Atlanta, Frazier was asked by a reporter what he thought about it.“They should have thrown him in,” Frazier responded.He mellowed, though, in recent years, preferring to remember the good from his fights with Ali rather than the bad. Just before the 40th anniversary of his win over Ali earlier this year—a day Frazier celebrated with parties in New York—he said he no longer felt any bitterness toward Ali, who suffers from Parkinson’s disease and is mostly mute.“I forgive him,” Frazier. “He’s in a bad way.”last_img read more

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In the Nevada desert, a team elevates a town

first_imgIn this Oct. 22, 2014 photo, Pahranagat Valley Panthers head coach Ken Higbee directs his team during practice in Alamo, Nev. To call Alamo a one stoplight town would be to elevate the status of the small collection of buildings surrounding the high school some 90 miles north of Las Vegas. (AP Photo/John Locher)ALAMO, Nev. (AP) — Life follows a familiar pattern in this impossibly green valley straddling a two-lane highway in the middle of the Nevada desert.Locals get in their pickup trucks on weekday mornings and make the hour and a half drive down U.S. 93 to jobs in Las Vegas. Sundays are reserved for church and family, a foundation laid more than a century ago by Mormon settlers and followed faithfully by their descendants.And on Fridays in the fall, they cram the new concrete bleachers of the football field at Pahranagat Valley High School to watch what may be the best little football team in America.Under lights salvaged from another school, they cheer as their sons, grandsons and great grandsons demolish yet another team in the eight-man game. Almost every boy at the school is involved with the team, and none of them have ever known what it is to lose a high school football game.The streak stood at 75 games on a recent Friday night, the longest in the nation. The eight seniors who would be honored before the game were in sixth grade when it started.“We don’t talk a lot about it,” said principal Mike Strong, who also serves as defensive coordinator. “The story we want to think about is how good we can get.”The team started in 1972 when with a young athletic director. Vaughn Higbee and a few others scraped away a cornfield next to the school, creating a place for the team to play.His son, Ken Higbee, now coaches the team. Another son is the offensive coordinator, and three younger Higbees play on the team.Actually, almost everyone plays on the team. There are 102 students in grades 9-12 at Pahranagat Valley. Of the 42 boys, 33 are on the football roster, two others are managers and one is in charge of video.A few players have caught on with college programs over the years, but recruiters don’t come to eight-man games looking for talent. Besides, most of the Panthers are already spoken for by the Mormon church, which will soon send them off on missions around the world.“The lessons we’re able to teach through football are far more important than just football,” coach Ken Higbee said. “We want to try and create great young men and outstanding leaders of tomorrow.”On this night, the team from Sandy Valley arrived for a showdown at would decide home-field advantage in the playoffs. The Sidewinders were also unbeaten, averaging of 54.8 points in the wide-open game of eight-man football, not far behind the 58.7-point average for PVHS.“Seniors, it’s your night,” Higbee told his players in the locker room before the game. “I don’t want to tell you how much I appreciate each and every one of you for the role you’ve had in this program the last 10-12 years.”Yes, 10-12 years. From second grade on many of these kids had been schooled in the same fundamentals.Against Sandy Valley, the experience showed. Pahranagat’s defenders followed their assignments, and protected their lanes. On offense, Panthers backs ran through gaping holes, and sophomore quarterback Tabor Maxwell displayed a nice touch.“The team that blocks the best and the team that tackles the best is usually going to win the game and they’re always the best at that,” Sandy Valley coach Brett Kramer said. “Add in a little skill and they’re deadly.”At the end of the first quarter it was 32-0. At halftime it was 48-6, and players danced to Michael Jackson’s “Thriller” on the PA before taking a knee around their coaches.“I’m not sure what they’re saying over there across the field,” Higbee told his team. “But what they’re thinking is that they’ve never seen anything like us before.”The game was physically brutal, but at least Sandy Valley didn’t quit. The team from Virginia City did earlier this season, deciding to start their five-hour bus trip back home at halftime after being outscored 60-6.By the time the Panthers came out for the second half, they knew the drill. The first team would go out for one series offensively and defensively. Then the backups and freshman would get their chance.The final score was 64-14, with a running clock helping make the second half mercifully short. Players lined up for traditional ringing of the old school bell, then went back to the field for another tradition — picking up garbage and anything left by players or fans.The ice cream shop where players liked to celebrate after games is now closed, but these Panthers aren’t a team that does much celebrating, anyway. On a team that has won 76 straight, they’re matter-of-fact.Most play their last games when they hang up their high school uniforms. The biggest thing awaiting most of the seniors are the two-year missions they’ll start next summer.By then, juniors will become seniors and the kids in eighth grade will be official members of the team. If all goes according to plan, there will be a seventh straight state championship banner to hang on the bleachers.The familiar pattern of life in the Pahranagat Valley goes on.last_img read more

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Youth Vote for the Thurston County Fair Mascot During the Fair

first_imgFacebook5Tweet0Pin0Submitted by Thurston County Board of CommissionersEach year the children (up to age 18) get to select the mascot for Thurston County Fair two years out. Using official ballots and a real voting machine gratis of the Thurston County Auditor’s Office, children get to look at the picture and the “plank” for each candidate and then vote. There is a running tally posted each day to keep everyone watching to see who will win!The candidates this year are:Gary GeoduckHenrietta HenDouglas FirMarty MushroomRudy Rabbit was selected by vote at the 2016 Thurston County Fair to be this year’s mascot. Photo courtesy: Thurston County ElectionsTake your children to the voting booth in the Deck Building and help out your candidate! The voting booth is open from 10:00 a.m. – 10:00 a.m. Wednesday through Saturday, and 10:00 a.m. – 6:00 p.m. on Sunday.The 2017 Exhibitor’s Guide has information and details about competing in hundreds of open class and club contests, as well as information on entry forms, camping, and this year’s calendar of events. Download the complete 2017 Exhibitor’s Guide at:  www.ThurstonCountyFair.org/exhibitor_guide.htm.For more information on the 2016 Thurston County Fair activities, contests and games you can also contact the Thurston County Fair Office at 360-786-5453 or visit the Thurston County Fair website.last_img read more

