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Warriors’ Kevin Durant, Andre Iguodala out vs. Orlando

first_imgKlay Thompson subscribes. You can too for just 11 cents a day for 11 months + receive a free Warriors Championship book. Sign me up!ORLANDO — The Warriors (43-18) are sitting Kevin Durant (rest) and Andre Iguodala (illness) for Thursday’s game against the Orlando Magic (28-34).“He’s just wiped out. He’s tired,” Warriors coach Steve Kerr said of Durant. “He’s been going at it hard every game.” The 30-year-old Durant, who has averaged 27.5 points on 51.4 percent shooting, has played in all of …last_img read more

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Key Workflow Tips For A Smooth Color Grading Process

first_imgIt was only a few years ago that color correction was an expensive part of the post-pipeline, only reserved for fully budgeted productions. But today, with an abundance of color software options out there, more and more filmmakers, DPs, and editors are able to properly color their footage without breaking the bank.This is great news, however for many (that haven’t gone through the process before) there are a lot of workflow issues that can cost their productions time and money.I’ve been working as a colorist for several years now. While I’m not exclusively a colorist, I spend a great deal of my time on color correction – either on the projects of my collaborators or my own personal projects. As such, I’ve seen just about every single mistake that can be made on the workflow side of things, and now go into my color projects with a very different approach than I did when I was first starting out.When most people think about color correction, they are simply thinking about the actual act of grading and adjusting their footage during the finishing stage of post. What they often neglect to consider though, is the workflow – which can be a huge mistake considering the fact that on many projects dealing with a roundtrip pipeline can be just as laborious as the actual color work itself…even when it’s done right.So if you are a colorist, or simply a producer/director that is looking to have some of your projects color corrected in the future, be sure to follow these 5 tips below as they will save you a lot of time and energy down the road.Shoot for the GradeThis first point is specific to those of you that are also involved on the production side of things. If you are a post-supervisor, producer, DP, director, etc. and will be involved in both production and post, it’s critical that you take the necessary measures during the production of your project to ensure your footage is being captured in an optimal way for the color work that you will later have done. In some cases, this can mean shooting in a flat (or log-style) setting in order to have maximum flexibility in post, while in other cases it might mean shooting with an LUT applied in camera so that your colorist (or maybe yourself, if you are the colorist) can work quickly. There isn’t a one size fits all approach to this, but by simply assessing the needs of your projects and knowing the capabilities of the camera that you are working with, you can keep your color process as streamlined as possible.Lock Your EditThis might sound ridiculous and obvious (especially for those of you with a finishing background), but you absolutely need to lock your edit before you go to color. You wouldn’t believe how many productions I’ve worked on that gave me locked edits to work on, that were later unlocked (meaning edit changes were made) and I needed to go back in and re-do some of the color work. While many color programs (such as Resolve) have tools like “Color Trace” that allow you to copy grades over to a new session when edit changes are made, this isn’t ideal as it doesn’t always work smoothly and adds more room for error during the process. So whatever you do, make sure your edits are locked and singed off on before going to color.Know How to Use ProxiesEven though most editing platforms, including FCP X and Premiere Pro can edit raw files natively, it’s still often preferable to use proxy files for editing. For those of you that are new to this, proxies are essentially smaller, lower res versions of your raw files that allow you to edit much more smoothly during the offline process. The idea is that you will later relink the footage back to your raw files during color grading, to have a best of both worlds situation. The challenge with this workflow is that you need to know exactly how to create your proxy files, as if they are not created properly, you will not be able to relink to the raw files in the color session easily.The biggest thing you need to be aware of are the file names. Your file names need to be 100% consistent between the raw and proxy files (with the exception of the file extension which will vary depending on which format you are using). By doing this, you will have an easy time re-linking your footage as whatever software you are using will be able to recognize the naming conventions that you have been using throughout the process.Be Aware of Re-timed ClipsTypically projects are brought into color software (from editing software) via a translation file – such as an XML or AAF. These files essentially tell the color software how to re-build the edits to match what was done in the NLE. In an ideal world, everything gets translated perfectly…but in reality, that’s often not the case. One of the biggest issues you need to look out for are re-timed clips (clips that are sped up, slowed down, or have speed ramps), as often times color software doesn’t read the speed data properly, and the clips come in at regular speed.Depending on the specifics of your project, there are a number of ways to deal with this issue. One option is to export the retimed clips as self contained files, and bring them into your color session as individual files. Alternatively, you could color the regular speed clips in your color software and then retime them again in your NLE, if you are round tripping.Know When to LetterboxIn some cases, you might choose to finish your project entirely inside of your color software and do your deliverables and final output straight from there. In many other instances though, you may choose to bring your colored files back into your NLE to add final titles, audio, and credits there instead. Depending on where in your pipeline you are planning on doing your final output from, you’ll want to decide when you will add your letterbox matte (assuming you are cropping to 2.40:1 or similar). The general rule of thumb is to do it at the very end of your process. If you were to add it in your color session, and then brought the colored/letterboxed files back in to your NLE, you will prevent yourself from doing any additional reframing in your NLE if you catch a shot that needs to be shifted a bit. Just to be safe, always render your files as full resolution with no letterbox, that way if you or anyone else requests a change at the end of your process, you won’t need to go back into the color session to re-export individual clips.last_img read more

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Singapore Open 2019: Nozomi Okuhara thrashes PV Sindhu in one-sided semi-final

first_imgIndia’s top-ranked shuttler PV Sindhu crashed out of Singapore Open 2019 Super 500 tournament after a straight-game defeat to arch-rival Nozomi Okuhara in the women’s singles semi-final on Saturday.Second seed and former world champion Okuhara needed just 37 minutes to outclass sixth seed Sindhu 21-7, 21-11 in a one-sided semi-final. Sindhu was completely outplayed by her familiar foe, who has been in top form in Singapore.Sindhu had headed into the semi-final clash on the back of two successive defeats against Okuhara but the Japanese shuttler executed her plans to perfection on Saturday and gave Sindhu no chances of making it three in three.Okuhara unstoppable in quest for spot in the Singapore Open finals #HSBCBWFbadminton #HSBCRaceToGuangzhou pic.twitter.com/W29DGVqgqyBWF (@bwfmedia) April 13, 2019Sindhu was struggling to keep up with the pace of Okuhara, who raced to a 9-1 lead in the first game. There was no looking back for Okuhara as she kept pushing Sindhu to the back court and found winners at will with drop shots.After the thrashing in the first game, Sindhu had a considerably long chat with coach Pullela Gopichand but it made no difference as the Indian shuttler struggled for any kind of momentum in the second game as well.World number three Okuhara will now face top-ranked Tai Tzu Ying in what promises to be a cracker of a women’s singles final on Sunday. Notably, Tai had come up with a stunning fight to outclass third seed Akana Yamaguchi in a three-game battle earlier in the day.advertisementWith Sindhu’s defeat, Indian challenge at the Singapore Open came to an end. Notably, Saina Nehwal had lost to Nozomi Okuhara in straight games in the quarter-final match on Friday.While India shuttlers have been struggling to go the distance on the tour, it’s hard not to talk about Sindhu’s dip in form in the ongoing season.The sixth-ranked women’s singles shuttler hasn’t managed to go past the semi-final stage in 2019. Known for stepping up at the big stages, Sindhu’s performances in two of the biggest tournaments of the season so far Malaysia Open and All England Badminton Championships have been far from impressive.Also Read | Kidambi Srikanth, Saina Nehwal exit Singapore Open after quarter-final defeatsAlso See:last_img read more

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Plasmonic pixels could be used to make nonfading paint