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Leafs honour Super Fan Ted Cartlidge before Saturday’s game

first_imgThe Nelson Leafs lost more than a hockey game recently when longtime supporter and security usher Ted Cartlidge passed away following a short illness.Cartlidge, 83, worked the door at the north end of the NDCC Arena during Nelson Leafs games for many years.Born in 1931 in Regina, Saskatchewan and raised in nearby Boharm, Cartlidge moved to Moose Jaw where he met and married his wife Evelyn in 1952.He began his career with the CPR and moved west with his wife and three daughters to Nelson in 1958. His son was born in 1969.Ted’s love of the arena and hockey made his volunteer work for the Leafs a joy in his life.Wife Evelyn was also a major supporter of the Green and White, attending all home games of the Leafs.The Leafs hockey club will honour Ted Cartlidge with a moment of silence prior to the start of Saturday’s Kootenay International Junior Hockey League game against Spokane Braves. Cartlidge will be enshrined in the Nelson Leafs Super Fans along with Nina Arabia, Gerry Koehle, Jim Kienholz and Ryan Woikin.Leafs look to get back to winning waysThe Nelson Leafs will be looking to snap a two game KIJHL losing streak when the clubs plays a pair of Murdoch Division rivals this weekend.Nelson begins the two-game set Friday in Grand Forks against the Border Bruins.The Leafs have yet to lose to the Boundary City squad, although all games have been very close.Nelson returns home Saturday to host the Spokane Braves at the NDCC Arena.Puck drop is 7 p.m.Green and White top Murdoch DivisionDespite dropping both games during a trip to the Eddie Mountain Division — 4-3 overtime loss to Golden and 5-2 decision to Kimberley — Nelson remains in top spot in the Murdoch Division, one point in front of second place Castlegar Rebels.However, the Beaver Valley Nitehawks, winners of three straight games including a 9-4 romping past the Rebels, are closing the gap.After the weekend, Nelson closes out the unofficial first half of the season Friday, December 19 against Grand Forks at home.last_img read more

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E-agriculture will increase youth involvement – Sport Director

first_imgThe introduction of technological advancements in Guyana’s agricultural sector will result in increased involvement of youths in the field.These sentiments were shared by the Director of Sport, Christopher Jones during Guyana’s second Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) robotics exhibition, where he noted that this and other sectors would be left behind unless Information and Communication Technology (ICT) is introduced.Jones related that many from the younger generations have a stereotypical view that agriculture entailed long hours in the sun. However, many countries have sourced drones and other devices to perform the work of tools in a shorter amount of time. According to him, if Guyana can produce such facilities, youths will be more inclined to join the field.“IT is here to stay and unless we start to develop our kids at a tender age, businesses in Guyana will be left behind. When young people hear about agriculture, there’s this mental picture that comes to mind that you see someone with a fork and under the blazing hot sun, but when you show them the new technologies in agriculture in which you can simply use your smartphones to fly a drone over your field or to irrigate or fertilise the fields, it becomes interesting,” he said.“It could be applied here in Guyana, because, as you know, we have land that we can plant but it’s to get the young people back into the agricultural fields,” the Director added.During an encounter with students of Region One (Barima-Waini), questions were posed on when would IT hubs be established to support this initiative.Jones reiterated that while this would aid in the advancement in the sector, a 24-hour electrical supply was needed, but residents only receive nine hours of electricity on a daily basis. However, when the first solar farm is completed, the youths will be gifted with IT hubs.“IT hubs are needed with consistent electricity. Places like Mabaruma for example which currently enjoys nine hours of electricity, soon to come on stream is the solar farm that is there in Mabaruma. Once that comes on stream, it will add additional hours of electricity to folks in Mabaruma, and thereafter IT hubs can be established for those children,” Jones stated.last_img read more

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Breaking: Donegal has a new €500,000 lotto winner!

first_imgDonegal has a new lotto winner.The latest €500,000 Euromillions winner was sold in Glenties.Well-known local shop the Paper Post confirmed they sold the winning ticket. The shop congratulated the winner but said they did not know who the lucky ticket holder is.Last night’s winner adds to a great run by Donegal players.Breaking: Donegal has a new €500,000 lotto winner! was last modified: April 29th, 2019 by StephenShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window) Tags:euromillionsGlentieslottowinnerlast_img read more

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Even as he rewrites HSU’s record book, Ja’Quan Gardner has sights set on another GNAC title

first_imgArcata >> Drew Petersen, Humboldt State’s longtime strength and conditioning coach, can pinpoint the exact moment when he knows a big game from Ja’Quan Gardner is on the horizon.“When you see him dancing in pregame warmups,” Petersen said, “that’s when you know Ja’Quan is gonna do something.”Gardner has done more than just bust out some dance moves or play air guitar in the minutes before a Humboldt State football game gets started. He’s danced before games, then danced on opposing defenses …last_img read more

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