first_imgColor mixing test pattern of in-focus and out-of-focus images showing the saturation and brightness control of the plasmonic pixel design algorithm. Credit: James et al. ©2016 American Chemical Society The new plasmonic pixel images are made of arrays of aluminum nanoantennas that each produce a specific color by selectively absorbing or reflecting different wavelengths of light. The length of the nanoantenna determines its color, while the gap between each nanoantenna and the substrate determines its color saturation. Another unique characteristic of the plasmonic-pixel-based image is that it is polarization-tunable. By changing the polarization, or the direction in which the light waves oscillate, the color can essentially be switched “on and off.” This makes it possible to easily fabricate either color or grayscale images. The researchers plan to make further improvements to the plasmonic pixel concept in the future.”The immediate goals are further refining the algorithm to increase the color gamut and saturation, and to investigate the scaled-up fabrication of large-area plasmonic pixel devices with nano-imprint lithography,” James said. This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. (a) A 1.5-cm-long image produced by plasmonic pixels. This photograph was taken in 1975 by Mervyn Bishop of Australian Prime Minister Gough Whitlam pouring sand into the hand of the leader of the Gurindji communities, Vincent Lingiari, symbolically handing the Wave Hill station back to the Gurindji people. (b) Image taken with polarizer aligned to x-axis. (c) Image taken with polarizer aligned to y-axis. Credit: the Art Gallery of New South Wales More information: Timothy D. James et al. “The Plasmonic Pixel: Large Area, Wide Gamut Color Reproduction Using Aluminum Nanostructures.” Nano Letters. DOI: 10.1021/acs.nanolett.6b01250 Journal information: Nano Letters Aluminum nanoparticles could improve electronic displays Citation: Plasmonic pixels could be used to make non-fading paint (2016, May 30) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2016-05-plasmonic-pixels-non-fading.html © 2016 Phys.org In a new paper published in Nano Letters, Timothy D. James, Paul Mulvaney, and Ann Roberts at The University of Melbourne have demonstrated a new plasmonic pixel design that addresses several of the critical problems facing plasmonic color images, including a limited number of colors, small image size, and difficulty in creating accurate colors without using complex color-mapping algorithms. The new plasmonic pixel design uses an algorithm that can produce nearly 2000 different colors and shades and achieve a resolution that exceeds the resolution limit of the human eye. To demonstrate, the researchers fabricated a 1.5-cm-long image (which is relatively large compared to previous plasmonic images), and showed that colors could be accurately reproduced using a straightforward color-mapping algorithm. Although other areas of plasmonics research may have potential applications as displays for phones and TVs, this plasmonic pixel produces a static image, where the color and structure are set at the time of fabrication and can’t be altered.”The potential applications for the plasmonic pixel (and other color-producing nanostructures in this research space) would be as an industrial paint on cars, buildings, advertising billboards, etc., as the plasmonic pixels will never fade,” James told Phys.org. “With the ability to print at resolutions greater than conventional pigment-based processes, the plasmonic pixels may also have applications in security-based devices for use on high-value product packaging, medicines, etc.” As the researchers explain in their paper, printed images are just one application of plasmonics research. Other plasmonic structures are already being used in sensors, light sources, and photovoltaics. All of these applications are based on the same general concept of plasmons, which are basically large masses of electrons that move together under an applied electric field. The most common plasmonic materials are gold and silver, but aluminum is the more practical candidate for large-scale applications because of its natural abundance and low cost. (Phys.org)—Researchers are developing a technology that could one day make paint and color packaging labels that never fade. The color is produced by a type of nanostructure called a “plasmonic pixel.” These pixels are made of aluminum nanoantennas, and when the free electrons in the metal collectively vibrate at specific frequencies, they produce a specific color. Explore furtherlast_img read more

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Two countries one Independence Day celebration

first_imgAs India and South Korea celebrate their Independence Day on the same date, both the countries came together for the celebrations at Siri Fort Auditorium. Nehru Bal Sangh (NBS) conducted the 5th edition of their entertaining extravaganza, Jashn-E-Azadi event where the artists from South Korea and India displayed their rich and diverse cultures. The programme showcased dance performances, audio-visual elements and musical renditions which narrated the story of Independence Day in an utterly creative way. Also Read – Add new books to your shelfStudents from various schools and eminent personalities from different fields including Vinay Pathak – Indian film actor, Lee Haekwang, and Acting Ambassador of the Republic of Korea, Kim Kum Pyoung, and Director at Korean Cultural Centre India, Shiela Dixit, Former CM of Delhi and Patron of Jashn-E-Azadi, Ashok Sahota, National President, Nehru Bal Sangh witnessed the performances.Lee Haekwang, Acting Ambassador of the Republic of Korea, said, “India is very big country, with so many ethnic groups and languages. This event gave me a chance to renew my historical knowledge. I hope this event helps in strengthening India – Korea relations”Ashok Sahota, President of Nehru Bal Sangh, said that “Indian freedom history is full of sacrifices. We should celebrate this day with zeal, enthusiasm and pride. Since it is a big day for all of us, we decided to have a joint celebration with South Korea this year” On the occasion, Kim Kum Pyoung sent his message: “Jashn-e-Azadi is an effort to spread the values of love, patriotism, and national unity.”The initiative was to rejuvenate the feelings of liberty and Independence among the youngsters. Also it was intended to encourage people to celebrate the Independence Day with much more enthusiasm, zeal, energy and pride, and not consider the festival as a mere holiday or vacation.last_img read more

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